7

I want to constrain an image only if they exceed either maximum dimensions while keeping the original ratio intact.

So let's say my parameters are a max height and width of 600.

An image of 1000x1000 would become 600x600, simple enough.

An image of 2000x1000 would become 600x300. This would mean that the highest of the two values becomes 600, while the other gets constrained proportionally.

Something like this

            $image->resize(600, 600, function ($constraint) {
                $constraint->aspectRatio();
            });

What would be the best way to go about this?

EDIT:

As per the comments, I tried this:

    $medium = Image::make($file);

    $medium->resize(null, 500, function ($constraint) {
        $constraint->aspectRatio();
    });

    $medium->resize(500, null, function ($constraint) {
        $constraint->aspectRatio();
    });             
    $medium->save( public_path('/uploads/artistUploads/medium-' . $filename , 90) );    

This does not work. Only the first resize is applied, which in this case is width.

HOWEVER, turns out the original code does work. I simply assumed it wouldn't, but it does.

  • Thanks for posting your findings, it helped me out – Ben Southall Nov 29 '17 at 22:08
13

As according to the Image Intervention Docs, you can do this in 3 simple ways

// resize the image to a width of 300 and constraint aspect ratio (auto height)
$img->resize(300, null, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
});

// resize the image to a height of 200 and constraint aspect ratio (auto width)
$img->resize(null, 200, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
});

// prevent possible upsizing
$img->resize(null, 400, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
    $constraint->upsize();
});

Hope this helps...

|improve this answer|||||
  • I mean, not really. Are you saying that I should first constrain the height then the width? In a 2000x1000 scenario with 600 max, would this bring it to 600x300? – Felix Maxime Nov 7 '16 at 14:54
  • 1
    @FelixMaxime Yup in the case of defined width, the width parameter is compromised and the solution would be 600x300 whereas if the height is defined and width is given as null then the height param is compromised to 1200x600. – Saumya Rastogi Nov 7 '16 at 15:03
  • It doesn't work. It only does the first one (in this case, width). – Felix Maxime Nov 7 '16 at 17:59
9

I know I am somewhat late to the race, but I have the answer you are looking for:

$width = 600; // your max width
$height = 600; // your max height
$img = IMG::make($uploaded_file);
$img->height() > $img->width() ? $width=null : $height=null;
$img->resize($width, $height, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
});

An image of 1000x1000 would become 600x600.

An image of 2000x1000 would become 600x300. This would mean that the highest of the two values becomes 600, while the other gets constrained proportionally.

This is what this code does. Hope I can help someone.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 3
    Good answer from someone who actually understood the problem. I've been able to simplify it even further: $resized = ($img->height() > $img->width() ? $img->heighten($max_height) : $img->widen($max_width)); – Daniel Howard May 8 '19 at 12:15
1

You can use widen() and heighten() methods.

widen():

Resizes the current image to new width, constraining aspect ratio. Pass an optional Closure callback as third parameter, to apply additional constraints like preventing possible upsizing.

heighten():

Resizes the current image to new height, constraining aspect ratio. Pass an optional Closure callback as third parameter, to apply additional constraints like preventing possible upsizing.

Or you could use aspectRatio() constraint. Examples from resize() documentation:

// resize the image to a width of 300 and constrain aspect ratio (auto height)
$img->resize(300, null, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
});

// resize the image to a height of 200 and constrain aspect ratio (auto width)
$img->resize(null, 200, function ($constraint) {
    $constraint->aspectRatio();
});
|improve this answer|||||
  • Why widen and heighten? I'm trying to downsize. – Felix Maxime Nov 7 '16 at 14:52
  • @FelixMaxime, why are you thinking it's for upsizing? ) – Alexey Mezenin Nov 7 '16 at 14:56
  • Because of the dictionary definition of those terms. Maybe they mean something else in Intervention. – Felix Maxime Nov 7 '16 at 15:08
  • @FelixMaxime, well, these methods do exactly what you need, so as resize() with constraints. – Alexey Mezenin Nov 7 '16 at 15:20
0

This is my template for doing similar work

<?php

namespace App\ImageSize;

use Intervention\Image\Image;
use Intervention\Image\Filters\FilterInterface;

class Large implements FilterInterface
{
    public function applyFilter(Image $image)
    {
        $w = $image->width();
        $h = $image->height();
        if($w > $h) {
            $image->resize(1000, null, function ($constraint) {
                $constraint->aspectRatio();
            });
        } else {
            $image->resize(null, 1000, function ($constraint) {
                $constraint->aspectRatio();
            });
        }

        return $image;

    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
-1

So I was building a image preview component and I found out that if you set the max-width, max-height to the max values, then set the width,height to auto, the image aspect ratio stays intact.
https://codepen.io/kriss-robert/pen/aaNaZR?editors=1100

max-width: 100%;
max-height: 100%;
width: auto;
height: auto;

Hope that this is of any help to anyone :D

|improve this answer|||||
  • But in this "solution" for example: if you upload 10000px x 10000px image - user need to download many MB ;) – Łukasz Rząsa Sep 9 '18 at 19:44
  • Didn't think about that.. That is a problem :)) Hard-coding a srcset would help but you do hold a strong point. Then again i wouldn't think an image would be greater than 4k.. – Kriss Robert Sep 10 '18 at 23:09

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