135

How may I get information from a ReadableStream object?

I am using the Fetch API and I don't see this to be clear from the documentation.

The body is being returned as a ReadableStream and I would simply like to access a property within this stream. Under Response in the browser dev tools, I appear to have this information organised into properties, in the form of a JavaScript object.

fetch('http://192.168.5.6:2000/api/car', obj)
    .then((res) => {
        if(res.status == 200) {
            console.log("Success :" + res.statusText);   //works just fine
        }
        else if(res.status == 400) {
            console.log(JSON.stringify(res.body.json());  //res.body is undefined.
        }

        return res.json();
    })
  • 5
    Body API reference – Francesco Pezzella Nov 3 '16 at 9:43
  • 2
    @FrancescoPezzella Thanks for the response. I have tried response.Body.json() , but I am getting italic TypeError: Cannot read property 'json' of undefined italic . Is this because the bodyUsed property is also set to false? However I can view this body under the response tab in browser developer tools. There is an error message which I'd like to retrieve. – noob Nov 3 '16 at 10:35
  • So your issue is purely related to the error 400 condition? What happens if you change the handler to console.log(res.json());? Do you see the data you are expecting? – Ashley 'CptLemming' Wilson Nov 3 '16 at 16:32
  • @noob Are you trying to read the response as a stream if res.status == 200? – guest271314 Dec 18 '16 at 20:11
  • Is it just me or that documentation is plain wrong? I did fix it with the solutions on this answers though. – Lucio May 25 '18 at 19:15
177

In order to access the data from a ReadableStream you need to call one of the conversion methods (docs available here).

As an example:

fetch('https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts/1')
  .then(function(response) {
    // The response is a Response instance.
    // You parse the data into a useable format using `.json()`
    return response.json();
  }).then(function(data) {
    // `data` is the parsed version of the JSON returned from the above endpoint.
    console.log(data);  // { "userId": 1, "id": 1, "title": "...", "body": "..." }
  });

EDIT: If your data return type is not JSON or you don't want JSON then use text()

As an example:

fetch('https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts/1')
  .then(function(response) {
    return response.text();
  }).then(function(data) {
    console.log(data); // this will be a string
  });

Hope this helps clear things up.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks for the response. I have tried this and am still getting the same error where res.body is undefined. I am able to retrieve the status however in first then() function with res.status. It seems that only the body is a ReadableStream object. It does seem to have a property locked, which is set to true? – noob Nov 3 '16 at 14:41
  • Where are you trying to access res.body (this isn't part of my example)? Can you share some sample code in your original question to make it clearer where your problem might be. – Ashley 'CptLemming' Wilson Nov 3 '16 at 15:28
  • 1
    I tried accessing res.body from the json response that was returned in first .then() function. I have added a sample to my original question for more clarity. Thanks! – noob Nov 3 '16 at 16:28
  • 1
    Awesome, using react and request native, and wondering what in the world to do with a ReadableStream, and this did the trick. ++ – edencorbin Feb 12 '17 at 1:54
  • Just a headsup, seems like a no-brainer, but make sure the backend you're hitting is actually providing valid JSON! Definitely not speaking from experience. – abelito Apr 18 '19 at 22:24
44

Some people may find an async example useful:

var response = await fetch("https://httpbin.org/ip");
var body = await response.json(); // .json() is asynchronous and therefore must be awaited

json() converts the response's body from a ReadableStream to a json object.

The await statements must be wrapped in an async function, however you can run await statements directly in the console of Chrome (as of version 62).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Sometimes the real answer for you really is #2 haha, it makes sense why they'd make .json() asynchronous but it wasn't immediately obvious – Sanchit Batra Jul 21 at 1:31
29

res.json() returns a promise. Try ...

res.json().then(body => console.log(body));
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I tried this, and it printed out the Promise instead of the body. – reectrix Oct 12 '17 at 22:32
  • Try to chain the .then calls: fetch(...).then(res => res.json()).then(data => console.log(data)) – Óscar Gómez Alcañiz May 28 '19 at 11:16
12

Little bit late to the party but had some problems with getting something useful out from a ReadableStream produced from a Odata $batch request using the Sharepoint Framework.

Had similar issues as OP, but the solution in my case was to use a different conversion method than .json(). In my case .text() worked like a charm. Some fiddling was however necessary to get some useful JSON from the textfile.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Thank you! This worked for me. I am sending an Illuminate http response from my Laravel server with a simple return $data;. I was finally able to read this response in the browser with fetch(...).then(response => response.text()).then(data => console.log(data)); – Cameron Hudson Jul 25 '18 at 15:17
10

If you just want the response as text and don't want to convert it into JSON, use https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Body/text and then then it to get the actual result of the promise:

fetch('city-market.md')
  .then(function(response) {
    response.text().then((s) => console.log(s));
  });

or

fetch('city-market.md')
  .then(function(response) {
    return response.text();
  })
  .then(function(myText) {
    console.log(myText);
  });
| improve this answer | |
2

I dislike the chaining thens. The second then does not have access to status. As stated before 'response.json()' returns a promise. Returning the then result of 'response.json()' in a acts similar to a second then. It has the added bonus of being in scope of the response.

return fetch(url, params).then(response => {
    return response.json().then(body => {
        if (response.status === 200) {
            return body
        } else {
            throw body
        }
    })
})
| improve this answer | |
  • The chaining then helps you retrieve the final resolved value (the body). Nesting them prevents you from being able to get the body value without a callback or some mechanism of the sort. Imagine this: let body = await fetch(...).then(res => res.json()).then(data => data). This wouldn't work in the nested way. To check for response.status you can always throw an exception inside the first then, and add a catch to the whole promise chain. – Óscar Gómez Alcañiz May 28 '19 at 11:27
0

Note that you can only read a stream once, so in some cases, you may need to clone the response in order to repeatedly read it:

fetch('example.json')
  .then(res=>res.clone().json())
  .then( json => console.log(json))

fetch('url_that_returns_text')
  .then(res=>res.clone().text())
  .then( text => console.log(text))
| improve this answer | |

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