7414

I always thought Java uses pass-by-reference.

However, I've seen a blog post that claims that Java uses pass-by-value.

I don't think I understand the distinction they're making.

What is the explanation?

11
  • 4
    We would more commonly say that a variable "passed-by-reference" can be mutated. The term appears in textbooks because language theorists needed a way to distinguish how you treat primitive data types (int, bool, byte) from complex and structured objects (array, streams, class) -- that is to say, those of possibly unbounded memory allocation.
    – jlau
    Aug 4, 2020 at 11:35
  • 3
    I want to note that you do not have to think about this in most cases. I programmed java for many years until i learned c++. Until this point in time i had no clue what pass-by-reference and pass-by-value are. The intuitive solution always worked for me, which is why java is one of the best languages for beginners. So if you currently are worried, if your function needs a reference or a value, just pass it as it is and you will be fine.
    – Tobias
    Oct 20, 2020 at 11:44
  • 44
    Java pass the reference by value. Oct 20, 2020 at 19:05
  • 13
    Putting it very concisely, this confusion arises because in Java all non-primitive data types are handled/accessed by references. However, passing is always be value. So for all non-primitive types reference is passed by its value. All primitive types are also passed by value. Nov 10, 2020 at 6:56
  • 4
    I found this quite helpful: baeldung.com/java-pass-by-value-or-pass-by-reference Jan 20, 2021 at 9:52

92 Answers 92

8

Shortest answer :)

  • Java has pass-by-value (and pass-reference-by-value.)
  • C# also has pass-by-reference

In C# this is accomplished with the "out" and "ref" keywords.

Pass By Reference: The variable is passed in such a way that a reassignment inside the method is reflected even outside the method.

Here follows an example of passing-by-reference (C#). This feature does not exist in java.

class Example
{
    static void InitArray(out int[] arr)
    {
        arr = new int[5] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        int[] someArray;
        InitArray(out someArray);

        // This is true !
        boolean isTrue = (someArray[0] == 1);
    }
}

See also: MSDN library (C#): passing arrays by ref and out

See also: MSDN library (C#): passing by by value and by reference

2
  • in java we can do: someArray = InitArray(someArray) assuming we have this: static int [] InitArray( int[] arr){ ... return ...}
    – Kachna
    Feb 27, 2016 at 11:06
  • You are correct. That's a possible alternative for a simple pass-by-reference. But pass-by-reference can do more powerful things. e.g. it could assign multiple values: e.g. int[] array1; int[] array2; InnitArrays(out array1, out array2); assuming that you create a method static void InitArray(out int[] a1, out int[] a2){...}
    – bvdb
    Feb 27, 2016 at 16:28
8

Simple program

import java.io.*;
class Aclass
{
    public int a;
}
public class test
{
    public static void foo_obj(Aclass obj)
    {
        obj.a=5;
    }
    public static void foo_int(int a)
    {
        a=3;
    }
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        //test passing an object
        Aclass ob = new Aclass();
        ob.a=0;
        foo_obj(ob);
        System.out.println(ob.a);//prints 5

        //test passing an integer
        int i=0;
        foo_int(i);
        System.out.println(i);//prints 0
    }
}

From a C/C++ programmer's point of view, java uses pass by value, so for primitive data types (int, char etc) changes in the function does not reflect in the calling function. But when you pass an object and in the function you change its data members or call member functions which can change the state of the object, the calling function will get the changes.

