45

This question already has an answer here:

I have a base Class akin to the code below. I'm attempting to overload << to use with cout. However, g++ is saying:

base.h:24: warning: friend declaration ‘std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, Base<T>*)’ declares a non-template function
base.h:24: warning: (if this is not what you intended, make sure the function template has already been declared and add <> after the function name here) -Wno-non-template-friend disables this warning

I've tried adding <> after << in the class declaration / prototype. However, then I get it does not match any template declaration. I've been attempting to have the operator definition fully templated (which I want), but I've only been able to get it to work with the following code, with the operator manually instantiated.

base.h

template <typename T>
class Base {
  public:
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base<T> *e);
};

base.cpp

ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, Base<int> *e) {
    out << e->data;
return out;
}

I want to just have this or similar in the header, base.h:

template <typename T>
class Base {
  public:
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base<T> *e);
};

template <typename T>
ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, Base<T> *e) {
    out << e->data;
return out;
}

I've read elsewhere online that putting <> between << and () in the prototype should fix this, but it doesn't. Can I get this into a single function template?

marked as duplicate by M.M c++ Jun 5 '18 at 23:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    That's exactly the problem solved by Dan Saks' "Making New Friends" idiom. (Sorry for the late comment.) – gx_ Sep 7 '13 at 15:18
  • I have linked to another question with an answer that goes into detail explaining why the suggested fixes are necessary/work – M.M Jun 5 '18 at 23:14
33

It sounds like you want to change:

friend ostream& operator << (ostream& out, const Base<T>& e);

To:

template<class T>
friend ostream& operator << (ostream& out, const Base<T>& e);
  • 19
    So I didn't believe you, but this works. However, I can't use T because it shadows the already existing T of the class template. – mike_b Oct 28 '10 at 5:05
  • 1
    Does GCC give you a warning about the shadowing? – Nathan Pitman Oct 28 '10 at 5:06
  • 8
    Yes, GCC gave a warning about shadowing. I replaced T with Y and that resolved it. error: shadows template parm ‘class T’ – mike_b Oct 28 '10 at 5:15
  • 1
    Interesting. I tested my answer with Visual Studio which doesn't have a problem with the shadowing. But I can see why GCC might spit out a warning... like you said, replacing T with another template parameter will eliminate the shadowing. Btw Ben, your solution doesn't compile in MSVC. – Nathan Pitman Oct 28 '10 at 5:22
  • 9
    So operator<<(ostream&, const Base<T>&) becomes a friend of Base<S> even when S and T are distinct? I think the answer should clarify this. – Tom Artiom Fiodorov Dec 30 '13 at 19:33
17

Gcc is rightly warning you. Despite it's appearances (it takes Base argument), it is not a function template.

Your class definition has a non-template declaration of the friend function (without the template), but the friend function definition later on is a function template (i.e. starts with template..).

Also your operator<< takes a Base *. This is not correct. It should be Base const & to retain it's built-in semantics

Probably you are looking at something as below:

template <typename T> 
class Base { 
  public: 
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base<T> const &e){
       return out;
    }; 
}; 

int main(){
   Base<int> b;
   cout << b;
}

If you want fully templated, then this is probably what you want. But I am not sure how much useful this is over the previous one. Since the lookup involves ADL, you will never be able to resolve to any condition where T is not equal to U (as long as the call is from a context not related to this class e.g. from 'main' function)

template <typename T>  
class Base {  
  public:  
    template<class U> friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base<U> const &e){ 
       return out; 
    };  
};

int main(){ 
   Base<int> b; 
   cout << b; 
} 
  • Well, use of the << operator wouldn't ever find any instantiation with U != T. A direct call potentially could though, which would just be really weird. It would only matter if operator << for Base<U> accessed a global variable of type Base<T>. – Ben Voigt Oct 28 '10 at 5:48
  • @Ben Voigt: Added the part 'as long as the call is from a context not related to this class e.g. from 'main' function'. Hope it is clearer now – Chubsdad Oct 28 '10 at 5:58
  • Maybe add how to define the friend function outside the class definition, for completeness? – Gauthier Dec 14 '16 at 9:02
10

Probably what you are looking for is:

template <typename T>
class Base;

template <typename T>
ostream& operator<< (ostream &, const Base<T>&);

template <typename T>
class Base
{
  public:
    template<>
    friend ostream& operator << <T>(ostream &, const Base<T> &);
};

template <typename T>
ostream& operator<< ( ostream &out, const Base<T>& e )
{
    return out << e->data;
}

This friends only a single instantiation of the template, the one where the operator's template parameter matches the class's template parameter.

UPDATE: Unfortunately, it's illegal. Both MSVC and Comeau reject it. Which raises the question of why the original error message suggested pretty much EXACTLY this approach.

  • 6
    The C++ FAQ says that the friend line in the class declaration should have a <>, not a <T>. – Michael Kristofik Dec 17 '10 at 19:44
  • 2
    And apparently you're not supposed to need the template<> line before it. (No access to compiler right now, haven't tried it.) – Michael Kristofik Dec 17 '10 at 19:51
  • I believe the original error message is suggesting public: friend ostream& operator << <>(ostream &, const Base<T> &); – M.M Jun 5 '18 at 22:49
4

changing

friend ostream& operator << (ostream& out, const Base<T>& e);

to

friend ostream& operator << <T>(ostream& out, const Base<T>& e);

should work as well--I just solved an identical problem in this way.

0

changing

friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base<T> *e)`

To

template<T> friend ostream& operator << (ostream &out, Base *e)
-3

change

ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, Base<int> *e) {
    out << e->data;
    return out;
}

to

ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, T *e) {
    out << e->data;
    return out;
}
  • This definitely won't work. Besides giving employee.cpp:32: error: ‘T’ was not declared in this scope, even after making it a template in either .h or .cpp file, it won't work due to undefined symbols during linking. In addition I still get the warning. I want it to be like a normal template defined in a header file. – mike_b Oct 28 '10 at 4:57
  • I completely missed the class being Base at that point. Should just be T, but I see more complete answers, so I'll mod them up. – Bruce Armstrong Oct 28 '10 at 5:27

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