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My goal is to vectorize the following operation in numpy,

y[n] = c1*x[n] + c2*x[n-1] + c3*y[n-1]

If n is time, I essentially need the outputs depending on previous inputs as well as previous outputs. I'm given the values of x[-1] and y[-1]. Also, this is a generalized version of my actual problem where c1 = 1.001, c2 = -1 and c3 = 1.

I could figure out the procedure to add the first two operands, simply by adding c1*x and c2*np.concatenate([x[-1], x[0:-1]), but I can't seem to figure out the best way to deal with y[n-1].

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  • np.cumsum (and related ufunc accumulate) is the most useful tool for this. Otherwise this kind of calculation is hard to express with operations that work on the whole array at once. – hpaulj Nov 1 '16 at 19:00
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    Let t be the array which sums c1 x[n] and c2 x[n-1]. If c3 is one, then I believe y is just given by np.cumsum(t), right? – jme Nov 1 '16 at 19:00
  • I did it using scipy.signal.lfilter – martianwars Nov 6 '16 at 16:18
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One may use an IIR filter to do this. scipy.signal.lfilter is the correct choice in this case.

For my specific constants, the following code snippet would do -

  from scipy import signal
  inital = signal.lfiltic([1.001,-1], [1, -1], [y_0], [x_0])
  output, _ = signal.lfilter([1.001,-1], [1, -1], input, zi=inital)

Here, signal.lfiltic is used to to specify the initial conditions.

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  • Does this have any time advantage? If so, for what size of arrays? I was trying apply this to another question, and for a small problem it was slower than the plain iteration. – hpaulj Nov 12 '16 at 1:13
  • I believe it would be having a C backend just like http://www.numpy.org/. I'm getting a lot faster results in my program as compared to a python for loop – martianwars Nov 18 '16 at 7:00
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Just by playing around with cumsum:

First a little function to produce your expression iteratively:

def foo1(x,C):
    x=x.copy()
    for i in range(1,x.shape[0]-1):
        x[i]=np.dot(x[i-1:i+2],C)
    return x[1:-1]

Make a small test array (I first worked with np.arange(10))

In [227]: y=np.arange(1,11); np.random.shuffle(y)
# array([ 4,  9,  7,  8,  2,  6,  1,  5, 10,  3])

In [229]: foo1(y,[1,2,1])
Out[229]: array([ 29,  51,  69,  79,  92,  99, 119, 142])
In [230]: y[0] + np.cumsum(2*y[1:-1] + 1*y[2:])
Out[230]: array([ 29,  51,  69,  79,  92,  99, 119, 142], dtype=int32)

and with a different C:

In [231]: foo1(y,[1,3,2])
Out[231]: array([ 45,  82, 110, 128, 148, 161, 196, 232])
In [232]: y[0]+np.cumsum(3*y[1:-1]+2*y[2:])
Out[232]: array([ 45,  82, 110, 128, 148, 161, 196, 232], dtype=int32)

I first tried:

In [238]: x=np.arange(10)
In [239]: foo1(x,[1,2,1])
Out[239]: array([  4,  11,  21,  34,  50,  69,  91, 116])
In [240]: np.cumsum(x[:-2]+2*x[1:-1]+x[2:])
Out[240]: array([  4,  12,  24,  40,  60,  84, 112, 144], dtype=int32)

and then realized that the x[:-2] term wasn't needed:

In [241]: np.cumsum(2*x[1:-1]+x[2:])
Out[241]: array([  4,  11,  21,  34,  50,  69,  91, 116], dtype=int32)

If I was back in school I probably would have discovered this sort of pattern with algebra, rather than a numpy trial-n-error. It may not be general enough, but hopefully it's a start.

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