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I am using cython to compute a pairwise distance matrix using a custom metric as a faster alternative to scipy.spatial.distance.pdist.

My Motivation

My metric has the form

def mymetric(u,v,w):
     np.sum(w * (1 - np.abs(np.abs(u - v) / np.pi - 1))**2)

and the pairwise distance using scipy can be computed as

x = sp.spatial.distance.pdist(r, metric=lambda u, v: mymetric(u, v, w))

Here, r is a m-by-n matrix of m vectors with dimension of n and w is a "weight" factor with dimmension n.

Since in my problem m is rather high, the computation is really slow. For m = 2000 and n = 10 this takes approx 20 sec.

Initial solution with Cython

I implemented a simple function in cython that computes the pairwise distance and immediately got very promising results -- speedup of over 500x.

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np
import cython

from libc.math cimport fabs, M_PI

@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int i, j, k, c, size
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] ans
    size = r.shape[0] * (r.shape[0] - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)
    c = -1
    for i in range(r.shape[0]):
        for j in range(i + 1, r.shape[0]):
            c += 1
            for k in range(r.shape[1]):
                ans[c] += w[k] * (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))**2.0

    return ans

Problems using OpenMP

I wanted to speed up the computation some more using OpenMP, however, the following solution is roughly 3 times slower than the serial version.

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

import cython
from cython.parallel import prange, parallel

cimport openmp

from libc.math cimport fabs, M_PI

@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance_omp(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int i, j, k, c, size, m, n
    cdef np.double_t a
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] ans
    m = r.shape[0]
    n = r.shape[1]
    size = m * (m - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)
    with nogil, parallel(num_threads=8):
        for i in prange(m, schedule='dynamic'):
            for j in range(i + 1, m):
                c = i * (m - 1) - i * (i + 1) / 2 + j - 1
                for k in range(n):
                    ans[c] += w[k] * (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))**2.0

    return ans

I don't know why is it actually slower, but I tried to introduce the following changes. This resulted not only in even slightly worse performance but also, the resulting distance ans is computed correctly only in the beginning of the array, the rest is just zeros. The speedup achieved through this is negligible.

import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

import cython
from cython.parallel import prange, parallel

cimport openmp

from libc.math cimport fabs, M_PI
from libc.stdlib cimport malloc, free

@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance_omp_2(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int k, l, c, m, n
    cdef Py_ssize_t i, j, d
    cdef size_t size
    cdef int *ci, *cj

    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1, mode="c"] ans

    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2, mode="c"] data
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1, mode="c"] weight

    data = np.ascontiguousarray(r, dtype=np.float64)
    weight = np.ascontiguousarray(w, dtype=np.float64)

    m = r.shape[0]
    n = r.shape[1]
    size = m * (m - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)

    cj = <int*> malloc(size * sizeof(int))
    ci = <int*> malloc(size * sizeof(int))

    c = -1
    for i in range(m):
        for j in range(i + 1, m):
            c += 1
            ci[c] = i
            cj[c] = j

    with nogil, parallel(num_threads=8):
        for d in prange(size, schedule='guided'):
            for k in range(n):
                ans[d] += weight[k] * (1.0 - fabs(fabs(data[ci[d], k] - data[cj[d], k]) / M_PI - 1.0))**2.0

    return ans

For all functions, I am using the following .pyxbld file

def make_ext(modname, pyxfilename):
    from distutils.extension import Extension
    return Extension(name=modname,
                     sources=[pyxfilename],
                     extra_compile_args=['-O3', '-march=native', '-ffast-math', '-fopenmp'],
                     extra_link_args=['-fopenmp'],
                     )

Summary

I have zero experience with cython and know only basics of C. I would appreciate any suggestion of what may be the cause of this unexpected behavior, or even, how to rephrase my question better.


Best serial solution (10 % faster than original serial)

@cython.cdivision(True)
@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance_2(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int i, j, k, c, size
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] ans
    cdef np.double_t accumulator, tmp
    size = r.shape[0] * (r.shape[0] - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)
    c = -1
    for i in range(r.shape[0]):
        for j in range(i + 1, r.shape[0]):
            c += 1
            accumulator = 0
            for k in range(r.shape[1]):
                tmp = (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))
                accumulator += w[k] * (tmp*tmp)
            ans[c] = accumulator

    return ans

Best parallel solution (1 % faster then original parallel, 6 times faster then best serial using 8 threads)

@cython.cdivision(True)
@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance_omp_2d(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int i, j, k, c, size, m, n
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] ans
    cdef np.double_t accumulator, tmp
    m = r.shape[0]
    n = r.shape[1]
    size = m * (m - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)
    with nogil, parallel(num_threads=8):
        for i in prange(m, schedule='dynamic'):
            for j in range(i + 1, m):
                c = i * (m - 1) - i * (i + 1) / 2 + j - 1
                accumulator = 0
                for k in range(n):
                    tmp = (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))
                    ans[c] += w[k] * (tmp*tmp)

    return ans

Unsolved issues:

