35

I am currently trying to convert my received JSON Object into a TypeScript class with the same attributes and I cannot get it to work. What am I doing wrong?

Employee Class

export class Employee{
    firstname: string;
    lastname: string;
    birthdate: Date;
    maxWorkHours: number;
    department: string;
    permissions: string;
    typeOfEmployee: string;
    note: string;
    lastUpdate: Date;
}

Employee String

{
    "department": "<anystring>",
    "typeOfEmployee": "<anystring>",
    "firstname": "<anystring>",
    "lastname": "<anystring>",
    "birthdate": "<anydate>",
    "maxWorkHours": <anynumber>,
    "username": "<anystring>",
    "permissions": "<anystring>",
    "lastUpdate": "<anydate>"
    //I will add note later
}

My Attempt

let e: Employee = new Employee();

Object.assign(e, {
    "department": "<anystring>",
    "typeOfEmployee": "<anystring>",
    "firstname": "<anystring>",
    "lastname": "<anystring>",
    "birthdate": "<anydate>",
    "maxWorkHours": 3,
    "username": "<anystring>",
    "permissions": "<anystring>",
    "lastUpdate": "<anydate>"
});

console.log(e);

Link to Typescript Playground

29

The reason that the compiler lets you cast the object returned from JSON.parse to a class is because typescript is based on structural subtyping.
You don't really have an instance of an Employee, you have an object (as you see in the console) which has the same properties.

A simpler example:

class A {
    constructor(public str: string, public num: number) {}
}

function logA(a: A) {
    console.log(`A instance with str: "${ a.str }" and num: ${ a.num }`);
}

let a1 = { str: "string", num: 0, boo: true };
let a2 = new A("stirng", 0);
logA(a1); // no errors
logA(a2);

(code in playground)

There's no error because a1 satisfies type A because it has all of its properties, and the logA function can be called with no runtime errors even if what it receives isn't an instance of A as long as it has the same properties.

That works great when your classes are simple data objects and have no methods, but once you introduce methods then things tend to break:

class A {
    constructor(public str: string, public num: number) { }

    multiplyBy(x: number): number {
        return this.num * x;
    }
}

// this won't compile:
let a1 = { str: "string", num: 0, boo: true } as A; // Error: Type '{ str: string; num: number; boo: boolean; }' cannot be converted to type 'A'

// but this will:
let a2 = { str: "string", num: 0 } as A;

// and then you get a runtime error:
a2.multiplyBy(4); // Error: Uncaught TypeError: a2.multiplyBy is not a function

(code in playground)


Edit

This works just fine:

const employeeString = '{"department":"<anystring>","typeOfEmployee":"<anystring>","firstname":"<anystring>","lastname":"<anystring>","birthdate":"<anydate>","maxWorkHours":0,"username":"<anystring>","permissions":"<anystring>","lastUpdate":"<anydate>"}';
let employee1 = JSON.parse(employeeString);
console.log(employee1);

(code in playground)

If you're trying to use JSON.parse on your object when it's not a string:

let e = {
    "department": "<anystring>",
    "typeOfEmployee": "<anystring>",
    "firstname": "<anystring>",
    "lastname": "<anystring>",
    "birthdate": "<anydate>",
    "maxWorkHours": 3,
    "username": "<anystring>",
    "permissions": "<anystring>",
    "lastUpdate": "<anydate>"
}
let employee2 = JSON.parse(e);

Then you'll get the error because it's not a string, it's an object, and if you already have it in this form then there's no need to use JSON.parse.

But, as I wrote, if you're going with this way then you won't have an instance of the class, just an object that has the same properties as the class members.

