0

I have two actionfilterattributes and an action

public class BaseAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute{

   protected bool _something
   public BaseAttribute(bool something){
       _something = something
   }
   public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext){
      _something = true;
      Console.WriteLine(_something);
   }
}


public class ChildAttribute : BaseAttribute{
   public ChildAttribute(bool somethingChild): base(somethingChild){
   }

   public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext){
      Console.WriteLine(_something);

      if(!_something)
           base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
   }
}

[ChildAttribute (false)]
public ActionResult SomeMethodCalledByAngular(){
  ......
}

when I call the SomeMethodCalledByAngular for the first time, the _something variable gets updated as expected... it becomes true, but without refreshing the page and I hit the actionresult again, the value is still true. Is that accurate? How do I make sure that it gets reset to the original value that I passed when I decorated it on the Actionresult or false?

EDIT: So I'm basically trying to update that variable depending on a table's field that is grabbed from the database. If for example the user did not refresh the page, but the value of that said field changed, I want to update the variable. That actionfilter becomes like a security filter for requests, since I use the actions like an API, at least for specific controllers.

EDIT2:

Just to expand more. Let's say I go to a page with a button, and that button can perform a post request to an action. But that action can only be accessed if you are SUBSCRIBED. Let's take this model

public class User{
   public int Id {get;set;}
   public DateTime SubscribedFrom {get;set;}
   public DateTime SubscribedTo {get;set;}
}

Basically, everytime the actionfilter gets triggered, I need to check if the user is still within the subscription dates. If not, the action should not be accessed therefore returning an error.

So I'm going to have

public class BaseAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute{

   protected bool _subscribed
   public BaseAttribute(bool subscribed){
       _subscribed= subscribed
   }
   public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext){
      User user = <get the user details>
      if(user.SubscribedFrom < DateTime.Now && user.SubscribedTo > DateTime.Now)
      _subscribed = true;
      Console.WriteLine(_something);
   }
}


public class ChildAttribute : BaseAttribute{
   public ChildAttribute(bool somethingChild): base(somethingChild){
   }

   public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext){

      // do a check on another layer of security and see if there's an override. if there is not, _subscribed remains false, then proceeds to the base filter to validate the user subscription

      if(!_subscribed)
           base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
   }
}
  • This happens because the attribute's constructor is called only once and as long as the application runs it exists. Basically it's a singleton. That is why it keeps the same value. Tell me more about what exactly you are trying to achieve with the _something variable. – Jakub Rusilko Nov 4 '16 at 6:48
  • Ah, that's interesting to know! Edited with more info. let me know if it makes sense. Thanks! – gdubs Nov 4 '16 at 13:05
  • Thanks for the additional explanation but I'm afraid I still don't understand. However, no matter what you are trying to do, I don't think this is a good way to go. The problem is that you have no guarantee that the application will be up between requests (so no guarantee to preserve the value of _something). In your case the solution should probably be to use something that is designed to store information between requests, like for example the session. – Jakub Rusilko Nov 4 '16 at 13:36
  • updated it again. I cant do sessions since I'm planning to have an admin account that may or may not need to update the Subscription properties. This is more for testing and maybe cancelled subscriptions. – gdubs Nov 4 '16 at 15:39
0

Ok, now I get it :) However, in my opinion, this is not a clean design. The problem is that you have this variable that is used by both classes and this logic is a bit difficult to reason about. But I don't think you need this variable for what you are doing. I redesigned this a little bit. See if this works for you:

public class BaseValidationCheckAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
    {
        public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            User user = < get the user details >
            if (IsSubscriptionValid(user))
            {
               DoThings(); 
            }
        }

        protected bool IsSubscriptionValid(User user)
        {
            return (user.SubscribedFrom < DateTime.Now && user.SubscribedTo > DateTime.Now);
        }

        protected void DoThings()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("doing something...");
        }
    }

    public class ValidationWithOverrideCheckAttribute : BaseValidationCheckAttribute
    {
        public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            User user = < get the user details >
            //first checking the override and if true we don't even care about the base validation, if false, then we also check the subscription validation 
            if (IsSubscriptionOverride(user) || IsSubscriptionValid(user))
            {
                DoThings();
            }
        }

        private bool IsSubscriptionOverride(User user)
        {
            //here check whatever to see if we should override the base subscription validation
            return false;
        }
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.