Since there's no such thing as an array in the C language, is the following all stored in one memory location, or is each element's value stored in an "array" of memory locations?

int array[] = {11, 13, 17, 19};
  • Scenario 1

    {11, 13, 17, 19} --> location A
    
  • Scenario 2

    {
        11 --> location A
        13 --> location B
        17 --> location C
        19 --> location D
    }
    

Which one is the valid memory layout?

  • 5
    Since there's no such thing as an array in the C language..who told you? – Sourav Ghosh Nov 1 '16 at 16:33
  • 1
    Where did you get the information that there is no array in C? – Ken White Nov 1 '16 at 16:35
  • 2
    What do you mean by "one location"? Obviously the individual ints can't all be sharing the same set of bits. The memory locations are contiguous, if that's what you're trying to ask. – Kyle Strand Nov 1 '16 at 16:36
  • 3
    The tutorial states " All arrays are simply shorthand for pointers". This is actually a common misconception (and it's disheartening to see it stated in the tutorial), but note that the tutorial itself then goes on to refer to "arrays" as though they do in fact exist--which they do. – Kyle Strand Nov 1 '16 at 16:39
  • 1
    A string is not "merely an array of chars," but a null-terminated array of chars. – David Bowling Nov 1 '16 at 16:42
up vote 7 down vote accepted

C explicitly defines "array" as a type.

Quoting C11, chapter §6.2.5, Types (emphasis mine)

An array type describes a contiguously allocated nonempty set of objects with a particular member object type, called the element type. The element type shall be complete whenever the array type is specified. Array types are characterized by their element type and by the number of elements in the array. An array type is said to be derived from its element type, and if its element type is T, the array type is sometimes called ‘‘array of T’’. The construction of an array type from an element type is called ‘‘array type derivation’’.

In a nutshell, the answer is, array elements are stored in separate but contiguous locations.

Let's suppose we have declared an array of 5 int:

int arr[5];

Then, on a platform where the size of an integer is 2 bytes (szeof(int) ==2), the array will have its elements organized like this:

enter image description here

On a different platform, where sizeof(int) == 4, it could be:

enter image description here

So the representation

{
    11 --> location A
    13 --> location B
    17 --> location C
    19 --> location D
}

is valid, considering B == A + 1, C == B + 1 and so on.

Here, please note, the pointer arithmetic regards the data type, so A+1 will not result in an address with 1 byte increment, rather the increment is by one element. In other words, the difference between the address of two consecutive element will be the same as the size of the datatype (sizeof (datatype)).

  • This answer is a little misleading because it give the impression that there are no gaps between elements, which is both true and false. Also we need to be careful when we write C == B + sizeof (datatype) without specifying the type of B. Also it would be useful to quote the definition of sizeof. – user3528438 Nov 1 '16 at 16:57
  • 1
    @user3528438 I didn't write this answer, but I don't understand your objections. "there are no gaps between elements, which is both true and false"--what do you even mean by this? It's not correct, because the standard specifies the allocation is "contiguous", so indeed there are no gaps, unless by "gaps" you include padding. But padding is part of each element of the array, not between the elements. – Kyle Strand Nov 1 '16 at 17:07
  • 1
    A, B, and C are "locations" according to the question, so obviously the "type" is some kind of pointer. The math using sizeof is thereofre neither confusing nor incorrect. Also, I'm not sure that a quoted definition of sizeof would be relevant here; if someone doesn't know what sizeof is, they can just look it up. – Kyle Strand Nov 1 '16 at 17:08
  • 1
    just to reiterate with what @KyleStrand mentioned, sizeof is a pretty self-describing name, IMHO. Description of sizeof can be found in any textbook/ tutorial and would be a little off-topic here. – Sourav Ghosh Nov 1 '16 at 17:16
  • 2
    @user3528438 Ahh, I see your point now, thanks for your efforts. Changing it now. – Sourav Ghosh Nov 1 '16 at 18:18

The elements would be in contiguous memory location.

Let array[0] is at location B and the size of each element of the array, i.e. sizeof(int), is S. Then we have this

array[0] at B
array[1] at B + S
array[2] at B + 2S
..
array[n] at B + n*S

C does have an array type. Just because you can access arrays via pointers doesn't mean they don't exist.

Array elements are stored in contiguous memory locations starting from the address "array" (i.e. the base address of array which is also the address of the first element of the array) and each element of the array is addressable separately.

Assuming 4 byte ints, the array int array[] = {11, 13, 17, 19}; would look like:

+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  11 |  13 |  17 |  19 |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+
  ^     ^     ^      ^
0x100 0x104  0x108  0x112

You can probably understand better with a simple program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
int array[] = {11, 13, 17, 19};

/* all will print the same value */
printf("Base address of array: %p, %p, %p\n", (void*)array, (void*)&array[0], (void*)array);

for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof array/sizeof array[0]; i++) {
      printf("address of array[%d]: %p\n", i, (void*)&array[i]);
}

return 0;
}

One important detail is that though the addresses &array[0] and &array are the same value, their types are different. &array[0] is of type int* (pointer to an int) whereas &array is of type int(*)[4] (pointer to an array of 4 ints).