2
  • 1
    You can only define one class per file. This is not including nested and inner classes. Considering this will be something a new programmer will be reading, you should explain this to the user; allowing them to duplicate the code on their machine.
    – mrres1
    Jan 25, 2015 at 1:30
  • 2
    @mrres1 Not entirely correct. You can define only one public top-level class/interface per file. Supporting several classes per file is a remnant from the first Java version, which didn't have nested classes, but it is still supported, though often frowned upon.
    – MrBackend
    Mar 19, 2015 at 13:53
8

There is a very simple way to understand this. Lets's take C++ pass by reference.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Foo {
    private:
        int x;
    public:
        Foo(int val) {x = val;}
        void foo()
        {
            cout<<x<<endl;
        }
};

void bar(Foo& ref)
{
    ref.foo();
    ref = *(new Foo(99));
    ref.foo();
}

int main()
{
   Foo f = Foo(1);
   f.foo();
   bar(f);
   f.foo();

   return 0;
}

What is the outcome?

1
1
99
99

So, after bar() assigned a new value to a "reference" passed in, it actually changed the one which was passed in from main itself, explaining the last f.foo() call from main printing 99.

Now, lets see what java says.

public class Ref {

    private static class Foo {
        private int x;

        private Foo(int x) {
            this.x = x;
        }

        private void foo() {
            System.out.println(x);
        }
    }

    private static void bar(Foo f) {
        f.foo();
        f = new Foo(99);
        f.foo();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Foo f = new Foo(1);
        System.out.println(f.x);
        bar(f);
        System.out.println(f.x);
    }

}

It says:

1
1
99
1

Voilà, the reference of Foo in main that was passed to bar, is still unchanged!

This example clearly shows that java is not the same as C++ when we say "pass by reference". Essentially, java is passing "references" as "values" to functions, meaning java is pass by value.

5
  • Is there an issue in your c++ version where your risking a segfault when Foo(99) goes out of scope but you reference it in your main method?
    – matt
    Jun 15, 2016 at 8:14
  • Indeed. Ah comes from using java for 10 years. But the idea still holds. And I fixed it now. Jun 16, 2016 at 15:16
  • I think the previous was better because it would compile. I was just curious about the behavior, sorry about that.
    – matt
    Jun 16, 2016 at 17:41
  • 1
    This answer only helps for those coming from C++ background who are willing to define "reference" the way you have, according to C++'s definition. That is not always the case.
    – Loduwijk
    Aug 2, 2017 at 15:41
  • "What is the outcome?" - Guess a memory leak Dec 6, 2021 at 18:53
8

Java is only passed by value. there is no pass by reference, for example, you can see the following example.

package com.asok.cop.example.task;
public class Example {
    int data = 50;

    void change(int data) {
        data = data + 100;// changes will be in the local variable 
        System.out.println("after add " + data);
        }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Example op = new Example();
        System.out.println("before change " + op.data);
        op.change(500);
        System.out.println("after change " + op.data);
    }
}

Output:

before change 50
after add 600
after change 50

as Michael says in the comments:

objects are still passed by value even though operations on them behave like pass-by-reference. Consider void changePerson(Person person){ person = new Person(); } the callers reference to the person object will remain unchanged. Objects themselves are passed by value but their members can be affected by changes. To be true pass-by-reference, we would have to be able to reassign the argument to a new object and have the change be reflected in the caller.

2
  • Describing java as "pass-by-value" is highly misleading. For non-primitive types Java uses "pass by value of the reference". "Pass by value" implies the value is copied when passed to a method. It is not, the reference is copied. May 3, 2019 at 12:18
  • Not half the answer. Sep 5, 2021 at 13:15
8

A: Java does manipulate objects by reference, and all object variables are references. However, Java doesn't pass method arguments by reference; it passes them by value.

