187

I'm beginning to think this isn't possible, but I want to ask anyway.

I want to test that one of my ES6 modules calls another ES6 module in a particular way. With Jasmine this is super easy --

The app code:

// myModule.js
import dependency from './dependency';

export default (x) => {
  dependency.doSomething(x * 2);
}

And the test code:

//myModule-test.js
import myModule from '../myModule';
import dependency from '../dependency';

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    spyOn(dependency, 'doSomething');

    myModule(2);

    expect(dependency.doSomething).toHaveBeenCalledWith(4);
  });
});

What's the equivalent with Jest? I feel like this is such a simple thing to want to do, but I've been tearing my hair out trying to figure it out.

The closest I've come is by replacing the imports with requires, and moving them inside the tests/functions. Neither of which are things I want to do.

// myModule.js
export default (x) => {
  const dependency = require('./dependency'); // yuck
  dependency.doSomething(x * 2);
}

//myModule-test.js
describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    jest.mock('../dependency');

    myModule(2);

    const dependency = require('../dependency'); // also yuck
    expect(dependency.doSomething).toBeCalledWith(4);
  });
});

For bonus points, I'd love to make the whole thing work when the function inside dependency.js is a default export. However, I know that spying on default exports doesn't work in Jasmine (or at least I could never get it to work), so I'm not holding out hope that it's possible in Jest either.

  • I'm using Babel for this project anyway, so I don't mind continuing to transpile imports to requires for now. Thanks for the heads up though. – Cam Jackson Nov 7 '16 at 21:54
  • what if i have ts class A and it calls some function lets say doSomething() of class B how can we mock so that class A makes call to mocked version of class B function doSomething() – kailash yogeshwar Nov 3 '17 at 9:41
  • for those who want to discover this issue more github.com/facebook/jest/issues/936 – omeralper Feb 12 at 0:18
172

I've been able to solve this by using a hack involving import *. It even works for both named and default exports!

For a named export:

// dependency.js
export const doSomething = (y) => console.log(y)

// myModule.js
import { doSomething } from './dependency';

export default (x) => {
  doSomething(x * 2);
}

// myModule-test.js
import myModule from '../myModule';
import * as dependency from '../dependency';

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    dependency.doSomething = jest.fn(); // Mutate the named export

    myModule(2);

    expect(dependency.doSomething).toBeCalledWith(4);
  });
});

Or for a default export:

// dependency.js
export default (y) => console.log(y)

// myModule.js
import dependency from './dependency'; // Note lack of curlies

export default (x) => {
  dependency(x * 2);
}

// myModule-test.js
import myModule from '../myModule';
import * as dependency from '../dependency';

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    dependency.default = jest.fn(); // Mutate the default export

    myModule(2);

    expect(dependency.default).toBeCalledWith(4); // Assert against the default
  });
});

As Mihai Damian quite rightly pointed out below, this is mutating the module object of dependency, and so it will 'leak' across to other tests. So if you use this approach you should store the original value and then set it back again after each test. To do this easily with Jest, use spyOn() method instead of jest.fn() because it supports easily restoring its original value, therefore avoiding before mentioned 'leaking'.

  • Thanks for sharing. I think the net result is similar to this - but this might be cleaner - stackoverflow.com/a/38414160/1882064 – arcseldon Jan 14 '17 at 14:27
  • 47
    This works, but it's probably not a good practice. Changes to objects outside the scope of the test seem to be persisted between tests. This can later on lead to unexpected results in other tests. – Mihai Damian May 23 '17 at 13:58
  • 4
    Not working for me. mock is failed – slideshowp2 May 31 '17 at 7:59
  • 7
    Instead of using jest.fn(), you could use jest.spyOn() so you can restore the original method later, so it does not bleed into other tests. I found nice article about different approaches here (jest.fn, jest.mock and jest.spyOn): medium.com/@rickhanlonii/understanding-jest-mocks-f0046c68e53c . – Martinsos Jul 5 '18 at 13:29
  • 2
    Just a note: if the dependency is reside on the same file as myModule, it will not work. – Lu Tran Nov 15 '18 at 19:04
120

You have to mock the module and set the spy by yourself:

import myModule from '../myModule';
import dependency from '../dependency';
jest.mock('../dependency', () => ({
  doSomething: jest.fn()
}))

