My objective is to reverse integer number without duplicate digit in Java How do I improve the complexity of code or is there a good/standard algorithm present?

Incase of duplicate digit, it should preserve last digit

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int n = -19890;
    System.out.println(reverseNumberWithoutDuplicate(n));
}

public static int reverseNumberWithoutDuplicate(int number) {
    boolean isNegative = (number < 0);
    number = isNegative ? number * -1 : number;

    Set<Character> lookup = new HashSet<>();

    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    char[] digits = String.valueOf(number).toCharArray();
    for (int i = digits.length - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
        if (lookup.contains(digits[i])) {
            continue;
        }
        sb.append(digits[i]);
        lookup.add(digits[i]);
    }
    return isNegative ? Integer.parseInt(sb.toString()) * -1 : Integer.parseInt(sb.toString());
}

Expected output: -981

  • 1
    Can you give what you want the output to be? For -19890 do you want 981 or 891? – Eli Sadoff Nov 7 '16 at 19:16
  • 1
    What do you mean "without duplicate number"? – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 7 '16 at 19:16
  • one digit should come once. – Saurabh Khare Nov 7 '16 at 19:18
  • 1
    i guess if the lookup hashset keeps the characters in order as they are added you could use the hash set without needing your StringBuffer sb – RAZ_Muh_Taz Nov 7 '16 at 19:23
  • @SaurabhKhare can you please update your question with that information. For instance, say that you mean the output is not the input in reverse, but specifically the input reversed after duplicate removal, and explain how you need that to work: preserve first one? preserve last one? Remove all? what happens with 172737 for instance? does it become 123, 1723, 1273, or 1237 before reversing? – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 7 '16 at 19:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The complexity is fine. Though it can be optimized.

Using StringBuilder is better than the older StringBuffer, which has unneeded overhead (for thread-safeness).

Then the data can remain numerical, and for the ten possible digits a BitSet is just fine.

public static int reverseNumberWithoutDuplicate(int number) {
    if (number == Integer.MIN_VALUE) {
        // -2147483648 is a special case, not negatable.
        return -8463712;
    }
    boolean isNegative = number < 0;
    number = isNegative ? -number : number;

    BitSet usedDigits = new BitSet(10);
    int reversedNumber = 0;
    while (number != 0) {
        int digit = number % 10;
        number /= 10;
        if (!usedDigits.get(digit)) {
            usedDigits.set(digit);
            reversedNumber = 10 * reversedNumber + digit;
        }
    }
    return isNegative ? -reversedNumber : reversedNumber;
}
  • Input: Integer.MIN_VALUE – Durandal Nov 7 '16 at 20:51
  • @Durandal (I knew it then) but actually the full-domain solution is not that hard, so I apologise, and added it - as special case, in order not to deal with negative modulos and such. – Joop Eggen Nov 8 '16 at 18:33

Let's build a solution step-by step. The following function reverses digits of the positive number.

int reverseNumber(int number) {
    int answer = 0;
    for (int n = number; n != 0; n /= 10) {
        // Digits are taken from least significant to most significant
        int digit = n % 10; 
        // And added the other way round
        answer = answer * 10 + digit;
    }
    return answer;
}

This code could be easily adapted to work with negative numbers to:

int reverseNumber(int number) {
    if (number < 0) {
        return -reverseNumber(-number);
    }
    // The rest is the same

Our next target -- skip duplicate digits. We will track a list of the already seen digits in the boolean[] seen.

private static int reverseNumberWithoutDuplicate(int number) {
    if (number < 0) {
        return -reverseNumberWithoutDuplicate(-number);
    }

    boolean[] seen = new boolean[10];
    int answer = 0;
    for (int n = number; n != 0; n /= 10) {
        int digit = n % 10;            
        if (!seen[digit]) {
            seen[digit] = true;
            answer = answer * 10 + digit;
        }
    }
    return answer;
}

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