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I am creating barplots with standard deviation bars using ggplot2. My data frame is quite large but here is a truncated version for example:

SampleName  Target.ID   Maj.Allele.Freq SD  AVG.MAF
W15-P2-1    rs1005533   99.74811083 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-2    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-3    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-4    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-1    rs1005533   99.94819995 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-2    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-3    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-4    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-1    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-2    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-3    rs1005533   99.90044798 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-4    rs1005533   99.72375691 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-1    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-2    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-3    rs1005533   100 24.98883743 93.70753223
W21-P2-4    rs1005533   0   24.98883743 93.70753223
W15-P2-1    rs10092491  52.40641711 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-2    rs10092491  53.69923603 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-3    rs10092491  52.56689284 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-4    rs10092491  50.11764706 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-1    rs10092491  50.30094583 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-2    rs10092491  50.96277279 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-3    rs10092491  50.94102886 1.340954343 51.8604281
W15-P2-4    rs10092491  51.2849162  1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-1    rs10092491  53.56976202 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-2    rs10092491  50.27861123 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-3    rs10092491  52.8358209  1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-4    rs10092491  51.42585551 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-1    rs10092491  52.77890467 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-2    rs10092491  52.89017341 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-3    rs10092491  53.70786517 1.340954343 51.8604281
W21-P2-4    rs10092491  50  1.340954343 51.8604281

Because the average values in the last column (AVG.MAF) can produce standard deviation bars that exceed the maximum of 100, the plot shows the bars beyond the limit on the y axis of 100.

Example Standard Deviation bars extend beyond 100.

Here is the code to create the above plot:

pe1 = ggplot(half1, aes(x=Target.ID, y=AVG.MAF))+
 geom_bar(stat = "identity", position = "dodge", colour = "black", 
 width = 0.5, fill = "yellowgreen")+xlab("")+
 ylab("Average Major Allele Frequency")+
 labs(title="Allele Balance AmpliSeq Identity Sample P2")+
 geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = AVG.MAF-SD, ymax = AVG.MAF+SD), 
 width = 0.4, position = position_dodge(0.9), 
   size = 0.6)+
 theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust = 1, vjust = .5))

I tried truncating the plot using coord_cartesian but this kind of makes the plot look like I am hiding some data:

Here the top of the standard deviation bars is cut off

Here is the code to create the plot with the standard deviation bars cut off:

pe1 = ggplot(half1, aes(x=Target.ID, y=AVG.MAF))+geom_bar(stat = "identity", position = "dodge", colour = "black", width = 0.5, fill = "yellowgreen")+xlab("")+ylab("Average Major Allele Frequency")+labs(title="Allele Balance AmpliSeq Identity Sample P2")+geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = AVG.MAF-SD, ymax = AVG.MAF+SD), width = 0.4, position = position_dodge(0.9), size = 0.6)+theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust = 1, vjust = .5))+coord_cartesian(ylim=c(0,100))

It seems like there has to be a way to restrict the standard deviation bars to my intended ymax of 100 and still keep the top horizontal bar visible in the plot. Does any one know how to do this?

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  • 7
    why do you want to misrepresent the standard deviation by truncating the top of the std dev bar?
    – Nate
    Nov 4 '16 at 15:11
  • 1
    Would ...geom_errorbar(aes(ymin = AVG.MAF-SD, ymax = pmin(AVG.MAF+SD,100)... do what you want? Almost certainly you're now under-representing uncertainty though, probably because the underlying error model used is inappropriate.
    – Miff
    Nov 4 '16 at 15:15
  • @NathanDay and Miff you have both given me something to think about. Thank you both for your comments and the possible solution.
    – aminards
    Nov 4 '16 at 15:27
  • 1
    To connect to Nathan Day's comment, maybe standard deviation is not really what you should be after, how about a bootstrapped confidence interval if that is something you can obtain? Nov 4 '16 at 15:28
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In addition to the issues people have raised in the comments, here are a couple of other considerations:

  1. You don't need to add a column that repeats the mean for every row of your data. Instead, you can calculate and plot the mean within ggplot, using the actual data values in Maj.Allele.Freq. (In fact, by using a column for the y-value that repeats the mean value over and over for each Target.ID, you're actually plotting multiple copies of the mean bar, one on top of the other.)

