I can't seem to figure out the command for changing the x- and y-axes to go from 200-800 in increments of 100. (new to R, don't know how to provide large amounts of data)

     SAT <- read.csv(file.choose(), header = TRUE)
    SAT2 <- na.exclude(SAT)
    SAT.MV <- SAT2[,1:2]
    plot(SAT.MV$VSAT,SAT.MV$MSAT,main="Math and Verbal SAT Scores",xlab="Verbal Score",
ylab="Math Score")
    head(SAT.MV)
    SAT.MV.3means <- kmeans(SAT.MV,centers=3)
    SAT.MV.3means$centers
    SAT.MV.3means$cluster
    plot(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 1, ], col = "red", 
         xlim=c(min(SAT.MV[ ,1]),max(SAT.MV[ ,1])),
         ylim=c(min(SAT.MV[ ,2]),max(SAT.MV[ ,2])))
    points(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 2,], col = "blue")
    points(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 3,], col = "seagreen")
    points(SAT.MV.3means$centers,pch=2, col = "black")
            plot(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 1, ], col = "red", 
             xlim=c(min(SAT.MV[ ,1]),max(SAT.MV[ ,1])),
             ylim=c(min(SAT.MV[ ,2]),max(SAT.MV[ ,2])))
        points(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 2,], col = "blue")
        points(SAT.MV[SAT.MV.3means$cluster == 3,], col = "seagreen")
        points(SAT.MV.3means$centers,pch=2, col = "black")

closed as off-topic by alistaire, 李哲源, zx8754, Jaap, David Arenburg Nov 4 '16 at 7:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – alistaire, 李哲源, zx8754, Jaap, David Arenburg
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    Can you please include data and/or code that will provide us with a reproducible example ? – Ben Bolker Nov 3 '16 at 22:59
  • Thanks for trying, but this is still not reproducible. We don't know what file you're reading ... If you read the link in my comment above, you'll see that "reproducible example" usually doesn't/shouldn't mean giving us all of your data - it means boiling your problem down to something simpler/shorter but still demonstrates your issue ... – Ben Bolker Nov 3 '16 at 23:12
  • @BenBolker As a math student, not a programmer, and having only taken one computer science class, I still am not understanding how I'm supposed to make a sample code for a huge data set. Or why that's necessary when I've provided the scale I need for the axes. I just don't know what code can change the scale of the axes. – pmk1007 Nov 3 '16 at 23:28
  • 1
    The problem with not having a reproducible example is that it makes answerers work harder (to make one up themselves so they can show/test that their answer works), and the lack of a reproducible example often conceals ambiguity in your question. That may not be true in this case, but it's why experienced SO users will insist so strongly on getting a reproducible example. – Ben Bolker Nov 3 '16 at 23:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suppose I have a small data set:

dd <- data.frame(x=c(300,700,1000),y=c(-100,200,700))

I want to plot this data on a set of scales that might not match the scale of the data (that is, R's automatic rules might not work as I want).

## xlim, ylim set bounds: axes=FALSE turns off axes
plot(y~x,data=dd,xlim=c(200,800),ylim=c(200,800),axes=FALSE)

Now draw the axes manually:

ax <- seq(200,800,by=100)  ## same for both axes
axis(side=1,at=ax)         ## side=1 -> bottom
axis(side=2,at=ax)         ## side=2 -> left
box()  ## to draw the bounding box

In this example, all but one of the points in the data set are actually excluded from the plot:

enter image description here

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