72

I'm trying to create a unit test for a class that calls into an async repository. I'm using ASP.NET Core and Entity Framework Core. My generic repository looks like this.

public class EntityRepository<TEntity> : IEntityRepository<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    private readonly SaasDispatcherDbContext _dbContext;
    private readonly DbSet<TEntity> _dbSet;

    public EntityRepository(SaasDispatcherDbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
        _dbSet = dbContext.Set<TEntity>();
    }

    public virtual IQueryable<TEntity> GetAll()
    {
        return _dbSet;
    }

    public virtual async Task<TEntity> FindByIdAsync(int id)
    {
        return await _dbSet.FindAsync(id);
    }

    public virtual IQueryable<TEntity> FindBy(Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> predicate)
    {
        return _dbSet.Where(predicate);
    }

    public virtual void Add(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbSet.Add(entity);
    }
    public virtual void Delete(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbSet.Remove(entity);
    }

    public virtual void Update(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbContext.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }

    public virtual async Task SaveChangesAsync()
    {
        await _dbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    }
}

Then I have a service class that calls FindBy and FirstOrDefaultAsync on an instance of the repository:

    public async Task<Uri> GetCompanyProductURLAsync(Guid externalCompanyID, string productCode, Guid loginToken)
    {            
        CompanyProductUrl companyProductUrl = await _Repository.FindBy(u => u.Company.ExternalCompanyID == externalCompanyID && u.Product.Code == productCode.Trim()).FirstOrDefaultAsync();

        if (companyProductUrl == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        var builder = new UriBuilder(companyProductUrl.Url);
        builder.Query = $"-s{loginToken.ToString()}";

        return builder.Uri;
    }

I'm trying to mock the repository call in my test below:

    [Fact]
    public async Task GetCompanyProductURLAsync_ReturnsNullForInvalidCompanyProduct()
    {
        var companyProducts = Enumerable.Empty<CompanyProductUrl>().AsQueryable();

        var mockRepository = new Mock<IEntityRepository<CompanyProductUrl>>();
        mockRepository.Setup(r => r.FindBy(It.IsAny<Expression<Func<CompanyProductUrl, bool>>>())).Returns(companyProducts);

        var service = new CompanyProductService(mockRepository.Object);

        var result = await service.GetCompanyProductURLAsync(Guid.NewGuid(), "wot", Guid.NewGuid());

        Assert.Null(result);
    }

However, when the test executes the call to the repository, I get the following error:

The provider for the source IQueryable doesn't implement IAsyncQueryProvider. Only providers that implement IEntityQueryProvider can be used for Entity Framework asynchronous operations.

How can I properly mock the repository to get this to work?

93

Thanks to @Nkosi for pointing me to a link with an example of doing the same thing in EF 6: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn314429.aspx. This didn't work exactly as-is with EF Core, but I was able to start with it and make modifications to get it working. Below are the test classes that I created to "mock" IAsyncQueryProvider:

internal class TestAsyncQueryProvider<TEntity> : IAsyncQueryProvider
{
    private readonly IQueryProvider _inner;

    internal TestAsyncQueryProvider(IQueryProvider inner)
    {
        _inner = inner;
    }

    public IQueryable CreateQuery(Expression expression)
    {
        return new TestAsyncEnumerable<TEntity>(expression);
    }

    public IQueryable<TElement> CreateQuery<TElement>(Expression expression)
    {
        return new TestAsyncEnumerable<TElement>(expression);
    }

    public object Execute(Expression expression)
    {
        return _inner.Execute(expression);
    }

    public TResult Execute<TResult>(Expression expression)
    {
        return _inner.Execute<TResult>(expression);
    }

    public IAsyncEnumerable<TResult> ExecuteAsync<TResult>(Expression expression)
    {
        return new TestAsyncEnumerable<TResult>(expression);
    }

    public Task<TResult> ExecuteAsync<TResult>(Expression expression, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return Task.FromResult(Execute<TResult>(expression));
    }
}

internal class TestAsyncEnumerable<T> : EnumerableQuery<T>, IAsyncEnumerable<T>, IQueryable<T>
{
    public TestAsyncEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
        : base(enumerable)
    { }

    public TestAsyncEnumerable(Expression expression)
        : base(expression)
    { }

    public IAsyncEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new TestAsyncEnumerator<T>(this.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator());
    }

    IQueryProvider IQueryable.Provider
    {
        get { return new TestAsyncQueryProvider<T>(this); }
    }
}

internal class TestAsyncEnumerator<T> : IAsyncEnumerator<T>
{
    private readonly IEnumerator<T> _inner;

    public TestAsyncEnumerator(IEnumerator<T> inner)
    {
        _inner = inner;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _inner.Dispose();
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get
        {
            return _inner.Current;
        }
    }

    public Task<bool> MoveNext(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return Task.FromResult(_inner.MoveNext());
    }
}

