37

I seem to remember there is a package that printed the versions and relevant information about Python packages used in a Jupyter notebook so the results in it were reproducible. But I cannot remember the name of the package. Can any of you point me in the right direction?

Thanks in advance!

4
  • 2
    pip freeze shows information about each package. Or you can use conda list.
    – estebanpdl
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 17:51
  • 1
    Does pip freeze print the information about the packages inside the notebook?
    – msx
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 17:54
  • Those examples show the information in terminal or command prompt.
    – estebanpdl
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 17:57
  • 1
    @msx you can use magic command, !pip freeze
    – user75252
    Commented Mar 10, 2021 at 5:27

9 Answers 9

36

I've cobbled this answer by combining the two solutions already provided. I ultimately wanted to generate a requirements.txt type file, for easy use with the awesome Binder website. Obviously, I don't want to pip freeze my whole system but I also don't want to create separate virtual environments for every notebook (which is ultimately where my problem stems from).

This outputs a nicely formatted requirements.txt type string and handles some of the intricacies involved when you use import from rather than just import.

Get locally imported modules from current notebook

import pkg_resources
import types
def get_imports():
    for name, val in globals().items():
        if isinstance(val, types.ModuleType):
            # Split ensures you get root package, 
            # not just imported function
            name = val.__name__.split(".")[0]

        elif isinstance(val, type):
            name = val.__module__.split(".")[0]
            
        # Some packages are weird and have different
        # imported names vs. system/pip names. Unfortunately,
        # there is no systematic way to get pip names from
        # a package's imported name. You'll have to add
        # exceptions to this list manually!
        poorly_named_packages = {
            "PIL": "Pillow",
            "sklearn": "scikit-learn"
        }
        if name in poorly_named_packages.keys():
            name = poorly_named_packages[name]
            
        yield name
imports = list(set(get_imports()))

# The only way I found to get the version of the root package
# from only the name of the package is to cross-check the names 
# of installed packages vs. imported packages
requirements = []
for m in pkg_resources.working_set:
    if m.project_name in imports and m.project_name!="pip":
        requirements.append((m.project_name, m.version))

for r in requirements:
    print("{}=={}".format(*r))

Sample output:

scipy==0.19.0
requests==2.18.1
Pillow==5.0.0
numpy==1.13.0
matplotlib==2.0.2

EDITED 2018-04-21: pip version 10 stopped supporting the .get_installed_distributions() method. Using pkg_resources.working_set instead.

1
  • 3
    This answer is nice because it determines the version of a package even if you import only a subpackage (e.g., the version of scipy if you import scipy.integrate). Thanks!
    – millikan
    Commented Oct 30, 2018 at 15:15
31

This gets all the installed packages

import pip #needed to use the pip functions
for i in pip.get_installed_distributions(local_only=True):
    print(i)

To get the list of packages from current notebook

import types
def imports():
    for name, val in globals().items():
        if isinstance(val, types.ModuleType):
            yield val.__name__
list(imports())
6
  • 2
    Thanks for your reply, but I am looking for a package that only lists the packages used in the notebook in question.
    – msx
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 18:09
  • possible duplicate of this question Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 18:27
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/4858100/… Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 18:28
  • +1 for the answer using globals and types.ModuleType as it answer the OP question and it is more reliable than other solutions from the aforementioned post (some of theses answers using sys.modules will skip modules imported like import numpy as np).
    – mgc
    Commented Nov 4, 2016 at 19:26
  • 9
    I get an error running the first code block: AttributeError: module 'pip' has no attribute 'get_installed_distributions' pip.__version__ == '19.2.3'
    – Bill
    Commented Nov 27, 2019 at 5:25
30

UPDATED:

As David Leal mentioned in comments old one-liner approach works only for direct imports. So as requested by OP I came up with simple pip package to do the heavy lifting:

!pip install print-versions # works for python >= 3.8
from print_versions import print_versions

import numpy as np
from pandas import DataFrame

print_versions(globals())

# numpy==1.25.2
# pandas==1.5.3

Next step will be to handle imports like PIL and sklearn as their package names differ from what is used in imports.

OLD:

One-liner:

# In[1]:
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import tensorflow as tf

print('\n'.join(f'{m.__name__}=={m.__version__}' for m in globals().values() if getattr(m, '__version__', None)))

Output:

pandas==1.1.1
numpy==1.19.1
tensorflow==2.2.0
3
  • 2
    add a == to the print function to make it similar to the requirements format Commented May 5, 2021 at 11:06
  • one liner should not exists in my opinion. I know it is a cool trend, but, in my opinion it is one of the most unreadable thing a programmer can do to another programmer :D Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 17:47
  • 1
    It works, but only for import statements, it doesn't consider the imports using from X import Y. I tested in the Colab notebook.
    – David Leal
    Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 19:04
5