    You can also summarize the data (i.e., calculate the mean and standard deviations) outside of ggplot and then use the summarized data frame for plotting. That's sometimes necessary in more complex situations, but you can do it all within ggplot here.

  2. It seems to me points would work better than bars here.

The code below provides both the point and bar versions and also shows how to add either the standard deviation of the data or 95% confidence interval of the mean of the data. The blue lines represent the standard deviations, while the red lines represent the 95% confidence interval.

I've provided bootstrapped confidence intervals. To provide classical normal confidence intervals, switch from mean_cl_boot to mean_cl_normal.

If you want the y-axis to go down to zero, add coord_cartesian(ylim=c(0,150)) or whatever maximum y-value you wish (as the comments discuss, to avoid a misleading graph, it should be above the top of the error bar, regardless of whether the bar represents the SD or CI).

ggplot(half1, aes(x=Target.ID, y=Maj.Allele.Freq)) +
  stat_summary(fun.data=mean_sdl, geom="errorbar", width=0.1, colour="blue") +
  stat_summary(fun.data=mean_sdl, geom="point", colour="blue", size=3) +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, colour="red", geom="errorbar", width=0.1) +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, colour="red", geom="point") +
  labs(x="", y="Average Major Allele Frequency", 
       title="Allele Balance AmpliSeq\nIdentity Sample P2") +
  theme_bw() +
  theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust = 1, vjust = .5)) 

enter image description here

ggplot(half1, aes(x=Target.ID, y=Maj.Allele.Freq)) +
  stat_summary(fun.y=mean, geom="bar", fill="yellowgreen", colour="black") +
  stat_summary(fun.data=mean_sdl, geom="errorbar", width=0.1, size=1, colour="blue") +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, colour="red", geom="errorbar", width=0.1, size=0.7) +
  labs(x="", y="Average Major Allele Frequency", 
       title="Allele Balance AmpliSeq\nIdentity Sample P2") +
  theme_bw() +
  theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust = 1, vjust = .5))   

enter image description here

You could also put both the SD and 95% CI on the same plot:

pnp = position_nudge(x=0.1)
pnm = position_nudge(x=-0.1)

ggplot(half1, aes(x=Target.ID, y=Maj.Allele.Freq)) +
  stat_summary(fun.data=mean_sdl, geom="errorbar", width=0.1, position=pnp, aes(colour="SD")) +
  stat_summary(fun.data=mean_sdl, geom="point", position=pnp, aes(colour="SD")) +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, geom="errorbar", width=0.1, 
               position=pnm, aes(colour="95% CI")) +
  stat_summary(fun.data = mean_cl_boot, geom="point", position=pnm, aes(colour="95% CI")) +
  labs(x="", y="Average Major Allele Frequency", colour="",
       title="Allele Balance AmpliSeq\nIdentity Sample P2") +
  theme_bw() +
  theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle = 90, hjust = 1, vjust = .5))

enter image description here

2
  • I always learn something new here. I didn't know I could just do the calculations from within ggplot. Thank you for the detailed answer. I can work with this and make a few tweaks as needed. The commenters are right, it doesn't make sense to cut off the SD bars but now I know how to do it anyway.
    – aminards
    Nov 7 '16 at 14:09
  • You can create a summarized data frame and then plot that (which is sometimes necessary in more complex situations, but not here), or you can do the calculations within ggplot. Either way, you don't need to add a column that repeats the mean value over and over, and in fact doing it that way results in multiple copies of each bar being plotted one on top of the other. I've updated my answer to discuss this.
    – eipi10
    Nov 7 '16 at 18:42

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