Is the following code pattern reasonable when using traits in templated code where both alternative implementations are always compilable?

Reading the code seems clearer than doing other shenanigans to conditionally compile (but then perhaps I'm just not familiar enough with those shenanigans).

template<typename T>
class X
{
    void do_something() noexcept(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value)
    {
        if (std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value)
        {
            // some short code that assumes T's copy constructor won't throw
        }
        else
        {
            // some longer code with try/catch blocks and more complexity
        }
    }

    // many other methods
};

(The added complexity is in part to provide the strong exception guarantee.)

I know this code will work, but is it reasonable to expect the compiler to eliminate the constant-false branches and do inlining etc for the noexcept case (where much simpler than the other case)? I'm hoping for something that would be as efficient in the noexcept case as writing the method with only that first block as body (and vice versa, though I'm less worried about the complex case).

If this isn't the right way to do it, can someone please enlighten me to the recommended syntax?

  • 4
    You should remember that if() { ... } else { ... } is always evaluated at run time, and may evaluate non matching types when a template is instantiated. Have a lookup for std::enable_if and SFINAE. – πάντα ῥεῖ Nov 4 '16 at 6:08
  • 1
    I wrote up an example at the Godbolt Compiler Explorer which indicates that gcc will remove the unused branch in each instantiation even with no optimization: godbolt.org/g/IfkAbw And will remove practically everything with -O3: godbolt.org/g/t26gU4 – mskfisher Nov 4 '16 at 13:25
  • 11
    @πάνταῥεῖ No, it isn't always evaluated at run time. It is in the abstract machine, but the compiler is free to as-if it was evaluated at run time in the actual machine. And every mature compiler does dead code elimination and constant branch detection in its sleep. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Nov 4 '16 at 14:13
  • It's not even a real optimization anymore. A compiler has to decide where to put the generated code. The logical answer is "near its caller" if there is a single caller. Therefore generating a list of possible callers is typically done before the generated code is even emitted. Unreachable branches by definition have no caller, and it's not a real optimization to just omit them. – MSalters Nov 4 '16 at 16:36
up vote 21 down vote accepted

[...] is it reasonable to expect the compiler to eliminate the constant-false branches and do inlining etc for the noexcept case (where much simpler than the other case)?

It could be, but I wouldn't rely on that for you cannot control it.


If you want to remove the if/else, you can sfinae the return type and clean up the noexcept qualifier.
As an example:

template<typename T>
class X {
    template<typename U = T>
    std::enable_if_t<std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value>
    do_something()
    noexcept(true)
    {}

    template<typename U = T>
    std::enable_if_t<not std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value>
    do_something()
    noexcept(false)
    {}
};

The drawbacks are that you have now two member functions template.
Not sure it fits your requirements.

If you are allowed to use features from C++17, if constexpr is probably the way to go and you don't have to break your method in two member functions anymore.

Another approach could be based on tag-dispatching the noexceptness of your type.
As an example:

template<typename T>
class X {
    void do_something(std::true_type)
    noexcept(true)
    {}

    void do_something(std::false_type)
    noexcept(false)
    {}

    void do_something()
    noexcept(do_something(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>{}))
    { do_something(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>{}); }
};

I know, sfinae is not a verb, but to sfinae something sounds just so good.

  • And the downvote is for ... ? Knowing it would help to improve the answer. – skypjack Nov 4 '16 at 7:52
  • I guess the downvote is because OP is aware of all these tricks (shenanigans) and the question is whether he can expect the same result with less effort on his side. – Leon Nov 4 '16 at 8:12
  • 2
    Sfinae'd the hell out of it. The last two lines do make me cry for noexcept(auto) though. Also, you can directly wrap std::is_...<T>::value inside std::integral_constant<bool, ...> (and soon std::boolean_constant<...>). – Quentin Nov 4 '16 at 13:49
  • 1
    @Quentin noexcept(auto) would be great actually. – skypjack Nov 4 '16 at 15:13
  • @Quentin (and skypjack): All boolean type traits (is_...) derive from either true_type or false_type, so it would simply be do_something(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>{}) (or (), however you prefer). – Xeo Nov 5 '16 at 3:08

is it reasonable to expect the compiler to eliminate the constant-false branches and do inlining etc for the noexcept case [...]?

Yes. That being said, the constant-false branch has to be instantiated, which might or might not cause the compiler to instantiate a bunch of symbols that you do not need (and then you need to rely on the linker to remove those).

