5

I'm going through a React tutorial. Here's the code that doesn't work when I add a property to a Greeter object

let Greeter=React.createClass({
    render: ()=>{
      let name=this.props.name;
      return (<div>
      <h1>Hello {name}!</h1>
    </div>);
  }
});



ReactDOM.render(
  <Greeter name ="Your name"/>,
  document.getElementById("app")
);

The doesn't render at all, when I'm using Firefox, here's what I get:

unreachable code after return statementbrowser.min.js:37:6409 TypeError: undefined has no properties

0

2 Answers 2

7

The reason why this does not work is because you use an arrow function, inside an ES5 component. this is then undefined due to the arrow function, per the MDN documentation for arrow functions:

An arrow function expression has a shorter syntax compared to function expressions and does not bind its own this, arguments, super, or new.target. (emphasis mine)

React does something called 'autobinding' which automatically binds this for your functions in a component to refer to the component. But because you are using an arrow function, binding does not work (due to the fact, as mentioned earlier, arrow functions do not bind this). That means this is not bound thus it is undefined in your render function. This causes the error as undefined does not have any properties.

The solution is to use a regular function instead of an arrow function with React's autobinding:

render: function() {
    //...
}

React autobind's this so that it refers to the component in functions so it will work fine. If you are using ES6, you can use an ES6 method like so:

render() {
    //...
}

This is just syntactical sugar in ES6 for a regular function, and binding will occur. Thus, this will refer to the component, not undefined and will have receive props correctly.

4
  • I didn't downvote, but React does not auto bind handlers. You have to bind them yourself. See stackoverflow.com/questions/40445631/… Angular2 does autobind them In any case, it's also hard to tell what you are saying. A much clearer way to explain it is that this in that arrow function is the same as if you did console.log(this) just before defining the class (undefined in strict mode, window in regular mode) Changing it to a regular function means it will use the call time this Nov 9, 2016 at 22:43
  • @JuanMendes What you're looking at is an ES6 class, which does not autobind. On the contrary, ES5 and createClass does autobind. See here and the section regarding autobinding.
    – Andrew Li
    Nov 9, 2016 at 22:45
  • We may not be on the same page as to what autobind means. I will add another answer just because I think your answer makes it sound more complicated than it is. Nov 9, 2016 at 22:48
  • @JuanMendes Sure, I would love to hear what you think!
    – Andrew Li
    Nov 9, 2016 at 22:49
0

It's because you are using a fat arrow function. A fat arrow function, unlike a regular function does not have its this bound by the way it's called. It's set to what this was in the immediate outer context.

For example, your code could be rewritten as follows and it would do the same thing (that's what transpilers do).

// _this will be window in regular mode and undefined in strict mode
let _this = this;
let Greeter = React.createClass({
    render: function() {
      let name = _this.props.name;
      return (
         <div>
            <h1>Hello {name}!</h1>
         </div>
      );
  }
});



ReactDOM.render(
  <Greeter name ="Your name"/>,
  document.getElementById("app")
);

Fix it by using a regular function, because React will call component.render(), setting this to be component within the render function

7
  • Because that is the immediate surrounding scope, that's what this points to within that fat arrow function. In the OP's case, it's window and window.props is undefined. If the OP sets window.props = {name: 'yo'}, you'll see what happens Nov 9, 2016 at 22:56
  • yeah, I misread your post. The problem is that ES5 components have this bound by default (autobinding), so this inside render is still the component.
    – Andrew Li
    Nov 9, 2016 at 22:58
  • I don't know what you mean by "ES5 components have this bound by default" It will work in ES5 and ES6 if you change it to a regular function, they would behave the same way and as you explained, it's just syntactic sugar. Can you point me to some doc that talks about this being different in ES5/6? Nov 9, 2016 at 22:59
  • See here: React.createClass has a built-in magic feature that bound all methods to this automatically for you
    – Andrew Li
    Nov 9, 2016 at 23:01
  • Ahh, I see, in ES6, you could use render = () => {} If they did that, then that syntactic sugar would unsugar into : function Greeter() { this. render = ()=>{...} } , and the surrounding scope would be the constructor function with the correct this. Note the difference in the syntax, it's an equals sign, not a colon Nov 9, 2016 at 23:05

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