Take the badSwap() method for example:

public void badSwap(int var1, int var2)
{
  int temp = var1;
  var1 = var2;
  var2 = temp;
}

When badSwap() returns, the variables passed as arguments will still hold their original values. The method will also fail if we change the arguments type from int to Object, since Java passes object references by value as well. Now, here is where it gets tricky:

public void tricky(Point arg1, Point arg2)
{
  arg1.x = 100;
  arg1.y = 100;
  Point temp = arg1;
  arg1 = arg2;
  arg2 = temp;
}
public static void main(String [] args)
{
  Point pnt1 = new Point(0,0);
  Point pnt2 = new Point(0,0);
  System.out.println("X: " + pnt1.x + " Y: " +pnt1.y); 
  System.out.println("X: " + pnt2.x + " Y: " +pnt2.y);
  System.out.println(" ");
  tricky(pnt1,pnt2);
  System.out.println("X: " + pnt1.x + " Y:" + pnt1.y); 
  System.out.println("X: " + pnt2.x + " Y: " +pnt2.y);  
}

If we execute this main() method, we see the following output:

X: 0 Y: 0
X: 0 Y: 0
X: 100 Y: 100
X: 0 Y: 0

The method successfully alters the value of pnt1, even though it is passed by value; however, a swap of pnt1 and pnt2 fails! This is the major source of confusion. In the main() method, pnt1 and pnt2 are nothing more than object references. When you pass pnt1 and pnt2 to the tricky() method, Java passes the references by value just like any other parameter. This means the references passed to the method are actually copies of the original references. Figure 1 below shows two references pointing to the same object after Java passes an object to a method.

enter image description here
Figure 1. After being passed to a method, an object will have at least two references

Java copies and passes the reference by value, not the object. Thus, method manipulation will alter the objects, since the references point to the original objects. But since the references are copies, swaps will fail.The method references swap, but not the original references. Unfortunately, after a method call, you are left with only the unswapped original references. For a swap to succeed outside of the method call, we need to swap the original references, not the copies.

8

Java always passes parameters by value.
All object references in Java are passed by value. This means that a copy of the value will be passed to a method. But the trick is that passing a copy of the value also changes the real value of the object.

Please refer to the below example,

public class ObjectReferenceExample {

    public static void main(String... doYourBest) {
            Student student = new Student();
            transformIntoHomer(student);
            System.out.println(student.name);
    }

    static void transformIntoDuleepa(Student student) {
            student.name = "Duleepa";
    }
}
class Student {
    String name;
}

In this case, it will be Duleepa!
The reason is that Java object variables are simply references that point to real objects in the memory heap. Therefore, even though Java passes parameters to methods by value, if the variable points to an object reference, the real object will also be changed.

2
  • Running this program should help anyone understand this concept. pastebin.com/VEc8NQcX
    – Mohith7548
    Nov 3, 2020 at 10:26
  • In this example you've not copied the Student object, so I think saying "passing a copy of the value also changes the real value of the object" is misleading. The thing that you are copying, and passing-by-value, is the reference to the object. The object stays living on the heap, and there's just one of them. That's why when you use the new reference to mutate the object, you're mutating it for everyone else that has a reference to the object. There's only one object. When the argument of the function is a primitive type, not a reference to an object, it is also copied.
    – Chrispher
    Nov 14, 2020 at 11:57
8

Java is always pass by value, not pass by reference

First of all, we need to understand what pass by value and pass by reference are.

Pass by value means that you are making a copy in memory of the actual parameter's value that is passed in. This is a copy of the contents of the actual parameter.

Pass by reference (also called pass by address) means that a copy of the address of the actual parameter is stored.

Sometimes Java can give the illusion of pass by reference. Let's see how it works by using the example below:

public class PassByValue {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test t = new Test();
        t.name = "initialvalue";
        new PassByValue().changeValue(t);
        System.out.println(t.name);
    }
    
    public void changeValue(Test f) {
        f.name = "changevalue";
    }
}

class Test {
    String name;
}

The output of this program is:

changevalue
Let's understand step by step:

Test t = new Test(); As we all know it will create an object in the heap and return the reference value back to t. For example, suppose the value of t is 0x100234 (we don't know the actual JVM internal value, this is just an example) .

first illustration

new PassByValue().changeValue(t);

When passing reference t to the function it will not directly pass the actual reference value of object test, but it will create a copy of t and then pass it to the function. Since it is passing by value, it passes a copy of the variable rather than the actual reference of it. Since we said the value of t was 0x100234, both t and f will have the same value and hence they will point to the same object.

second illustration

If you change anything in the function using reference f it will modify the existing contents of the object. That is why we got the output changevalue, which is updated in the function.

