0

when I run the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void main()
{
    int ESC;
    ESC = getchar();
    printf("\n%d", ESC);
}

it prints a value of '10', but the ascii table states it should have a value of '27'. I've tried this using scanf as well but got the same result. What is going on?

8
  • 3
    ESC has not been read by getchar(). What you're seeing is the linefeed when you pressed RETURN after having pressed ESC. Nov 7 '16 at 17:29
  • 1
    The type of ESC should be int as getchar() returns int. Press 'ESC' and then hit enter. That should ensure 'ESC' is read before the 'Return'.
    – P.P
    Nov 7 '16 at 17:32
  • 1
    We need more details on your operating system/terminal type you're using/whatever to have any hope of telling you why this is happening. Most likely the esc keypress is never making it to your program. Nov 7 '16 at 17:37
  • 2
    You are using void main(), so I guess that you are under Turbo C, getch from conio.h is what you are looking for. Nov 7 '16 at 17:38
  • 1
    That did it keine, thank you. Nov 7 '16 at 17:39
0

I found that if I use the Library #include <conio.h>, and then use the getch() function, it works perfectly.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

void main()
{
    int ESC;
    ESC = getch();
    printf("%d", ESC);
}
2
  • FYI with Windows and MSVC your original program does return 10 when Esc is entered but curiously if you enter Ctrl+[ which should be the equivalent it outputs the expected 27. So my guess is that the key is ignored, rather than its resulting value, though there is nothing about that in the MS man page for getchar. Nov 7 '16 at 17:51
  • You should not use conio.h. It's a non-standard header from very old compilers like Borland's compilers for DOS. Learning non-standard features from a compiler that's been obsolete for 20 years is not especially useful.
    – DUman
    Nov 7 '16 at 18:20

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