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I'm working on a form-input library. My goal is to have a re-usable set of validators which can be applied to a set of form fields. I'm running into difficulty specialising my generic protocol. The full error from the code below is protocol 'FieldValidator' can only be used as a generic constraint because it has Self or associated type requirements.

Complete playground-ready code:

import Foundation

protocol FieldValidator {
  associatedtype InputType: Any
  func validate(input value: InputType)
}

struct EmailValidator: FieldValidator {
  func validate(input value: String) {}
}

enum Field {
  case string(_: [FieldValidator])
  case integer(_: [FieldValidator])
}

let emailField: Field = .string([EmailValidator()])

What I've tried

I understand that in the Field enum I can't just throw in a FieldValidator because it needs to know what InputType of validator it requires. I expect that I need to tell it somehow, maybe something like this:

case string(_: [FieldValidator<String>])
case integer(_: [FieldValidator<Int>])

or this:

case string(_: [FieldValidator where InputType == String])
case integer(_: [FieldValidator where InputType == Int])

but these doesn't work. Is there a way to keep this kind of architecture?

Edit using struct instead of enum for field types:

struct StringField {
  typealias InputType = String
  let validators: [FieldValidator]
}

I still appear to have the same problem defining the set of validators (which must be provided when the Field is initialised): protocol 'FieldValidator' can only be used as a generic constraint because it has Self or associated type requirements.

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  • 1
    Call me dense, but I'm not grasping what the enum is for.
    – matt
    Nov 4 '16 at 0:54
  • It's just the way I chose to define the different types of fields available. It also is used to determine the type of value passed into and retrieved from the form field. It could be a series of structs, I suppose: struct StringField, struct IntField. Nov 4 '16 at 1:07
  • @matt I have had a quick go of using a struct or class rather than an enum, but I had no luck with either of those. Is there a better option? Nov 4 '16 at 1:11
  • I still haven't understood what you're trying to do. There are an infinite number of types of fields available. InputType is unrestricted, so anyone can adopt FieldValidator and resolve InputType as anything at all. I don't see where the notion of "string-or-int" comes from or how it relates to your use of a generic here.
    – matt
    Nov 4 '16 at 1:12
  • I realise in the original code that InputType is unrestricted. I figured that was actually the source of the error: the compiler doesn't know what type the FieldValidator expects because of the associated type requirements. I also figured that there was a way I could tell the compiler what type to expect, through something like <Type> or where InputType == Type. I suppose what I'm trying to do is provide a mechanism by which someone can define a Field, define what type of value it holds, and define a set of reusable Validators which will operate on that value and determine if it's valid. Nov 4 '16 at 1:18
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I suppose what I'm trying to do is provide a mechanism by which someone can define a Field, define what type of value it holds, and define a set of reusable Validators which will operate on that value and determine if it's valid

You might be after something like this; it's stupid but effective, especially if there are not very many field types in question:

protocol FieldValidator {
    associatedtype T
    func validate(input:T)
}

class StringValidator : FieldValidator {
    func validate(input:String) { fatalError("must override me") }
}

class IntValidator : FieldValidator {
    func validate(input:Int) { fatalError("must override me") }
}

class ActualStringValidator : StringValidator {
    override func validate(input:String) { print(input)}
}

enum Field {
    case string([StringValidator])
    case int([IntValidator])
}

As you can see, I've simply used the class hierarchy to solve the problem (so that we don't have to do type erasure). In particular, it is now legal to say:

let f = Field.string([ActualStringValidator()])

Here's how to test it:

let f = Field.string([ActualStringValidator()])
if case Field.string(let arr) = f {
    for thing in arr {
        thing.validate(input:"howdy")
    }
}
3
  • Thank you, this works just fine. Shame about class but at least it does the job nicely. I found it's possible to define the enum as case string([FieldValidator<String>]) and then ActualStringValidator can just inherit FieldValidator<String> without needing to have an intermediary. Nov 4 '16 at 1:54
  • It is a shame about class for sure, but I'm fairly certain that the struct approach would have require type erasure, which is a little hairy. If you want, I'll try to work out that solution (but I'd rather not).
    – matt
    Nov 4 '16 at 1:56
  • Happy not to! Thank you Nov 4 '16 at 1:59

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