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    myModule(2);
    expect(dependency.doSomething).toBeCalledWith(4);
  });
});
  • 3
    This doesn't seem right. I get: babel-plugin-jest-hoist: The second argument of jest.mock must be a function. So the code's not even compiling. – Cam Jackson Nov 7 '16 at 22:13
  • 3
    Sorry, I've update my code. Please also note that the path in jest.mock is relative to the test file. – Andreas Köberle Nov 8 '16 at 7:34
  • 1
    This did work for me, however, not when using default exports. – Iris Schaffer Feb 1 '17 at 17:28
  • 3
    @IrisSchaffer in order to have this work with the default export you need to add __esModule: true to the mock object. That's the internal flag used by the transpiled code to determine whether it's a transpiled es6 module or a commonjs module. – Johannes Lumpe May 3 '17 at 20:53
  • 12
    Mocking default exports: jest.mock('../dependency', () => ({ default: jest.fn() })) – Neob91 Jun 13 '17 at 15:19
38

Adding more to Andreas answer. I had the same problem with ES6 code but did not want to mutate the imports. That looked hacky. So I did this

import myModule from '../myModule';
import dependency from '../dependency';
jest.mock('../dependency');

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency with double the input', () => {
    myModule(2);
  });
});

And added dependency.js in " __ mocks __" folder parallel to dependency.js. This worked for me. Also, this gave me option to return suitable data from mock implementation. Make sure you give the correct path to the module you want to mock.

  • Thanks for this. Will give it a try. Liked this solution too - stackoverflow.com/a/38414160/1882064 – arcseldon Jan 14 '17 at 14:29
  • What I like about this approach is that it gives you the possibility to provide one manual mock for all occasions in which you want to mock a specific module. I for example, have a translation helper, which is used in many places. The __mocks__/translations.js file simply default exports jest.fn() in something like: export default jest.fn((id) => id) – Iris Schaffer Feb 1 '17 at 17:30
  • You can also use jest.genMockFromModule to generate mocks from modules. facebook.github.io/jest/docs/… – Varunkumar Nagarajan Jun 20 '17 at 11:33
  • 2
    One thing to note is that ES6 modules mocked via export default jest.genMockFromModule('../dependency') will have all of their functions assigned to dependency.default after calling `jest.mock('..dependency'), but otherwise behave as expected. – jhk Jul 14 '17 at 9:14
  • 6
    What does your test assertion look like? That seems like an important part of the answer. expect(???) – stone Aug 21 '17 at 21:25
37

To mock an ES6 dependency module default export using jest:

import myModule from '../myModule';
import dependency from '../dependency';

jest.mock('../dependency');

// If necessary, you can place a mock implementation like this:
dependency.mockImplementation(() => 42);

describe('myModule', () => {
  it('calls the dependency once with double the input', () => {
    myModule(2);

    expect(dependency).toHaveBeenCalledTimes(1);
    expect(dependency).toHaveBeenCalledWith(4);
  });
});

The other options didn't work for my case.

  • 6
    what's the best way to clean this up if I just want to make for one test? inside afterEach? ```` afterEach(() => { jest.unmock(../dependency'); }) ```` – nxmohamad Oct 7 '17 at 6:12
  • 1
    ah yes. thanks for pointing that out. – nxmohamad Oct 10 '17 at 16:13
  • 1
    @falsarella does doMock actually work in that case ? I'm having very similar issue and it does nothing when I'm trying to jest.doMock inside specific test, where jest.mock for whole module is working correctly – Progress1ve Feb 19 '18 at 15:47
  • 1
    @Progress1ve you can try using jest.mock with mockImplementationOnce as well – falsarella Feb 19 '18 at 17:04
  • 1
    Yup, that's a valid suggestion, however that requires the test to be the first one and I'm not a fan of writing tests in such a way. I got around those issues by importing external module and using spyOn on specific functions. – Progress1ve Feb 23 '18 at 23:04
0

I solved this another way. Let's say you have your dependency.js

export const myFunction = () => { }

I create a depdency.mock.js file besides it with the following content:

export const mockFunction = jest.fn();

jest.mock('dependency.js', () => ({ myFunction: mockFunction }));

and in the test, before I import the file that has the depedency I use:

import { mockFunction } from 'dependency.mock'
import functionThatCallsDep from './tested-code'

it('my test', () => {
    mockFunction.returnValue(false);

    functionThatCallsDep();

    expect(mockFunction).toHaveBeenCalled();

})

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