I would still go with the SFINAE shenanigans (actually tag-dispatching), which can be done really easily in C++11.

template<typename T>
class X
{
    void do_something() noexcept(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value)
    {
        do_something_impl(std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>() ); 
    }

    void do_something_impl( std::true_type /* nothrow_copy_constructible */ )
    {
        // some short code that assumes T's copy constructor won't throw
    }

    void do_something_impl( std::false_type /* nothrow_copy_constructible */)
    {
        // some longer code with try/catch blocks and more complexity
    }

    // many other methods
};

If you are going to check for nothrow_copy_constructor in all the other methods, you can consider specializing the entire class:

template<typename T, class = std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible_t<T> >
class X
{
   //throw copy-ctor implementation
};

template<typename T>
class X<T, std::true_type>
{
   // noexcept copy-ctor implementation
};

Is it reasonable to expect the compiler to eliminate the constant-false branches?

Yes, dead code elimination is one of the simplest optimizations.

... and do inlining etc for the noexcept case?

My first impulse was to answer "No, you can't rely on that, since it depends on where the inlining pass sits in the optimization flow relative to the dead code elimination step".

But upon more reflection, I can't see why a mature compiler at a high enough optimization level won't perform dead code elimination both before and after the inlining step. So this expectation should be reasonable too.

However, guessing with regard to optimizations is never a sure thing. Go for the simple implementation and arrive at correctly functioning code. Then measure its performance and check whether your assumptions were true. If they weren't - reegineering the implementation for your situation won't take significantly more time than if you went down the guaranteed path from the very beginning.

  • This answer deserves much more up-votes ;) – Narek Atayan Nov 5 '16 at 11:10

Every mature compiler does dead code elimination. Every mature compiler detects constant branches, and dead codes the other branch.

You can create a function with a dozen template arguments which uses naive if checks in its body and look at the resulting assumbly -- there is not going to be a problem.

If you do things like create static variables or thread_local or instantiate symbols, these are all harder to eliminate.

Inlining is a bit tricker, because compilers tend to give up inlining at some point; the more complex the code, the more likely the compiler gives up before inlining it.

In C++17 you can upgrade your if to the constexpr version. But in C++14 and 11, your code will do just fine. It is simpler and easier to read than the alternatives.

It is somewhat fragile, but if it breaks it usually does so at compile time in a noisy way.

but is it reasonable to expect the compiler to eliminate the constant-false branches

No. All branches will be evaluated by the compiler. You may try to use if constexpr from c++17.

What you are trying to achieve is SFINAE.

  • 3
    The compiler will evaluate (parse) the branch, but the optimizer can eliminate a constant-false condition, as @Leon's answer says. – mskfisher Nov 4 '16 at 12:54

You could try to implement constexpr_if yourself. c++11 solution could look as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <bool V>
struct constexpr_if {
   template <class Lambda, class... Args>
   static int then(Lambda lambda, Args... args) {
      return 0;
   }
};

template <>
struct constexpr_if<true> {
   template <class Lambda, class... Args>
   static auto then(Lambda lambda, Args... args) -> decltype(lambda(args...)) {
       return lambda(args...);
   }

   static int then(...) {
       return 0;
   }
};

struct B {
   B() {}
   B(const B &) noexcept {}
   void do_something() {
      std::cout << "B::do_something()" << std::endl;
   }
};

struct C {
   C() {}
   C(const C &) noexcept {}
   void do_something_else() {
      std::cout << "C::do_something_else()" << std::endl;
   }
};

struct D {
   D() {}
   D(const D &) throw(int) {}
   void do_something_else() {
      std::cout << "D::do_something_else()" << std::endl;
   }
};

template <class T>
struct X {
   void do_something() {
      T t;
      constexpr_if<std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value>::then([](B &b) {
         b.do_something();
      }, t);
      constexpr_if<std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value>::then([](C &c) {
         c.do_something_else();
      }, t);
      constexpr_if<!std::is_nothrow_copy_constructible<T>::value>::then([](D &d) {
         d.do_something_else();
      }, t);
   }
};

int main() {
   X<B> x;
   x.do_something();
   X<C> xx;
   xx.do_something();
   X<D> xxx;
   xxx.do_something();
}

Output:

B::do_something()
C::do_something_else()
D::do_something_else()

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