And here is my updated test case that uses these classes:

[Fact]
public async Task GetCompanyProductURLAsync_ReturnsNullForInvalidCompanyProduct()
{
    var companyProducts = Enumerable.Empty<CompanyProductUrl>().AsQueryable();

    var mockSet = new Mock<DbSet<CompanyProductUrl>>();

    mockSet.As<IAsyncEnumerable<CompanyProductUrl>>()
        .Setup(m => m.GetEnumerator())
        .Returns(new TestAsyncEnumerator<CompanyProductUrl>(companyProducts.GetEnumerator()));

    mockSet.As<IQueryable<CompanyProductUrl>>()
        .Setup(m => m.Provider)
        .Returns(new TestAsyncQueryProvider<CompanyProductUrl>(companyProducts.Provider));

    mockSet.As<IQueryable<CompanyProductUrl>>().Setup(m => m.Expression).Returns(companyProducts.Expression);
    mockSet.As<IQueryable<CompanyProductUrl>>().Setup(m => m.ElementType).Returns(companyProducts.ElementType);
    mockSet.As<IQueryable<CompanyProductUrl>>().Setup(m => m.GetEnumerator()).Returns(() => companyProducts.GetEnumerator());

    var contextOptions = new DbContextOptions<SaasDispatcherDbContext>();
    var mockContext = new Mock<SaasDispatcherDbContext>(contextOptions);
    mockContext.Setup(c => c.Set<CompanyProductUrl>()).Returns(mockSet.Object);

    var entityRepository = new EntityRepository<CompanyProductUrl>(mockContext.Object);

    var service = new CompanyProductService(entityRepository);

    var result = await service.GetCompanyProductURLAsync(Guid.NewGuid(), "wot", Guid.NewGuid());

    Assert.Null(result);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Glad you eventually figured it out. I was digging in the source code on github to see if they had any moq examples. Funny enough I was investigating one when I check and saw that you came to your own solution. Cool. – Nkosi Nov 8 '16 at 16:24
  • I would convert that to an extension method so you can reuse it in your tests. – Nkosi Nov 8 '16 at 16:25
  • 2
    Check answer given here which references this answer where the extension method was used. Happy coding!!! – Nkosi Nov 9 '16 at 14:12
  • Thanks again, @Nkosi! – Jed Veatch Nov 9 '16 at 15:33
  • 2
    Would you be willing to update this to core 3.0? I can't get passed "Argument expression is not valid" on _inner.Execute<TResults>(expression) – BillRob Mar 16 at 22:38
41

Try to use my Moq/NSubstitute/FakeItEasy extension MockQueryable: https://github.com/romantitov/MockQueryable supported all Sync/Async operations

//1 - create a List<T> with test items
var users = new List<UserEntity>()
{
 new UserEntity,
 ...
};

//2 - build mock by extension
var mock = users.AsQueryable().BuildMock();

//3 - setup the mock as Queryable for Moq
_userRepository.Setup(x => x.GetQueryable()).Returns(mock.Object);

//3 - setup the mock as Queryable for NSubstitute
_userRepository.GetQueryable().Returns(mock);

DbSet also supported

//2 - build mock by extension
var mock = users.AsQueryable().BuildMockDbSet();

//3 - setup DbSet for Moq
var userRepository = new TestDbSetRepository(mock.Object);

//3 - setup DbSet for NSubstitute
var userRepository = new TestDbSetRepository(mock);

Note:

  • AutoMapper is also supported from 1.0.4 ver
  • DbQuery supported from 1.1.0 ver
  • EF Core 3.0 supported from 3.0.0 ver
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    This seems to be a really nice package to use instead of writing a bunch of double implementation for a fake IAsyncQueryProvider etc. – infl3x Jun 26 '18 at 1:32
  • 1
    This is a great package, which did the trick right away. Thanks! – Sigge Jul 30 '19 at 18:34
  • 1
    @Noob try to open link from my comment, or just take a look github.com/romantitov/MockQueryable/blob/master/src/… – R.Titov Sep 30 '19 at 19:36
  • 1
    @Noob in MyService.CreateUserIfNotExist I use FirstOrDefaultAsync, and here you can see tests for CreateUserIfNotExist logic github.com/romantitov/MockQueryable/blob/master/src/… – R.Titov Jan 2 at 8:42
  • 1
    @R.Titov thanks, I found my mistake, first I wasn't mocking my data I was supposed to return and secondly, creating the mock inside the return(), gave also some other error. Anyway, got it working now, thanks!! – Noob Jan 2 at 10:22
8

Much less code solution. Use the in-memory db context which should take care of bootstrapping all the sets for you. You no longer need to mock out the DbSet on your context but if you want to return data from a service for example, you can simply return the actual set data of the in-memory context.