If you want an instance then:

let e = new Employee();
Object.assign(e, {
    "department": "<anystring>",
    "typeOfEmployee": "<anystring>",
    "firstname": "<anystring>",
    "lastname": "<anystring>",
    "birthdate": "<anydate>",
    "maxWorkHours": 3,
    "username": "<anystring>",
    "permissions": "<anystring>",
    "lastUpdate": "<anydate>"
});
  • So i basically can cast any object string to an object or interface if it has the same (but it must not have all) properties as the object or interface? And this works for both. But if I need methods I have to use a class instead of an interface and than I can only call the methods of my classes objects is they were made through the constructor of the class. Right? And if can change my employee class to an interface rightaway because I just need it for typisation? – moessi774 Nov 6 '16 at 10:13
  • But can I also cast an object string to an object or interface if the string has more properties than the object? Because in my case this is not working. – moessi774 Nov 6 '16 at 10:27
  • 1
    Check my revised answer – Nitzan Tomer Nov 6 '16 at 19:21
  • 1
    I can't understand what you mean. Please update your question with this info and explain what you did and what you got back – Nitzan Tomer Nov 7 '16 at 12:41
  • 1
    Using your exact code I get: Employee {department: "<anystring>", typeOfEmployee: "<anystring>", firstname: "<anystring>", lastname: "<anystring>", birthdate: "<anydate>"…} which is fine – Nitzan Tomer Nov 7 '16 at 13:10
33

If you use a TypeScript interface instead of a class, things are simpler:

export interface Employee {
    typeOfEmployee_id: number;
    department_id: number;
    permissions_id: number;
    maxWorkHours: number;
    employee_id: number;
    firstname: string;
    lastname: string;
    username: string;
    birthdate: Date;
    lastUpdate: Date;
}

let jsonObj: any = JSON.parse(employeeString); // string to generic object first
let employee: Employee = <Employee>jsonObj;

If you want a class, however, simple casting won't work. For example:

class Foo {
    name: string;
    public pump() { }
}

let jsonObj: any = JSON.parse('{ "name":"hello" }');
let fObj: Foo = <Foo>jsonObj;
fObj.pump(); // crash, method is undefined!

For a class, you'll have to write a constructor which accepts a JSON string/object and then iterate through the properties to assign each member manually, like this:

class Foo {
    name: string;

    constructor(jsonStr: string) {
        let jsonObj: any = JSON.parse(jsonStr);
        for (let prop in jsonObj) {
            this[prop] = jsonObj[prop];
        }
    }
}

let fObj: Foo = new Foo(theJsonString);
  • 1
    This seems logical to me. I just saw that my JSON Converter at the source sends the id's because the employee class there has got them. But it should send the values which the id's point at. I will adjust that and than try to cast it like in your example. – moessi774 Nov 4 '16 at 11:34
  • I adjusted the json string and updated my question above. I also implemented your solution but it is still not recognized as Employee and throws a type mismatch error. – moessi774 Nov 4 '16 at 11:57
  • @moessi774 I just updated me answer, I guess I exactly understood your question now. – Rodrigo Nov 4 '16 at 13:07
  • I did not know about interfaces for now. So if I just use my class for typisation a interface would be much smarter. Thank you for your answer. – moessi774 Nov 6 '16 at 10:15
  • This good answer is from 2016. With ES6 you can use Object.assign(this, input) inside a function in your object to avoid manually iterating the properties. You still need to take care of object nesting manually, though. – Guillermo Prandi Apr 10 at 18:02
5

Your JSON data have some properties that you have not in your class. For mapping You can do simple custom mapping

export class Employe{ ////
    static parse(json: string) {
           var data = JSON.parse(json);
            return new Employe(data.typeOfEmployee_id, data.firstName.. and others);
       }

}

and also specifying constructor in your

Employee

class

  • This looks like a good solution. I try it some more times with my current way. If it is still not working I implement yours. – moessi774 Nov 4 '16 at 11:59
4
let employee = <Employee>JSON.parse(employeeString);

Remember: Strong typings is compile time only since javascript doesn't support it.

  • 2
    What's the difference between your example and his? – goenning Nov 4 '16 at 11:16
1

First of all you need to be sure that all attributes of that comes from the service are named the same in your class. Then you can parse the object and after that assign it to your new variable, something like this:

const parsedJSON = JSON.parse(serverResponse);
const employeeObj: Employee = parsedJSON as Employee;

Try that!

  • This solution has one big problem - not support to nested object – kris_IV Feb 5 '18 at 19:34

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