58

As a test I'm converting a proof-of-concept app we've written from Web Forms to Razor, simply so we can evaluate it.

I've run into one problem so far that's making my head hurt..generating client-side Javascript...

Web-Forms

<script type="text/javascript">
    var jqGridIdList = "<%: Url.Action ("getidlist", "office", new { area = "reports" }) %>";

    var availableIds = [];
    <% for (var i = 0; i < Model.Data.Count (); i++) { %>
    availableIds.push({ value : "<%: Model.Data.ElementAt (i).Text %>", label : "<%: Model.Data.ElementAt (i).Text %>" });
    <% } %>
</script>

Razor Syntax

<script type="text/javascript">
    var jqGridIdList = "@Url.Action("getidlist", "office", new { area = "reports" })";

    var availableIds = [];
    @for(var i = 0; i < Model.Data.Count (); i++) {
    availableIds.push({ value : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text", label : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text" });
    }
</script>

The compiler gives me the following error on the 'availableIds.push' line:

Compiler Error Message: CS1525: Invalid expression term '{'

It's obviously trying to compile it as C#...but how do I stop it?

Thanks,
Kieron

1 Answer 1

106

You need to wrap it in the pseudo element <text>. This will switch the parser back to html mode and it will then parse the javascript as part of the html and not c#. The reason it happens is the @for() is a c# block and anything treated within is also considered c# until it's escaped by an html tag. Since you probably don't want an html tag razor provides the <text> tag to switch modes.

If you notice the difference in your asp.net webforms you end the <% for line with a %> which takes it out of c# mode. If you download the razor highlighter extension for visual studio 2010 it will help you see when code is treated as code and html is treated as html.

<script type="text/javascript">
    var jqGridIdList = "@Url.Action("getidlist", "office", new { area = "reports" })";

    var availableIds = [];
    @for(var i = 0; i < Model.Data.Count (); i++) {
        <text>availableIds.push({ value : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text", label : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text" });</text>
    }
</script>

Update for latest version

You can now use the @: syntax for even more readability

<script type="text/javascript">
    var jqGridIdList = "@Url.Action("getidlist", "office", new { area = "reports" })";

    var availableIds = [];
    @for(var i = 0; i < Model.Data.Count (); i++) {
        @:availableIds.push({ value : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text", label : "@Model.Data.ElementAt(i).Text" });
    }
</script>
5
  • Excellent, thanks - I'll try that when I'm back in the office. Where are those extensions...are they in the gallery?
    – Kieron
    Commented Oct 28, 2010 at 22:39
  • 1
    Yeah, just search for "Razor" on the visual studio gallery or you can go visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/… Commented Oct 28, 2010 at 22:58
  • 1
    if it's just a single line of content that needs to be parsed you can use Razor's '@:' prefix e.g. @:availableIds.push(...) Commented Sep 28, 2011 at 9:21
  • Can you please tell the basic advantages of wrapping the code in <text> ? In case of Js/Html/server code.
    – Chamaququm
    Commented Jul 5, 2013 at 4:57
  • <text> only tells the razor parser that this should be output to the browser. Otherwise the parser would assume it's code. because it isn't an html element. Commented Jul 7, 2013 at 6:19

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