5

Suppose you want to launch a (random) process for every folder in a list in a short code:

var exec = require('child_process').exec;
var folders = [...]; // a list from somewhere

_.each(folders, function(folder) {
    exec("tar cvf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder);
});

If the list is long, i might end up running a large amount of processes concurrently, which is to be avoid. What's a fairly simple way to run the executions on a controlled rate (maximum 5 concurrent process here)?

edit: the question is meant for every kind of async flow (in which you want to control the rate), not just for the exec-over-folders problem.

6
+300

Use async package and it's function: eachLimit

it does the same as lodash but with async flow handling and making iterations to not run out of limit at a time:

var async = require('async');
var exec = require('child_process').exec;
var folders = [...]; // a list from somewhere

var maxProcesses = 5; // 5 items at a time
async.eachLimit(
  folders, // collection
  maxProcesses, // limit
  function(folder, next) { // iterator function. args: item, callback
    var cmd = "tar -cf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder;
    console.log('calling:', cmd);
    exec(cmd, function(err, stdOut, stdErr) { // executing cmd
      if(err) console.error(err); // if error putting to console
      next(); // passing the async flow to handle the next iteration
    });
  },
  function() { // after all iterations finished
    console.log('finished processing commands');
  });

or with parallelLimit :

var async = require('async');
var _ = require('lodash');
var exec = require('child_process').exec;
var folders = [...]; // a list from somewhere

var callStack = [];
_.each(folders, function(folder) { // generating our stack of commands
  callStack.push(function(done) {
    var cmd = "tar -cf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder;
    exec(cmd, function(err, stdOut, stdErr) {
      if(err) console.error(err);
      done(null, folder);
    });
  });
});

var maxProcesses = 5; // 5 items at a time
async.parallelLimit(callStack, maxProcesses, function() {console.log('finished');});

"making it look shorter" :)

const
  async = require('async'),
  exec = require('child_process').exec;

let folders = [...]; 
async.eachLimit(folders, 5, 
  (folder, next) => 
    exec("tar -cf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder, () => next()),
    () => console.log('finished'));

and

const
  async = require('async'),
  exec = require('child_process').exec;

let folders = [...]; 
let commands = folders.map(folder => done => exec("tar -cf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder, () => done());
async.parallelLimit(commands, 5, () => console.log('finished'));



if any of this examples not ok for You, or Your system is very big so let's try to use message queue system like rsmq

  • That actually saves a few steps over the equivalent which is to simply start K processes and have the exec callback function pop the parameters off an array and start the next one when a process exits. – Paul Nov 6 '16 at 18:32
  • 1
    I think grunt or gulp also probably has plugins for this use case. – Paul Nov 6 '16 at 18:36
  • 1
    Nicest answer so far, I really like how async can deal with the problem while keeping things asynchrones. – Sebastien Nov 6 '16 at 21:17
  • 1
    It's not really about the issue (every programmer with a little bit of experience can deal with that one). It's more about the pattern. I encountered this problem quite a few times now, and dealing with it with 20+ lines of codes every time, just didn't sound right to me. Wanted a more solid and canonical pattern here, that's what the bounty is for. – Sebastien Nov 7 '16 at 15:47
  • 1
    Haha, you didn't really have to. You already have the best answer so far, plus i'm basically judging readability, relevance and performances (which are all good with async). I'm just waiting a few days more before assigning the bounty, just in case someone comes up with a more elegant solution (which i doubt). – Sebastien Nov 7 '16 at 16:42
2

Promises

I just love promises and love to stick them wherever possible.

Here is a solution I believe would work for your case.

var exec = require('child_process').exec;
var folders = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"];
var maxConcurrentProcessCount = 5;
var promiseArr = [];

folders.forEach(function (folder) {
    var pr = {
        start: function () {
            if (pr.promise) return pr.promise;
            return pr.promise = new Promise(function (resolve) {
                exec("tar cvf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder,
                  undefined, (err, stdout, stderr) => {
                      // This is your logic, you can reject depending on err
                      var ind = promiseArr.indexOf(pr);
                      if (ind >= 0) promiseArr.splice(ind, 1);
                      resolve(stdout);
                  });
            });
        }
    };
    promiseArr.push(pr);
});

var racePromises = function () {
    if (!promiseArr.length) return;
    Promise.race(promiseArr.slice(0, maxConcurrentProcessCount).map(x => x.start())).then(racePromises);
    console.log("Current running process count: " + promiseArr.filter(x => x.promise).length);
}
racePromises();

Short explanation

Create an array where each element represents a task. Firstly select 5 of them and start them. Whenever one of them completes, remove it from the array and start 5 tasks from the array again.

