12

I have a coworker looking for this, and I don't recall ever running into anything like that.

Is there a reasonable technique that would let you simulate it?

SELECT PRODUCT(X)
FROM
(
    SELECT 3 X FROM DUAL
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT 5 X FROM DUAL
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 2 X FROM DUAL
)

would yield 30

26
select exp(sum(ln(col)))
  from table;

edit:

if col always > 0

5
3
DECLARE @a int
SET @a = 1
-- re-assign @a for each row in the result
-- as what @a was before * the value in the row
SELECT @a = @a * amount
FROM theTable

There's a way to do string concat that is similiar:

DECLARE @b varchar(max)
SET @b = ""

SELECT @b = @b + CustomerName
FROM Customers
3
  • No idea. MS-SQL. I wish folks would put the dbms in the question statement instead of just in the tags.
    – Amy B
    Dec 31 '08 at 20:36
  • @AmyB: the tags are the only place where to put that information. The tag info should not be repeated in the title Sep 16 '19 at 8:13
  • @a_horse_with_no_name I've been waiting 10 years and 9 months to know!
    – Amy B
    Sep 16 '19 at 11:08
3

Here's another way to do it. This is definitely the longer way to do it but it was part of a fun project.

You've got to reach back to school for this one, lol. They key to remember here is that LOG is the inverse of Exponent.

LOG10(X*Y) = LOG10(X) + LOG10(Y)

or

ln(X*Y) = ln(X) + ln(Y) (ln = natural log, or simply Log base 10)

Example
If X=5 and Y=6

X * Y = 30

ln(5) + ln(6) = 3.4

ln(30) = 3.4

e^3.4 = 30, so does 5 x 6

EXP(3.4) = 30

So above, if 5 and 6 each occupied a row in the table, we take the natural log of each value, sum up the rows, then take the exponent of the sum to get 30.

Below is the code in a SQL statement for SQL Server. Some editing is likely required to make it run on Oracle. Hopefully it's not a big difference but I suspect at least the CASE statement isn't the same on Oracle. You'll notice some extra stuff in there to test if the sign of the row is negative.

CREATE TABLE DUAL (VAL INT NOT NULL)
INSERT DUAL VALUES (3)
INSERT DUAL VALUES (5)
INSERT DUAL VALUES (2)

    SELECT 
           CASE SUM(CASE WHEN SIGN(VAL) = -1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) % 2 
               WHEN 1 THEN -1 
               ELSE 1 
           END
         * CASE 
                WHEN SUM(VAL) = 0           THEN 0 
                WHEN SUM(VAL) IS NOT NULL   THEN EXP(SUM(LOG(ABS(CASE WHEN SIGN(VAL) <> 0 THEN VAL END)))) 
                ELSE NULL 
           END
         * CASE MIN(ABS(VAL)) WHEN 0 THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
        AS PRODUCT 
      FROM DUAL
4
  • lol +1 for the sort of sideways thinking that i was looking for.
    – EvilTeach
    Dec 31 '08 at 21:37
  • cool. where we used it was as a derived table so what was nice was that the original had group by columns. those were then used in a join condition and it all executed as one lump sql statement. Dec 31 '08 at 21:42
  • Ya, I'm getting a syntax error. I will dig into it Monday. Thanks.
    – EvilTeach
    Dec 31 '08 at 21:52
  • I know this is long after the fact, but just wanted to point out that Log10 is not the same as ln. Log10 is base 10, ln is base e. LN = Loge. But as long as you use the same base for the logarithm, the math above should work out fine...you could probably use log20 on all sides of the equation and it would still work. Oct 8 '15 at 14:00
2

The accepted answer by tuinstoel is correct, of course:

select exp(sum(ln(col)))
  from table;

But notice that if col is of type NUMBER, you will find tremendous performance improvement when using BINARY_DOUBLE instead. Ideally, you would have a BINARY_DOUBLE column in your table, but if that's not possible, you can still cast col to BINARY_DOUBLE. I got a 100x improvement in a simple test that I documented here, for this cast:

select exp(sum(ln(cast(col as binary_double))))
  from table;
1

Is there a reasonable technique that would let you simulate it?

One technique could be using LISTAGG to generate product_expression string and XMLTABLE + GETXMLTYPE to evaluate it:

WITH cte AS (
  SELECT grp, LISTAGG(l, '*') AS product_expression
  FROM t
  GROUP BY grp
)
SELECT c.*, s.val AS product_value
FROM cte c
CROSS APPLY(
    SELECT *
    FROM XMLTABLE('/ROWSET/ROW/*' 
         PASSING dbms_xmlgen.getXMLType('SELECT ' || c.product_expression || ' FROM dual')
         COLUMNS val NUMBER PATH '.')
) s;

db<>fiddle demo

Output:

+------+---------------------+---------------+
| GRP  | PRODUCT_EXPRESSION  | PRODUCT_VALUE |
+------+---------------------+---------------+
| b    | 2*6                 |            12 |
| a    | 3*5*7               |           105 |
+------+---------------------+---------------+

More roboust version with handling single NULL value in the group:

WITH cte AS (
  SELECT grp, LISTAGG(l, '*') AS product_expression
  FROM t
  GROUP BY grp
)
SELECT c.*, s.val AS product_value
FROM cte c
OUTER APPLY(
   SELECT *
   FROM XMLTABLE('/ROWSET/ROW/*' 
        passing dbms_xmlgen.getXMLType('SELECT ' || c.product_expression || ' FROM dual')
        COLUMNS val NUMBER PATH '.')
   WHERE c.product_expression IS NOT NULL
) s;

db<>fiddle demo

*CROSS/OUTER APPLY(Oracle 12c) is used for convenience and could be replaced with nested subqueries.


This approach could be used for generating different aggregation functions.

0

There are many different implmentations of "SQL". When you say "does sql have" are you referring to a specific ANSI version of SQL, or a vendor specific implementation. DavidB's answer is one that works in a few different environments I have tested but depending on your environment you could write or find a function exactly like what you are asking for. Say you were using Microsoft SQL Server 2005, then a possible solution would be to write a custom aggregator in .net code named PRODUCT which would allow your original query to work exactly as you have written it.

0
0

In c# you might have to do:

SELECT EXP(SUM(LOG([col]))) 
  FROM table;

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