To understand this more clearly, consider the following example:

public class PassByValue {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test t = new Test();
        t.name = "initialvalue";
        new PassByValue().changeRefence(t);
        System.out.println(t.name);
    }
    
    public void changeRefence(Test f) {
        f = null;
    }
}

class Test {
    String name;
}

Will this throw a NullPointerException? No, because it only passes a copy of the reference. In the case of passing by reference, it could have thrown a NullPointerException, as seen below:

third illustration

Hopefully this will help.

1
  • "Since we said the value of t was 0x100234, both t and f will have the same value and hence they will point to the same object." - That doesn't sound right. Creating a copy of an object should not mean the copy and the original both point to the same object. This smells like pass-by-reference, or minimally, pass-by-object-reference
    – h0r53
    Oct 19, 2021 at 16:25
7

Mr @Scott Stanchfield wrote an excellent answer. Here is the class that would you to verify exactly what he meant:

public class Dog {

    String dog ;
    static int x_static;
    int y_not_static;

    public String getName()
    {
        return this.dog;
    }

    public Dog(String dog)
    {
        this.dog = dog;
    }

    public void setName(String name)
    {
        this.dog = name;
    }

    public static void foo(Dog someDog)
    {
        x_static = 1;
        // y_not_static = 2;  // not possible !!
        someDog.setName("Max");     // AAA
        someDog = new Dog("Fifi");  // BBB
        someDog.setName("Rowlf");   // CCC
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Dog myDog = new Dog("Rover");
        foo(myDog);
        System.out.println(myDog.getName());
    }
}

So, we pass from main() a dog called Rover, then we assign a new address to the pointer that we passed, but at the end, the name of the dog is not Rover, and not Fifi, and certainly not Rowlf, but Max.

7

Understand it in 2 Steps:

You can't change the reference to the object itself but you can work with this passed parameter as a reference to the object.

If you want to change the value behind the reference you will only declare a new variable on the stack with the same name 'd'. Look at the references with the sign @ and you will find out that the reference has been changed.

public static void foo(Dog d) {
  d.Name = "belly";
  System.out.println(d); //Reference: Dog@1540e19d

  d = new Dog("wuffwuff");
  System.out.println(d); //Dog@677327b6
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{
  Dog lisa = new Dog("Lisa");
  foo(lisa);
  System.out.println(lisa.Name); //belly
}
7

I tried to simplify the examples above, keeping only the essense of the problem. Let me present this as a story that is easy to remember and apply correctly. The story goes like this: You have a pet dog, Jimmy, whose tail is 12 inches long. You leave it with a vet for a few weeks while you are travelling abroad.

The vet doesn't like the long tail of Jimmy, so he wants to cut it by half. But being a good vet, he knows that he has no right to mutilate other people's dogs. So he first makes a clone of the dog (with the new key word) and cuts the tail of the clone. When the dog finally returns to you, it has the original 12 inch tail in tact. Happy ending !

The next time you travel, you take the dog, unwittingly, to a wicked vet. He is also a hater of long tails, so he cuts it down to a miserable 2 inches. But he does this to your dear Jimmy, not a clone of it. When you return, you are shocked to see Jimmy pathetically wagging a 2 inch stub.

