97

So I want to pass props to an Vue component, but I expect these props to change in future from inside that component e.g. when I update that Vue component from inside using AJAX. So they are only for initialization of component.

My cars-list Vue component element where I pass props with initial properties to single-car:

// cars-list.vue

<script>
    export default {
        data: function() {
            return {
                cars: [
                    {
                        color: 'red',
                        maxSpeed: 200,
                    },
                    {
                        color: 'blue',
                        maxSpeed: 195,
                    },
                ]
            }
        },
    }
</script>

<template>
    <div>
        <template v-for="car in cars">
            <single-car :initial-properties="car"></single-car>
        </template>
    </div>
</template>

The way I do it right now it that inside my single-car component I'm assigning this.initialProperties to my this.data.properties on created() initialization hook. And it works and is reactive.

// single-car.vue

<script>
    export default {
        data: function() {
            return {
                properties: {},
            }
        },
        created: function(){
            this.data.properties = this.initialProperties;
        },
    }
</script>

<template>
    <div>Car is in {{properties.color}} and has a max speed of {{properties.maxSpeed}}</div>
</template>

But my problem with that is that I don't know if that's a correct way to do it? Won't it cause me some troubles along the road? Or is there a better way to do it?

  • 13
    This is the most confusing thing about Vue in my opinion: Every data is two-way bound, but you can't pass data to components, you pass props, but you can't change the received props nor convert the props to data. Then what? One thing that I learned is that you should pass props down and trigger events up. That is, if the component wants to change the props it received, it should call an event and be "rerendered". But then you're left with a one-way binding exactly like React and I don't see the use for data then. Pretty confusing. – André Pena Nov 3 '16 at 17:56
  • 1
    Data is primarily intended for the private use of the component. Everything placed on it within the context of the component is reactive and can be bound to. The concept with props is to pass values into a component but keep the component from being able to silently introduce state changes in the parent by changing a passed value. It's better to make it explicit in an event as you indicated. This was a philosophy change from Vue 1.0 to 2.0. – David K. Hess Nov 3 '16 at 19:37
  • Today I've tried to start a thread over here: forum.vuejs.org/t/… – bgraves Feb 6 '19 at 14:36
101

Thanks to this https://github.com/vuejs/vuejs.org/pull/567 I know the answer now.

Method 1

Pass initial prop directly to the data. Like the example in updated docs:

props: ['initialCounter'],
data: function () {
    return {
        counter: this.initialCounter
    }
}

But have in mind if the passed prop is an object or array that is used in the parent component state any modification to that prop will result in the change in that parent component state.

Warning: this method is not recommended. It will make your components unpredictable. If you need to set parent data from child components either use state management like Vuex or use "v-model". https://vuejs.org/v2/guide/components.html#Using-v-model-on-Components

Method 2

If your initial prop is an object or array and if you don't want changes in children state propagate to parent state then just use e.g. Vue.util.extend [1] to make a copy of the props instead pointing it directly to children data, like this:

props: ['initialCounter'],
data: function () {
    return {
        counter: Vue.util.extend({}, this.initialCounter)
    }
}

Method 3

You can also use spread operator to clone the props. More details in the Igor answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/51911118/3143704

But have in mind that spread operators are not supported in older browsers and for better compatibility you'll need to transpile the code e.g. using babel.

Footnotes

[1] Have in mind this is an internal Vue utility and it may change with new versions. You might want to use other methods to copy that prop, see "How do I correctly clone a JavaScript object?".

