5

this code below works well but the ESLint plugin show the warning:"Using 'ForinStatement' is not allowed" so i want to change it to other ways to prevent the warning message:

    let count = 0;
    for (const key in groups) {
      if (Object.prototype.toString.call(groups[key]) === '[object Object]') {
        if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(groups[key], 'users')) {
          count += groups[key].users.length;
        }
      }
    }
  • 1
    Why const key? Why not let or var. Also {}.hasOwnProperty.call(groups[key], 'users') can be groups[key].hasOwnProperty( 'users') – Rajesh Nov 1 '16 at 9:27
  • 2
    @Rajesh Because the key doesn't change inside of the body of the loop. That's the recommended practice. – Madara Uchiha Nov 1 '16 at 9:27
  • 1
    Would Object.keys(groups).forEach not work? – evolutionxbox Nov 1 '16 at 9:29
  • 1
    This question is a little vague. There are a number of ways you can iterate an object without for..in: Object.values, Object.entries or Object.keys with for..of or forEach or reduce. The real question is do you understand why for..in is semantically different than those options and do you need for..in for your logic to function correctly? – CodingIntrigue Nov 1 '16 at 10:06
  • 1
    @Roberrrt that they do! The answer I specifically meant was stackoverflow.com/a/18202926/989920 – evolutionxbox Nov 1 '16 at 16:08
12

If your goal alone is to avoid errors in your ESLint, i'd suggest using Object.keys(obj).forEach() I usually go with this approach in my own projects.

Pseudo-example:

Object.keys(groups).forEach(key => {
    if (Object.prototype.toString.call(groups[key]) === '[object Object]') {
        if ({}.hasOwnProperty.call(groups[key], 'users')) {
            count += groups[key].users.length;
        }
    }
});
  • 2
    thank, it work perfectly. However to prevent ESLint, you should change "Object.keys(groups).forEach(key => {" to "Object.keys(groups).forEach((key) => {" – methis Nov 2 '16 at 3:18
  • Arrow scoped parameters do not require parenthesis when single: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… It's neater to do it your way though, ++! – Roberrrt Nov 2 '16 at 7:34
1

Here are three possible ways of solving this depending on what part of the map you need, the keys, the values or both the key/value pairs.

If you need not only the key, but the value in the map you might choose:

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(object)) {
  // ...
}

If you only need the keys:

for (const key of Object.keys(object)) {
  // ...
}

Finally, if you only need the values, but not the keys you can use:

for (const value of Object.values(object)) {
  // ...
}
0

I like to implement an it helper function to iterate objects:

function* it(obj) {
  for (const key in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      yield [key, obj[key]];
    }
  }
}

Then you can iterate like so:

for (const [key, value] of it(obj)) {
  if ({}.toString.call(value) === '[object Object]' &&
      value.hasOwnProperty('users')) {
      count += connections[key].users.length;
    }
}

While this method still uses for..in, it's now contained in one function, and you can make a single exception in your ESLint file for it. Then you don't need to use it ever again.

0

You use a single line for checking and counting.

let count = Object.keys(groups).reduce((r, key) =>
    r + (('users' in groups[key]) && groups[key].users.length || 0), 0);
  • your solution got a wrong result. – methis Nov 1 '16 at 9:41
  • what is wrong in your test? – Nina Scholz Nov 1 '16 at 9:44
  • Btw, you better use 'users' in groups[key] (instead of groups[key].hasOwnProperty('users')) since otherwise semantics of the code is different. – zerkms Nov 1 '16 at 9:50

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