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I have several virtual machines installed on my computer, to which I connect via ssh:

ssh vm1@localhost

or

ssh vm2@localhost

So every time I connect to different vm I need to edit my ~/.ssh/known_hosts file in order to get rid of: “WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!” message.

Is there any way to trust automatically all VMs on localhost?

  • How should those commands connect to different systems? They all connect to your local host. – arkascha Nov 4 '16 at 10:46
  • @arkascha — Presumably through port forwarding. – Quentin Nov 4 '16 at 10:46
  • @Quentin Even so, why should that port forwarding behave different depending on the account name? – arkascha Nov 4 '16 at 10:48
  • @arkascha — It doesn't. The change is behaviour is due to one VM being shutdown and another one being started up … so the port forwarding goes to a different host. – Quentin Nov 4 '16 at 10:50
  • I'm using VirtualBox, so when I need vm2, I'm shutting down vm1 and vice versa – eparvan Nov 4 '16 at 10:50
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In your configuration (e.g. ~/.ssh/config) you can trash the known hosts for a specific hostname:

Host localhost
        HostName localhost
        UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null
        StrictHostKeyChecking=no

credit

  • It works, thanks! – eparvan Nov 4 '16 at 10:59

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