I made some improvements to @Alex P. Miller's answer so that (sorry I don't have enough reps to "comment" directly on his answer)

  1. Automatically works with module names where case sensitivity was causing problems
  2. Also lists modules without version numbers as "unknown" to make it clear it couldn't find a match.
  3. also lists built in modules if it can detect it.
# show versions of packages
# adopted from https://stackoverflow.com/questions/40428931/package-for-listing-version-of-packages-used-in-a-jupyter-notebook

    def get_imports():
        for name, val in globals().items():
            if isinstance(val, types.ModuleType):
                # Split ensures you get root package, 
                # not just imported function
                name = val.__name__.split(".")[0]
            elif isinstance(val, type):
                name = val.__module__.split(".")[0]
            # Some packages are weird and have different
            # imported names vs. system/pip names. Unfortunately,
            # there is no systematic way to get pip names from
            # a package's imported name. You'll have to add
            # exceptions to this list manually!
            poorly_named_packages = {
                "sklearn": "scikit-learn"
            }
            if name in poorly_named_packages.keys():
                name = poorly_named_packages[name]
            yield name.lower()
    imports = list(set(get_imports()))

    # The only way I found to get the version of the root package
    # from only the name of the package is to cross-check the names 
    # of installed packages vs. imported packages
    modules = []
    for m in sys.builtin_module_names:
        if m.lower() in imports and m !='builtins':
            modules.append((m,'Python BuiltIn'))
            imports.remove(m.lower())

    for m in pkg_resources.working_set:
        if m.project_name.lower() in imports and m.project_name!="pip":
            modules.append((m.project_name, m.version))
            imports.remove(m.project_name.lower())

    for m in sys.modules:
        if m.lower() in imports and m !='builtins':
            modules.append((m,'unknown'))

    # print('System=='+platform.system()+' '+platform.release()+'; Version=='+platform.version())
    for r in modules:
        print("{}=={}".format(*r))
3

Adapted from gafortiby's answer: a shorter version to list only explicit list of packages. I found this suitable to memorize versions of the most important packages used in a jupyter notebook (for other readers or future use):

import pkg_resources
# list packages to be checked
root_packages = [
    'geoviews', 'geopandas', 'pandas', 'numpy', 
    'matplotlib', 'shapely', 'cartopy', 'holoviews',
    'mapclassify', 'fiona', 'bokeh']
# print versions, but check if package is imported first
for m in pkg_resources.working_set:
    if m.project_name.lower() in root_packages:
        print(f"{m.project_name}=={m.version}")

Output:

Shapely==1.7.0
pandas==1.0.1
numpy==1.18.1
matplotlib==3.1.3
mapclassify==2.2.0
holoviews==1.12.7
geoviews==1.6.6
geopandas==0.6.3
Fiona==1.8.13
Cartopy==0.17.0
bokeh==1.4.0

Enhanced version with nicer display:

import pkg_resources
from IPython.display import display
import pandas as pd

root_packages = [
    'geoviews', 'geopandas', 'pandas', 'numpy', 'cloudpickle',
    'matplotlib', 'shapely', 'cartopy', 'holoviews',
    'mapclassify', 'fiona', 'bokeh', 'pyproj', 'ipython',
    'jupyterlab']
root_packages.sort(reverse=True)
root_packages_list = []

for m in pkg_resources.working_set:
    if m.project_name.lower() in root_packages:
        root_packages_list.append([m.project_name, m.version])

display(pd.DataFrame(
            root_packages_list,
            columns=["package", "version"]
        ).set_index("package").transpose())

Output: Example output package versions

2

Another solution (based on Vivek's answer):

import types

def imports():
    for name, val in globals().items():
        if isinstance(val, types.ModuleType):
            yield val.__name__

excludes = ['builtins', 'types', 'sys']

imported_modules = [module for module in imports() if module not in excludes]

clean_modules = []

for module in imported_modules:

    sep = '.'  # to handle 'matplotlib.pyplot' cases
    rest = module.split(sep, 1)[0]
    clean_modules.append(rest)

changed_imported_modules = list(set(clean_modules))  # drop duplicates

pip_modules = !pip freeze  # you could also use `!conda list` with anaconda

for module in pip_modules:
    name, version = module.split('==')
    if name in changed_imported_modules:
        print(name + '\t' + version)

Sample output:

astropy 3.2.1
matplotlib  3.1.0
numpy   1.16.4
pandas  0.25.0
1

I had some problems just doing writing in an empty cell pip list But once I ran it in a whole new file, I had no problems at all, and got all the libraries installed in the notebook!

0

I think the pip based approaches are superior in terms of functionality, but it may be possible the OP was trying to recall the name of the version_information extension for Jupyter: https://pypi.org/project/version_information/

1
0

Since these answers are a bit dated, the simpler solutions didn't work for me and it took some stumbling to find an easy, working solution elsewhere online:

from sinfo import sinfo
sinfo()

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