14

I have:

const props = {
  gallery: [],
  select: () => null,
  one: 1,
  two: 2,
}

I can destructure it with:

const {gallery, select, ...other} = props

I will have three variables now:

  • gallery = []
  • select = () => null
  • other = {one: 1,two: 2}

Is it possible to destucture to a specify grouping?

Something like this(this is not going to work but I hope it is clear to see what I am trying to do):

const {{gallery, select}: specific, ...other} = props

So I will have 2 variables:

  • specific = {gallery: [], select: () => null}
  • other = {one: 1,two: 2}

I could solve it at the higher level and build the props in this way:

const props = {
  specific: {
    gallery: [],
    select: () => null,
  },
  other: {
    one: 1,
    two: 2,
  }
}

But I am just wondering if this is possible with destructuring.

7
  • Probably could be done with spread properties but that's not available in ES6 yet – Sami Kuhmonen Nov 3 '16 at 11:00
  • @SamiKuhmonen It will never be available in ES6. ES6 specification was already finalized. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 3 '16 at 11:06
  • @Gothdo Ambiguous wording, I meant it's not available in ES version 6 yet, but may be in later ones. – Sami Kuhmonen Nov 3 '16 at 11:13
  • "I can destructur it with:" Not with ES6. Or any other specified version of ES. ...other is not (yet) a valid expression in any existing ES standard. – a better oliver Nov 3 '16 at 11:46
  • I updated the question to mention ES7 instead of ES6, because indeed, object rest syntax is not available in ES6 and proposed for ES7. – trincot Nov 3 '16 at 12:22
8

What about this? others contains also the specific data and I must access first to the props (maybe this could be improved), but I think that it basically groups while destructuring. It works because you can assign a default value when the attribute does not exist:

const props = {
  gallery: [],
  select: () => null,
  one: 1,
  two: 2,
}

const {gallery : gal, select : sel} = props;
const {specific: specific={gallery: gal, select: sel}, ...others} = props;

console.log(specific);
console.log(others);

EDIT

You can also change

const {gallery : gal, select : sel} = props;
const {specific: specific={gallery: gal, select: sel}, ...others} = props;

with:

const {specific: specific={gallery: props.gallery, select: props.select}, ...others} = props;

if you want it in one line.

Also, maioman's answer solves the problem I mentioned with others containing the specific data and doesn't directly access props.

8

Stretching syntax (and readability) to the limit you could do this:

(explanation to the code is in the comments)

const props = {
  gallery: [],
  select: () => null,
  one: 1,
  two: 2,
}

/** destructuring assignment **/
const {
  gallery, //extract the gallery prop
  select, //extract the select prop
  specific: specific={gallery, select},
  // create `specific` setting gallery and select props through default value assignment 
  ...others // assign to others the rest of non extracted props properties
} = props;

console.log(specific);
console.log(others);

In the end we get a gallery and a select object in the scope but we have succeeded to make them also properties of a new specific object.

Usage warning: object spread is still a proposal

4
  • I am pretty new to stackoverflow, so I'm not really sure and i might be wrong with my assumption, but it seems like you have used my answer and changed it... shouldn't you have commented in mine instead of posting a new answer if that's the case? – César Landesa Nov 3 '16 at 11:26
  • @CésarLandesa even if snippet shares same boilerplate, the solution is different, so IMHO it's ok... – maioman Nov 3 '16 at 11:32
  • But the solution is based on the same idea to resolve the main problem: using the default value to group when destructuring... then you improved that concept, for sure, but based on my code and main idea. I guess that it's a matter of perspective, but to me it looks like a modification to my idea, and not a different enough solution. – César Landesa Nov 3 '16 at 11:39
  • @CésarLandesa the way I see it is that destructuring assignment is useful when it's a single expression and this is the core of what I proposed vs. what you proposed – maioman Nov 3 '16 at 11:50

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