13

Does the compiler generate the same code for iter().map().sum() and iter().fold()? In the end they achieve the same goal, but the first code would iterate two times, once for the map and once for the sum.

Here is an example. Which version would be faster in total?

pub fn square(s: u32) -> u64 {
    match s {
        s @ 1...64 => 2u64.pow(s - 1),
        _ => panic!("Square must be between 1 and 64")
    }
}

pub fn total() -> u64 {
    // A fold
    (0..64).fold(0u64, |r, s| r + square(s + 1))
    // or a map
    (1..64).map(square).sum()
}

What would be good tools to look at the assembly or benchmark this?

3
  • 2
    Wait, what do you mean by iterate two times? Nov 5, 2016 at 18:05
  • 1
    @MatthieuM. a common misconception. Languages like Ruby, for example, will produce an entire Array as the result of a map. Each chained map call thus has to iterate over a new container. There are also "lazy" iterators in Ruby, but they aren't as common.
    – Shepmaster
    Nov 5, 2016 at 18:13
  • 1
    @Shepmaster: That's what I am fearing, yes. Nov 5, 2016 at 18:15

2 Answers 2

26

For them to generate the same code, they'd first have to do the same thing. Your two examples do not:

fn total_fold() -> u64 {
    (0..64).fold(0u64, |r, s| r + square(s + 1))
}

fn total_map() -> u64 {
    (1..64).map(square).sum()
}

fn main() {
    println!("{}", total_fold());
    println!("{}", total_map());
}
18446744073709551615
9223372036854775807

Let's assume you meant

fn total_fold() -> u64 {
    (1..64).fold(0u64, |r, s| r + square(s + 1))
}

fn total_map() -> u64 {
    (1..64).map(|i| square(i + 1)).sum()
}

There are a few avenues to check:

  1. The generated LLVM IR
  2. The generated assembly
  3. Benchmark

The easiest source for the IR and assembly is one of the playgrounds (official or alternate). These both have buttons to view the assembly or IR. You can also pass --emit=llvm-ir or --emit=asm to the compiler to generate these files.

Make sure to generate assembly or IR in release mode. The attribute #[inline(never)] is often useful to keep functions separate to find them easier in the output.

Benchmarking is documented in The Rust Programming Language, so there's no need to repeat all that valuable information.


Before Rust 1.14, these do not produce the exact same assembly. I'd wait for benchmarking / profiling data to see if there's any meaningful impact on performance before I worried.

As of Rust 1.14, they do produce the same assembly! This is one reason I love Rust. You can write clear and idiomatic code and smart people come along and make it equally as fast.

but the first code would iterate two times, once for the map and once for the sum.

This is incorrect, and I'd love to know what source told you this so we can go correct it at that point and prevent future misunderstandings. An iterator operates on a pull basis; one element is processed at a time. The core method is next, which yields a single value, running just enough computation to produce that value.

6

First, let's fix those example to actually return the same result:

pub fn total_fold_iter() -> u64 {
    (1..65).fold(0u64, |r, s| r + square(s))
}

pub fn total_map_iter() -> u64 {
    (1..65).map(square).sum()
}

Now, let's develop them, starting with fold. A fold is just a loop and an accumulator, it is roughly equivalent to:

pub fn total_fold_explicit() -> u64 {
    let mut total = 0;
    for i in 1..65 {
        total = total + square(i);
    }
    total
}

Then, let's go with map and sum, and unwrap the sum first, which is roughly equivalent to:

pub fn total_map_partial_iter() -> u64 {
    let mut total = 0;
    for i in (1..65).map(square) {
        total += i;
    }
    total
}

It's just a simple accumulator! And now, let's unwrap the map layer (which only applies a function), obtaining something that is roughly equivalent to:

pub fn total_map_explicit() -> u64 {
    let mut total = 0;
    for i in 1..65 {
        let s = square(i);
        total += s;
    }
    total
}

As you can see, the both of them are extremely similar: they have apply the same operations in the same order and have the same overall complexity.


Which is faster? I have no idea. And a micro-benchmark may only tell half the truth anyway: just because something is faster in a micro-benchmark does not mean it is faster in the midst of other code.

What I can say, however, is that they both have equivalent complexity and therefore should behave similarly, ie within a factor of each other.

And that I would personally go for map + sum, because it expresses the intent more clearly whereas fold is the "kitchen-sink" of Iterator methods and therefore far less informative.

11
  • 1
    The transformation that you apply to get the "plain" for loops is not how the compiler works. Perhaps after many optimizations it winds up with something similar (in fact I have little doubt that the two iterator chains wind up with the equivalent machine code), but that it not how the compiler desugars the two iterator chains. By contrast, the loops that you do end up with are so obviously equivalent that they should generate literally the same code — the differences are entirely cosmetic even to the compiler.
    – user395760
    Nov 5, 2016 at 20:55
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    I don't think it has any impact on this scenario (who knows) but .map() just learned to pass on the fold, so it's now doing part of that rewriting explicitly, see github.com/rust-lang/rust/pull/37315
    – bluss
    Nov 6, 2016 at 1:54
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    @delnan Minus some extremely minor nitpicks, it seems almost exactly like what the compiler sees after inlining. At what point do you disagree?
    – Veedrac
    Nov 6, 2016 at 5:34
  • 1
    @delnan For the second the compiler inlines Sum::sum, which is just a fold, so that fold and its function argument then get inlined. Ignoring where the argument is evaluated, that's the first step given. The hardest to visualise step is inlining the map call because you inline twice inside the for loop, and fold some branches on constants. These are basic optimizations for LLVM, though.
    – Veedrac
    Nov 6, 2016 at 14:32
  • 2
    Good, and the prize in crosshairs is worth even more than this example, see the VecDeque improvement or corresponding ndarray ones for .fold(). Segmented/nested iteration is seldom as optimizable when Iterator::next becomes a state machine; in the fold method we have the opportunity to write plain nested loops instead.
    – bluss
    Nov 6, 2016 at 15:02

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