12

I'm using Sequelize as ORM with a PostgreSQL engine. When using raw queries I can create a table and have columns with 'CHECK' constraints such as

CREATE TABLE products (
    product_no integer,
    name text,
    price numeric CHECK (price > 0)
);

In the docs I cannot find a way to do this in Sequelize when defining models. Is there any way of doing this? I don't want to reinvent the wheel ;)

Thanks!!

2 Answers 2

9
module.exports = {

    up: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {

        return queryInterface.createTable('Products', {
            product_no: {
                type: Sequelize.INTEGER
            },
            price: {
                type: Sequelize.NUMERIC
            },
            name: {
                type: Sequelize.TEXT
            }
        }).

        then(() => queryInterface.addConstraint('Products', {
            type: 'check',
            fields: ['price'],  // 2024-05-03: This might be needed in the later versions.
            where: {
                price: {
                    [Sequelize.Op.gt]: 0
                }
            }
        }));
    },

    down: (queryInterface, Sequelize) => {
        return queryInterface.dropTable('Products');
    }
};
1
  • 4
    Is it possible to declare check constraints in model definition? Commented Aug 29, 2019 at 13:30
-6

Take a look at the Validations section.

var Product = sequelize.define('product', {
  price: {
    validate: {
      min: 0  // Only allow values >= 0
    }
  }
});

You can also set custom validation rules:

var Product = sequelize.define('product', {
  price: {
    validate: {
      isPositive: function (value) {
        return value > 0;  // Don't allow 0.
      }
    }
  }
});
3
  • 4
    I believe this only enforces the value at application layer. I don't think this actually puts a constraint on the table. If you're using sequelize migrations, you can run a raw query to insert the constraint yourself.
    – thgaskell
    Commented Nov 6, 2016 at 0:46
  • Agree with the comment above. I was looking into a way to match force-sync and migrations (force-sync is used in circle-ci testing). The solution in the end was to use migrations instead of force-sync in circle-ci, a bit slower but works just as good. Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 2:51
  • 1
    App side validations != Database constraints
    – Yehonatan
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 11:51

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