Moral of the story: When you pass on your pet, you are giving away whole and unfettered custody of the pet to the vet. He is free to play any kind of havoc with it. Passing by value, by reference, by pointer are all just technical wrangling. Unless the vet clones it first, he ends up mutilating the original dog.

public class Doggie {

    public static void main(String...args) {
        System.out.println("At the owner's home:");
        Dog d = new Dog(12);
        d.wag();
        goodVet(d);
        System.out.println("With the owner again:)");
        d.wag();
        badVet(d);
        System.out.println("With the owner again(:");
        d.wag();
    }

    public static void goodVet (Dog dog) {
        System.out.println("At the good vet:");
        dog.wag();
        dog = new Dog(12); // create a clone
        dog.cutTail(6);    // cut the clone's tail
        dog.wag();
    }

    public static void badVet (Dog dog) {
        System.out.println("At the bad vet:");
        dog.wag();
        dog.cutTail(2);   // cut the original dog's tail
        dog.wag();
    }    
}

class Dog {

    int tailLength;

    public Dog(int originalLength) {
        this.tailLength = originalLength;
    }

    public void cutTail (int newLength) {
        this.tailLength = newLength;
    }

    public void wag()  {
        System.out.println("Wagging my " +tailLength +" inch tail");
    }
}

Output:
At the owner's home:
Wagging my 12 inch tail
At the good vet:
Wagging my 12 inch tail
Wagging my 6 inch tail
With the owner again:)
Wagging my 12 inch tail
At the bad vet:
Wagging my 12 inch tail
Wagging my 2 inch tail
With the owner again(:
Wagging my 2 inch tail
0
6

There is a workaround in Java for the reference. Let me explain by this example:

public class Yo {
public static void foo(int x){
    System.out.println(x); //out 2
    x = x+2;
    System.out.println(x); // out 4
}
public static void foo(int[] x){
    System.out.println(x[0]); //1
    x[0] = x[0]+2;
    System.out.println(x[0]); //3
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int t = 2;
    foo(t);
    System.out.println(t); // out 2 (t did not change in foo)

    int[] tab = new int[]{1};
    foo(tab);
    System.out.println(tab[0]); // out 3 (tab[0] did change in foo)
}}

I hope this helps!

1
  • To understand this, one needs to understand that unlike in many languages in Java an array is an Object itself.
    – v010dya
    Apr 21, 2021 at 13:46
6

Java does manipulate objects by reference, and all object variables are references. However, Java doesn't pass method arguments by reference; it passes them by value.

Take the badSwap() method for example:

    public void badSwap(int var1, int
 var2{ int temp = var1; var1 = var2; var2 =
 temp; }

When badSwap() returns, the variables passed as arguments will still hold their original values. The method will also fail if we change the arguments type from int to Object, since Java passes object references by value as well. Now, here is where it gets tricky:

public void tricky(Point arg1, Point   arg2)
{ arg1.x = 100; arg1.y = 100; Point temp = arg1; arg1 = arg2; arg2 = temp; }
public static void main(String [] args) { 

 Point pnt1 = new Point(0,0); Point pnt2
 = new Point(0,0); System.out.println("X:
 " + pnt1.x + " Y: " +pnt1.y);

     System.out.println("X: " + pnt2.x + " Y:
 " +pnt2.y); System.out.println(" ");

     tricky(pnt1,pnt2);
 System.out.println("X: " + pnt1.x + " Y:" + pnt1.y);

     System.out.println("X: " + pnt2.x + " Y: " +pnt2.y); }

If we execute this main() method, we see the following output:

X: 0 Y: 0 X: 0 Y: 0 X: 100 Y: 100 X: 0 Y: 0

The method successfully alters the value ofpnt1, even though it is passed by value; however, a swap of pnt1 and pnt2 fails! This is the major source of confusion. In themain() method, pnt1 and pnt2 are nothing more than object references. When you passpnt1 and pnt2 to the tricky() method, Java passes the references by value just like any other parameter. This means the references passed to the method are actually copies of the original references. Figure 1 below shows two references pointing to the same object after Java passes an object to a method.

Java copies and passes the reference by value, not the object. Thus, method manipulation will alter the objects, since the references point to the original objects. But since the references are copies, swaps will fail. As Figure 2 illustrates, the method references swap, but not the original references. Unfortunately, after a method call, you are left with only the unswapped original references. For a swap to succeed outside of the method call, we need to swap the original references, not the copies.

