59

I type git tag and it lists my current tags:

1.2.3
1.2.4

How can I determine which of these is annotated, and which is lightweight?

  • 3
    does git tag -n do anything for you? – Oxymoron Nov 8 '16 at 5:38
  • A tag annotation is not a commit message. You can't see it with git-log(1); you need to use git-show(1) – Oxymoron Nov 8 '16 at 5:42
  • git tag -n was interesting! But it's not bulletproof for my specific problem. – G. Sylvie Davies Nov 8 '16 at 6:25
  • 1
    I'm liking "git show-ref -d --tags". – G. Sylvie Davies Nov 8 '16 at 6:30
45

git for-each-ref tells you what each ref is to by default, its id and its type. To restrict it to just tags, do git for-each-ref refs/tags.

[T]he output has three fields: The hash of an object, the type of the object, and the name in refs/tags that refers to the object. A so-called "lightweight" tag is a name in refs/tags that refers to a commit object. An "annotated" tag is a name in refs/tags that refers to a tag object.

- Solomon Slow (in the comments)

  • 6
    When I tried this, the output listed each tag as either a commit or a tag. I presume those indicate lightweight and annotated tags respectively? – Stevoisiak Apr 17 '17 at 18:49
  • 2
    @StevenVascellaro That's correct, a lightweight tag is just the local ref starting "refs/tags", it can be to anything. A tag in the object db has more than just a name and can get shipped around like any other object. Git makes local refs for every tag in the object db so the distinction is somewhat blurred, generally nobody has to care much once the workflow's set up for their project. – jthill Apr 17 '17 at 19:19
  • 3
    So commit is lightweight and tag is annotated? – Pontiacks May 30 '18 at 9:59
  • 5
    @Pontiacks, the output has three fields: The hash of an object, the type of the object, and the name in refs/tags that refers to the object. A so-called "lightweight" tag is a name in refs/tags that refers to a commit object. An "annotated" tag is a name in refs/tags that refers to a tag object. – Solomon Slow May 30 '18 at 17:26
37

The git show-ref -d --tags command sort of does it, since lightweight tags occur once in the output, and annotated tags occur twice. Also, only annotated tags include the "^{}" dereference operator in the output.

588e9261795ec6dda4bd0a881cf1a86848e3d975 refs/tags/1.2.3
7fe2caaed1b02bb6dae0305c5c0f2592e7080a7a refs/tags/1.2.4
588e9261795ec6dda4bd0a881cf1a86848e3d975 refs/tags/1.2.4^{}

And that output can than be massaged with the unix sort, sed, cut, and uniq commands to make the output more readable:

git show-ref -d --tags       | 
cut -b 42-                   | # to remove the commit-id
sort                         |
sed 's/\^{}//'               | # remove ^{} markings
uniq -c                      | # count identical lines
sed 's/2\ refs\/tags\// a /' | # 2 identicals = annotated
sed 's/1\ refs\/tags\//lw /'   

For my original repo (from my question) it outputs this:

  lw 1.2.3
   a 1.2.4

(e.g., 1.2.3 was "lightweight" and "1.2.4" was annotated).

18

Get the tag name (say foo) and then do a git cat-file -t foo. If it's an an annotated tag, cat-file will tell you that it's a "tag". If it's a simple tag, cat-file will tell you that it's a "commit".

Update: As oxymoron said in his comment, git show works too but it gives you more information than just what kind of tag it is.

  • 2
    For "a given tag" (as stated in the question), this seems by far the best answer. – phils Aug 21 '19 at 6:26
  • 1
    Excellent answer - key to how this works is the "-t" option on "git cat-file." As the man page explains: "-t Instead of the content, show the object type identified by <object>." – G. Sylvie Davies Aug 21 '19 at 23:28
12

Please try using git describe

https://git-scm.com/docs/git-describe

By default (without --all or --tags) git describe only shows annotated tags.

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