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I'm trying to put some AIFF audio files behind a login wall on a PHP site (i.e. out of web root). The first challenge is that AIFF's are not supported in all browsers, but that's expected -- see http://www.jplayer.org/HTML5.Audio.Support/ For now I'm using Safari to test because it supports AIFFs.

What I can't figure out is why Safari treats the 2 versions of the same file differently. For the direct file, it cues up the player and it works. For the streamed file, the player doesn't work.

Regular Download

Here are what the headers look like when I download the file directly (i.e. if I temporarily put the file into web root for testing):

curl -v http://audio.app/Morse.aiff -o /dev/null
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0*   Trying 192.168.10.10...
* Connected to audio.app (192.168.10.10) port 80 (#0)
> GET /Morse.aiff HTTP/1.1
> Host: audio.app
> User-Agent: curl/7.49.1
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Server: nginx/1.8.0
< Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2016 03:19:03 GMT
< Content-Type: application/octet-stream
< Content-Length: 55530
< Last-Modified: Sat, 05 Nov 2016 21:51:02 GMT
< Connection: keep-alive
< ETag: "581e5446-d8ea"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
<
{ [5537 bytes data]
100 55530  100 55530    0     0  8991k      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 10.5M
* Connection #0 to host audio.app left intact

Through PHP

And here are the headers when I stream the file through my PHP script (named source.php):

curl -v http://audio.app/source.php?file=Morse.aiff -o /dev/null
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0*   Trying 192.168.10.10...
* Connected to audio.app (192.168.10.10) port 80 (#0)
> GET /source.php?file=Morse.aiff HTTP/1.1
> Host: audio.app
> User-Agent: curl/7.49.1
> Accept: */*
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Server: nginx/1.8.0
< Date: Sun, 06 Nov 2016 03:36:46 GMT
< Content-Type: application/octet-stream
< Content-Length: 55530
< Connection: keep-alive
< Last-Modified: Sat, 05 Nov 2016 21:51:02 GMT
< ETag: "581e5446T-d8eaO"
< Accept-Ranges: bytes
<
{ [8431 bytes data]
100 55530  100 55530    0     0  4915k      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 5422k
* Connection #0 to host audio.app left intact

The headers are almost identical -- the only difference I can make out is the order of them and the hashing algorithm my local dev box is using for the ETag value.

Here is the test PHP script (named source.php) that I'm using to stream the same file (located above webroot):

// Adapted from http://php.net/manual/en/function.readfile.php
$filename = (isset($_GET['file'])) ? $_GET['file'] : null;
// <do sanitization here>
$file = dirname(dirname(__FILE__)).'/audio/' . $filename;

// Mimicking AIFF headers from curl headers (does not work!)
$content_length = filesize($file);
$last_modified = date("D, d M Y H:i:s", filemtime($filename)). ' GMT';
header("HTTP/1.1 200 OK");
header("Content-type: application/octet-stream");
header('Content-Length: ' . $content_length);
header('Last-Modified: ' .$last_modified);
// attempts to do the same thing as NGINX... md5_file() would probably work
$etag = sprintf("\"%xT-%xO\"", filemtime($filename), $content_length);
header("ETag: $etag"); // quoting it exactly
header("Accept-Ranges: bytes");

// Output the file
readfile($file);

The expected behavior is that the browser would treat both versions the same. In my sample HTML page (adapted from http://www.w3schools.com/html/html5_audio.asp), only the direct download works -- the version of the file that's coming through PHP does not play. The same behavior happens when I hit both files in a browser directly.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h2>From Stream</h2>
<audio controls>
  <source src="/source.php?file=Morse.aiff&breakcache=<?php print uniqid(); ?>" type="audio/x-aiff">
    Your browser does not support the audio element.
</audio>
<hr/>
<h2>Direct Downloads</h2>
<audio controls>
  <source src="/Morse.aiff" type="audio/x-aiff">
  Your browser does not support the audio element.
</audio>
</body>
</html>

The same approach has worked to play mp3s (but the headers are slightly different). Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong here or does anyone know why this approach isn't working with AIFFs? I haven't yet tried this same test using another server-side language, but I suspect this isn't a PHP issue and has something to do AIFFs. Can anyone shed light on this?

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