Example Run

Test Example

Recreating eachLimit with promises just for fun

var myEachLimit = function (collection, maxConcurrentCalls, callback) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        var promiseArr = [];

        collection.forEach(function (item) {
            var pr = {
                start: function () {
                    if (pr.promise) return pr.promise;
                    return pr.promise = new Promise(function (resolve) {
                        callback.call(item, item, function () {
                            var ind = promiseArr.indexOf(pr);
                            if (ind >= 0) promiseArr.splice(ind, 1);
                            resolve();
                        });

                    });
                }
            };
            promiseArr.push(pr);
        });

        var racePromises = function () {
            if (!promiseArr.length) {
                resolve();
                return;
            }
            Promise.race(promiseArr.slice(0, maxConcurrentProcessCount).map(x => x.start())).then(racePromises);
            console.log("Current running process count: " + promiseArr.filter(x => x.promise).length);
        }
        racePromises();
    });
}


// Demo

var exec = require('child_process').exec;
var folders = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "10"];
var maxConcurrentProcessCount = 5;

myEachLimit(folders, maxConcurrentProcessCount, function (folder, next) {
    exec("tar cvf " + folder + ".tgz " + folder, (err, stdout, stderr) => {
        next();
    });
}).then(function () {
    console.log("Finished all processes");
});
  • Interesting way, but aren't you going to exceed the control number? On the second run of racePromises, you may have up to 9 processes up... I think we should change racePromises to take an optional nbProcess argument here. – Sebastien Nov 7 '16 at 5:40
  • @Sebastien It will still run 5 processes. The process is removed from the array only when it is completed. So in the second run of racePromises, when you fetch 5 processes from the array, 4 of them is from the previous run. – Gökhan Kurt Nov 7 '16 at 5:42
  • Promises are nice, but @GökhanKurt let's be honest, Your code has too much additional operations like checking the array, map-ing, too deep nesting (joxi.ru/eAO55BF41Kbemo) - makes JS code look ugly. I understand that Promise is shipped with latest nodejs, and it can be faster that additional async package. But ovearall ~100ms speed difference does not make much effort. – num8er Nov 7 '16 at 15:15
  • 1
    @num8er Yeah, promises are not dedicated for this job, are hard to understand, etc. But this is just one way to do it with promises. You could very well write a code snippet/function that you would document once and use for all cases. In fact, a function just like eachLimit on async library can be written with promises. – Gökhan Kurt Nov 7 '16 at 16:30
  • 1
    I'm impressed. Upvoted for the effort! I would still rely on a lib to simplify the task, but that code is helping me understand promises better. Definitely not a waste. – Sebastien Nov 7 '16 at 16:52
1

Native Javascript

All you need is some kind of a loadbalancer. Put your loop into a seperate function like so:

  /**
  * Loops through your Folderarray and begins at the given index.
  * @param  {[type]} lastIndex       [last index which your loop stopped.]
  * @param  {[type]} maxProcesses    [maximum of processes you want to have.]
  * @param  {[type]} folderArray     [folder array.]
  */
  function loopFolders(maxProcesses, lastIndex, folderArray){

    // counter for our actual processes.
    let processes = 0;
    // This is to stop the loop, since JavaScript has no built-in break for loops.
    let maximumReached = false;

    // loop through array.
    folderArray.forEach(function(element, index, array){

      // Do stuff once you hit the last point.
      if(index > lastIndex && !maximumReached){

        // Check how many processes are running.
        if(processes <= maxProcesses){

          // create your child process.
          let exec = require('child_process').exec;
          // Do stuff with Folderelement from Folderarray.
          exec("tar cvf " + element + ".tgz " + element);

          // Increment processes.
          processes++;

        }else{
          /**
           * Magic begins here:
           * If max processes was reached, retry after a while.
           */

          // We are done for this loop.
           maximumReached = true;

           // Set timeout for 10 seconds and then retry.
          setTimeout(function(){
            // Calll function again.
            loopFolders(maxProcesses, index, array);
          }, 10000);
        }

      }

    });

  }

To call this loop from the beginning you just go like this:

// your Array of folders from somewhere.    
let folders = [...];
// Call loopFolders with maximum of 5 and the beginning index of 0.
loopFolders(5, 0, folders);

This code is a very basic example of a loadbalancer. Keep in mind that my example will never know if any of the other processes are done. You could use some kind of a callback to be sure. But this should do the trick for you at least to begin with something.

To make use of the NodeJS Childprocess events please take a look at https://nodejs.org/api/child_process.html

You could do a callback for the loop in the 'exit' event to make sure that your child processes won't go out of control.

Hope this helps.

Regards, Megajin

  • how You control the finish of execution? What if tar will work longer and after 10 seconds it will start another portion of loop without finishing previous ones? - it will make a huge list of archivation commands in background and also exec() will be out of control too. – num8er Nov 6 '16 at 20:13
  • 1
    @num8er That's why I said it is a very basic example. There is some need of a callback from that exec child process for sure. The callback could be in one of the child process events like 'exit'. The previous loop will run empty because there is no native JavaScript break for loops. With the index I defined you can start again at the given point. – Megajin Nov 6 '16 at 20:34
  • Yes, about basicness I agree with You. – num8er Nov 6 '16 at 20:36

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