DbContextOptions< SaasDispatcherDbContext > options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder< SaasDispatcherDbContext >()
  .UseInMemoryDatabase(Guid.NewGuid().ToString())
  .Options;

  _db = new SaasDispatcherDbContext(optionsBuilder: options);
| improve this answer | |
  • This seems like a good solution. Why not? Add a reference to the in-memory nuget package to get the UseInMemoryDatabase extension method. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/miscellaneous/testing/… – andrew Jun 5 '18 at 11:31
  • Would this not be a form of integration test? I know it is an in-memory database, but you will be testing against a system which is what integration tests are. Correct me if I am wrong. – elfico Mar 26 at 2:45
2

I'm maintaining two open-source projects that do the heavy lifting of setting up the mocks and actually emulates SaveChanges(Async).

For EF Core: https://github.com/huysentruitw/entity-framework-core-mock

For EF6: https://github.com/huysentruitw/entity-framework-mock

Both projects have Nuget packages with integration for Moq or NSubstitute.

| improve this answer | |
1

Here is a port of the accepted answer to F#, I just did it for myself and thought it may save someone the time. I have also updated the example to match the updated C#8 IAsyncEnumarable API and tweaked the Mock setup to be generic.

    type TestAsyncEnumerator<'T> (inner : IEnumerator<'T> ) =     

        let inner : IEnumerator<'T> = inner

        interface IAsyncEnumerator<'T> with
            member this.Current with get() = inner.Current
            member this.MoveNextAsync () = ValueTask<bool>(Task.FromResult(inner.MoveNext()))
            member this.DisposeAsync () = ValueTask(Task.FromResult(inner.Dispose))

    type TestAsyncEnumerable<'T> =       
        inherit EnumerableQuery<'T>

        new (enumerable : IEnumerable<'T>) = 
            { inherit EnumerableQuery<'T> (enumerable) }
        new (expression : Expression) = 
            { inherit EnumerableQuery<'T> (expression) }

        interface IAsyncEnumerable<'T> with
            member this.GetAsyncEnumerator cancellationToken : IAsyncEnumerator<'T> =
                 new TestAsyncEnumerator<'T>(this.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator())
                 :> IAsyncEnumerator<'T>

        interface IQueryable<'T> with
            member this.Provider with get() = new TestAsyncQueryProvider<'T>(this) :> IQueryProvider

    and 
        TestAsyncQueryProvider<'TEntity> 
        (inner : IQueryProvider) =       

        let inner : IQueryProvider = inner

        interface IAsyncQueryProvider with

            member this.Execute (expression : Expression) =
                inner.Execute expression

            member this.Execute<'TResult> (expression : Expression) =
                inner.Execute<'TResult> expression

            member this.ExecuteAsync<'TResult> ((expression : Expression), cancellationToken) =
                inner.Execute<'TResult> expression

            member this.CreateQuery (expression : Expression) =
                new TestAsyncEnumerable<'TEntity>(expression) :> IQueryable

            member this.CreateQuery<'TElement> (expression : Expression) =
                new TestAsyncEnumerable<'TElement>(expression) :> IQueryable<'TElement>


    let getQueryableMockDbSet<'T when 'T : not struct>
        (sourceList : 'T seq) : Mock<DbSet<'T>> =

        let queryable = sourceList.AsQueryable();

        let dbSet = new Mock<DbSet<'T>>()

        dbSet.As<IAsyncEnumerable<'T>>()
            .Setup(fun m -> m.GetAsyncEnumerator())
            .Returns(TestAsyncEnumerator<'T>(queryable.GetEnumerator())) |> ignore

        dbSet.As<IQueryable<'T>>()
            .SetupGet(fun m -> m.Provider)
            .Returns(TestAsyncQueryProvider<'T>(queryable.Provider)) |> ignore

        dbSet.As<IQueryable<'T>>().Setup(fun m -> m.Expression).Returns(queryable.Expression) |> ignore
        dbSet.As<IQueryable<'T>>().Setup(fun m -> m.ElementType).Returns(queryable.ElementType) |> ignore
        dbSet.As<IQueryable<'T>>().Setup(fun m -> m.GetEnumerator ()).Returns(queryable.GetEnumerator ()) |> ignore
        dbSet
| improve this answer | |
  • You may want to ask a new question that refers to F# and answer with one. It does not belong to here. – ilkerkaran Jan 13 at 13:33
  • 2
    The question does not mention the language. I also improved upon the accepted answer by adhering to the latest API. I don't think that deserves a markdown as it is useful. I am adding extra information for .Net programmers who land here. – Ryan Jan 13 at 19:22
  • 1
    It contains C# tag – ilkerkaran Jan 14 at 9:46
  • Either way man, I am not hurting anyone or clouding the topic, I am adding more useful information that is related directly to the question. I think you have been unfair but that is your perogative I guess. – Ryan Jan 15 at 10:22

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