When I try to apply the accumulator solution proposed in the answer, I get the following error:

Error compiling Cython file:
------------------------------------------------------------
...
                c = i * (m - 1) - i * (i + 1) / 2 + j - 1
                accumulator = 0
                for k in range(n):
                    tmp = (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))
                    accumulator += w[k] * (tmp*tmp)
                ans[c] = accumulator
                                   ^
------------------------------------------------------------
pdist.pyx:207:36: Cannot read reduction variable in loop body

Full code:

@cython.cdivision(True)
@cython.wraparound(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
def pairwise_distance_omp(np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=2] r, np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] w):
    cdef int i, j, k, c, size, m, n
    cdef np.ndarray[np.double_t, ndim=1] ans
    cdef np.double_t accumulator, tmp
    m = r.shape[0]
    n = r.shape[1]
    size = m * (m - 1) / 2
    ans = np.zeros(size, dtype=r.dtype)
    with nogil, parallel(num_threads=8):
        for i in prange(m, schedule='dynamic'):
            for j in range(i + 1, m):
                c = i * (m - 1) - i * (i + 1) / 2 + j - 1
                accumulator = 0
                for k in range(n):
                    tmp = (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))
                    accumulator += w[k] * (tmp*tmp)
                ans[c] = accumulator

    return ans
  • Update: found a mistake in my code, the current problem is only the performance of the parallel code. – Ondrian Nov 6 '16 at 18:53
  • Ondrian - I am getting the same "Cannot read reduction variable in loop body" error when I try to do a simple sum over matrix columns using an accumulator - what was your bug that caused this error? – aph Jan 2 '17 at 20:50
  • 1
    @aph The problem was, if I remember correctly, using the accumulator += something syntax instead of the accumulator = accumulator + something. – Ondrian Jan 5 '17 at 14:20
  • Thanks @Ondrian - that was exactly my problem! – aph Jan 5 '17 at 16:09
3

I haven't timed this myself so it's possible this might not help too much, however:

If you run cython -a to get an annotated version of your initial attempt (pairwise_distance_omp) you'll find the ans[c] += ... line is yellow, suggesting it's got Python overhead. A look at that the C corresponding to that line suggests that it's checking for divide by zero. One key part of it starts:

if (unlikely(M_PI == 0)) {

You know this will never be true (and in any case you'd probably live with NaN values rather than an exception if it was). You can avoid this check by adding the following extra decorator to the function:

@cython.cdivision(True)
# other decorators
def pairwise_distance_omp # etc...

This cuts out quite a bit of C code, including bits that have to be run in a single thread. The flip-side is that most of that code should never be run, and the compiler should probably be able to work that out, so it isn't clear how much difference that will make.


Second suggestion:

# at the top
cdef np.double_t accumulator, tmp

    # further down later in the loop:
    c = i * (m - 1) - i * (i + 1) / 2 + j - 1
    accumulator = 0
    for k in range(r.shape[1]):
        tmp = (1.0 - fabs(fabs(r[i, k] - r[j, k]) / M_PI - 1.0))
        accumulator = accumulator + w[k] * (tmp*tmp)
    ans[c] = accumulator

This has two advantages hopefully: 1) tmp*tmp should probably be quicker than floating point exponent to the power of 2. 2) You avoid reading from the ans array, which might be a bit slow because the compiler always has to be careful that some other thread hasn't changed it (even though you know it shouldn't have).

| improve this answer | |
  • This certainly helps, thank you, however, the problem still stands. Both OpenMP versions are now roughly 2 times slower than the serial version (using 8 threads in 8 physical cores). Also, I still don't know, why the second attempt computes only part of the result. – Ondrian Nov 6 '16 at 18:07
  • @Ondrian I've added a second suggestion which I think might help (although one of the improvements could also be applied to the non-parallel version). I haven't looked at the second attempt really. – DavidW Nov 6 '16 at 19:09
  • The second suggestion speeds up the serial code by 10 %, which is really good. I managed to apply the tmp*tmp part in the parallel code too, however, still getting an error for the accumulator part. By the way, the weird initial timings (serial code being faster than parallel) were actually the result of my measurement! Apparently time.process_time() is not a good way how to do it. Embarrassed about that. :) I am accepting the answer now, but if you know how to deal with the last error, I would appreciate that. I might create a new question if you don't. – Ondrian Nov 6 '16 at 20:38
  • 1
    accumulator = accumulator + w[k] * (tmp*tmp) works for me. It was getting confused and thought it was being used as an OpenMP reduction (e.g. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/88b1k8y5.aspx) but writing it in a different way helps. I should have tested it before posting it really... – DavidW Nov 6 '16 at 21:01
  • This works! Roughly 6.5 times faster than the equivalent serial for 8 threads. Thanks a lot! :) – Ondrian Nov 6 '16 at 21:14

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