  • In the output of your code, how many bits does the address 0x7fff50b7ea20 (on my console) hold? – dbconfession Nov 1 '16 at 16:58
  • @dbconfession The representation of the address printed by printf (for %p) is implementation-defined. That means, there's no standard number of bits/representation. It may vary on different systems. – P.P. Nov 1 '16 at 17:02
  • &array[0] and &array can not compare, hence can not compare equal, so how do you know if they are the same value? And also how do you define "value" of them? – user3528438 Nov 1 '16 at 17:02
  • @user3528438 What do you mean by "can not compare, hence can not compare equal"? "so how do you know if they are the same value?" - Because the C standard defines as such. By value I mean the addresses are the same but how they are interpreted by C's type is different (as explained at the bottom of my answer). – P.P. Nov 1 '16 at 17:07
  • 1
    @dbconfession Yes but only if the memory locations are contiguous for the object in question. It's true for arrays but not universally true. – P.P. Nov 1 '16 at 17:34

The compiler allocates the array in specific, contiguous locations.

You can also check it up with the next code:

#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
    int array[] = {11, 13, 17, 19};
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        printf("0x%p ", &array[i]);
}

That gives the hexadecimal addresses

0x14fee0 0x14fee4 0x14fee8 0x14feec

with the margin of 4 bytes per element, the size of int.


Generally, you can take the pointer to one element of the array, say index m, and add it n as a number of elements, and get the pointer to the n+m index in the array.

*(array + n) == array[n]
  • 3
    That printf should be printf("%p ", (void *)&array[i]);. – Ian Abbott Nov 1 '16 at 16:40
  • 2
    @dbconfession memory addresses indicate 1 byte, which is 8 bits. – Uriel Nov 1 '16 at 16:46
  • 1
    @UrielEli: The C-Standard leaves open the number of bits per char. Its just refers to CHAR_BIT, which for most current systems is 8 , yes. – alk Nov 1 '16 at 16:47
  • 1
    @alk: Yes, but you still need to make the printf format specifier match the argument type. (I'm sure you know that, but I don't want to confuse the OP.) – Ian Abbott Nov 1 '16 at 16:58
  • 2
    @dbconfession Per UrielEli's first comment above, an address refers to 8 bits, not 1 bit (some rare systems have other numbers of bits per byte, but it's never 1-bit per byte). In general, yes, 10110010 physically means 8 open/closed logic gates, though there's quite a few levels of abstraction between C-language pointers and physical logic gates, so it's not necessarily perfectly true that a C-pointer refers to an actual physical memory location with 8 bits. – Kyle Strand Nov 1 '16 at 17:16

Since there's no such thing as an array in the C language

There is totally such a thing as an array in the C language. All of your examples are C arrays.

The difference you are describing is the difference between a list and an array.

Arrays in C, as indeed in most languages, are like your Scenerio 1.

You could certainly accomplish your Scenerio 2 with an array of pointers to values. for example

int array1[] = {11, 14, 17, 19};
// vs 
int* array2[] = {
    &array1[0],
    &array1[1],
    &array1[2],
    &array1[3]
};

A list however is quite different in organization.

struct list_node{
    int value;
    struct list_node * next;
};

struct int_list {
    int length;
    struct list_node * first;
};

int main(){
    int i;
    struct list_node nodes[4];
    struct int_list list1 = {.length = 4, .first=&nodes[0]};
    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++){
        nodes[i].value = array1[i];
        if (i != 3){
            nodes[i].next = &nodes[i+1];
        } else {
            nodes[i].next = NULL;
        }
    }

    // traverse the list.
    struct list_node * n = list1.first;
    while(n != NULL){
        printf("%d\n", n->value);
        n = n->next;
    }
} 
  • Thanks. Please pardon my ignorance, but does each memory location store 1 bit? And if so, how can multiple int values be stored into one memory location? – dbconfession Nov 1 '16 at 16:42
  • @dbconfession: There are different sizes of memory locations. If you have an array of char, each element holds one char. If you have an array of int, each element holds one int. For most practical purposes (pace bit fields) there isn't a way to access storage locations for single bits; the smallest addressible unit is a char. So no, memory locations always store multiple bits. Until you're dealing with structures, the size is normally a multiple of 8 bits (CHAR_BIT; can be larger), and the multiple is itself a power of 2 (so 1 x 8 bits; 2 x 8 bits; 4 x 8 bits; 8 x 8 bits; etc). – Jonathan Leffler Nov 1 '16 at 16:47
  • That makes sense. I'm getting various answers above. Does my example take up 32 bits of memory since its an array of ints and not chars? – dbconfession Nov 1 '16 at 16:55
  • It will depend on the size of an int on your system. I believe an int is 4 bytes, or 32 bits, so the size of the total array would be 16 bytes. You can always use sizeof(thing) to find out the size (in bytes) of thing – Mobius Nov 1 '16 at 17:02
  • 1
    @dbconfession On modern operating systems (e.g. an x86 machine running Windows 95, Mac OS-X, or Linux) a char is 8 bits wide, an int is 32 bits wide and sizeof(int) is 4. The C standard requires an int to support values in the range -32767 to +32767, so it needs to be at least 16 bits wide. – Ian Abbott Nov 1 '16 at 17:07

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