My fiddle where I was testing it: https://jsfiddle.net/sm4kx7p9/3/

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    so it is ok practice to have changes propagated to parent component? – igor Apr 4 '18 at 21:12
  • 1
    @igor personally I'd try to avoid it as much as you can. It will make your components unpredictable. I think better way to get changes in parent component is to use "v-model" method where you $emit changes from your child component to parent component. vuejs.org/v2/guide/components.html#Using-v-model-on-Components – Dominik Serafin Apr 5 '18 at 14:27
  • yes but what about deep objects? should I deep copy? should I redesign my components to not use deep object? ie a prop with: { ok: 1, notOk: { meh: 2 } } if set to an internal data with any of the previous cloning method would still change the prop notOk.meh – Nikso Oct 4 '18 at 4:34
  • 1
    Thanks for the excellent question and answer @DominikSerafin. This perfectly illustrates the achilles heal of Vue.js. As a framework it handles componentization so well, but passing data amongst the comps is a major PITA. Just look at the nomenclature nightmare created. So now I need to prefix all my props with initial just to be able to use them within my comp. It would be so much cleaner if we could just pass a prop called data to any comp and have it automagically propagate the localized data within without all this initialPropName madness. – AJB Sep 16 '19 at 8:55
  • 1
    @DominikSerafin I hear what you're saying, and you're not wrong. But write a form-builder app using Vue.js and you'll quickly see what I mean. I'm actually in the process of changing my technique of sharing data from prop --> comp.data to using Vue-Stash for all data (or Vuex would work too). But now I'm just bouncing my data off the window object as I used to do before the "modern" JS frameworks imposed their opinion on me. So it begs the question: What's the point of the comp.data property at all? – AJB Sep 16 '19 at 9:32
24

In companion to @dominik-serafin's answer:

In case you are passing an object, you can easily clone it using spread operator(ES6 Syntax):

 props: {
   record: {
     type: Object,
     required: true
   }
 },

data () { // opt. 1
  return {
    recordLocal: {...this.record}
  }
},

computed: { // opt. 2
  recordLocal () {
    return {...this.record}
  }
},

But the most important is to remember to use opt. 2 in case you are passing a computed value, or more than that an asynchronous value. Otherwise the local value will not update.

Demo:

Vue.component('card', { 
  template: '#app2',
  props: {
    test1: null,
    test2: null
  },
  data () { // opt. 1
    return {
      test1AsData: {...this.test1}
    }
  },
  computed: { // opt. 2
    test2AsComputed () {
      return {...this.test2}
    }
  }
})

new Vue({
  el: "#app1",
  data () {
    return {
      test1: {1: 'will not update'},
      test2: {2: 'will update after 1 second'}
    }
  },
  mounted () {
    setTimeout(() => {
      this.test1 = {1: 'updated!'}
      this.test2 = {2: 'updated!'}
    }, 1000)
  }
})
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/vue@2.5.17/dist/vue.js"></script>

<div id="app1">
  <card :test1="test1" :test2="test2"></card>
</div>

<template id="app2">
  <div>
    test1 as data: {{test1AsData}}
    <hr />
    test2 as computed: {{test2AsComputed}}
  </div>
</template>

https://jsfiddle.net/nomikos3/eywraw8t/281070/

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey @igor-parra, it seems like you've submited duplicated answers. And also it might be good to mention that spread operator isn't supported in all browsers and might need transpiling step for better compatibility. Otherwise it looks great - thanks for adding this alternative method! – Dominik Serafin Aug 20 '18 at 9:20
  • @dominik-serafin Yes, you right, I added a reference to ES6. In webpack based applications it is so easy to have preconfigured babel to make full use of modern javascript. – Igor Parra Aug 20 '18 at 21:38
  • recordLocal: [...this.record] (in my case record is an array) did not work for me - after loading and inspecting the vue component, record contains the items and recordLocal was an empty array. – Christian Jun 30 at 19:56
  • When I use it though COMPUTED property it goes well, for me when I try to set inside the data it is not working =(... But I got it using computed – felipe muner Jul 17 at 6:26
  • Be carful. The spread operator only shallow clones, so for objects that contain objects or arrays you will still copy pointers instead of getting a new copy. I use cloneDeep from lodash. – Cindy Conway Jul 17 at 17:33
13

I believe you are doing it right because it is what's stated in the docs.

Define a local data property that uses the prop’s initial value as its initial value

https://vuejs.org/guide/components.html#One-Way-Data-Flow

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    For pass-by-value props that is fine. In this case it's an object, so changing it will affect the parent. From that page: "Note that objects and arrays in JavaScript are passed by reference, so if the prop is an array or object, mutating the object or array itself inside the child component will affect parent state." – Jake Oct 1 '18 at 0:56
  • This works for me and is clearly documented. this line in the answer above conflicts with vue documentation as far as I can tell "Warning: this method is not recommended. It will make your components unpredictable. If you need to set parent data from child components either use state management like Vuex or use "v-model". " – Nathaniel Rink Apr 26 '19 at 17:32
  • So after 4 years and hundreds of hours of learning curve I'm right back where I started just bouncing vars off the window object. – AJB Sep 16 '19 at 9:21

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