5

The bottom line on pass-by-value: the called method can't change the caller's variable, although for object reference variables, the called method can change the object the variable referred to. What's the difference between changing the variable and changing the object? For object references, it means the called method can't reassign the caller's original reference variable and make it refer to a different object, or null.

I took this code and explanation from a book on Java Certification and made some minor changes.
I think it's a good illustration to the pass by value of an object. In the code below, reassigning g does not reassign f! At the end of the bar() method, two Foo objects have been created, one referenced by the local variable f and one referenced by the local (argument) variable g.

Because the doStuff() method has a copy of the reference variable, it has a way to get to the original Foo object, for instance to call the setName() method. But, the doStuff() method does not have a way to get to the f reference variable. So doStuff() can change values within the object f refers to, but doStuff() can't change the actual contents (bit pattern) of f. In other words, doStuff() can change the state of the object that f refers to, but it can't make f refer to a different object!

package test.abc;

public class TestObject {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        bar();
    }

    static void bar() {
        Foo f = new Foo();
        System.out.println("Object reference for f: " + f);
        f.setName("James");
        doStuff(f);
        System.out.println(f.getName());
        //Can change the state of an object variable in f, but can't change the object reference for f.
        //You still have 2 foo objects.
        System.out.println("Object reference for f: " + f);
        }

    static void doStuff(Foo g) {
            g.setName("Boo");
            g = new Foo();
            System.out.println("Object reference for g: " + g);
        }
}


package test.abc;

public class Foo {
    public String name = "";

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

}

Note that the object reference has not changed in the console output below:

Console output:

Object reference for f: test.abc.Foo@62f72617

Object reference for g: test.abc.Foo@4fe5e2c3

Boo Object reference for f: test.abc.Foo@62f72617

5

Java passes references to objects by value.

So if any modification is done to the Object to which the reference argument points it will be reflected back on the original object.

But if the reference argument point to another Object still the original reference will point to original Object.

5

Java passes everything by value!!

//create an object by passing in a name and age:

PersonClass variable1 = new PersonClass("Mary", 32);

PersonClass variable2;

//Both variable2 and variable1 now reference the same object

variable2 = variable1; 


PersonClass variable3 = new PersonClass("Andre", 45);

// variable1 now points to variable3

variable1 = variable3;

//WHAT IS OUTPUT BY THIS?

System.out.println(variable2);
System.out.println(variable1);

Mary 32
Andre 45

if you could understand this example we r done. otherwise, please visit this webPage for detailed explanation:

webPage

1
  • This actually doesn't explain anything in regards to potential by ref/by val property of Java.
    – Mox
    Jan 18, 2017 at 11:38
5

It seems everything is call by value in java as i have tried to understand by the following program

Class-S

class S{
String name="alam";
public void setName(String n){
this.name=n; 
}}

Class-Sample

    public class Sample{
    public static void main(String args[]){
    S s=new S();
    S t=new S();
    System.out.println(s.name);
    System.out.println(t.name);
    t.setName("taleev");
    System.out.println(t.name);
    System.out.println(s.name);
    s.setName("Harry");
    System.out.println(t.name);
    System.out.println(s.name);
    }}

Output

alam

alam

taleev

alam

taleev

harry

As we have define class S with instance variable name with value taleev so for all the objects that we initialize from it will have the name variable with value of taleev but if we change the name's value of any objects then it is changing the name of only that copy of the class(Object) not for every class so after that also when we do System.out.println(s.name) it is printing taleev only we can not change the name's value that we have defined originally, and the value that we are changing is the object's value not the instance variable value so once we have define instance variable we are unable to change it

So i think that is how it shows that java deals with values only not with the references

The memory allocation for the primitive variables can be understood by this

5

First let's understand Memory allocation in Java: Stack and Heap are part of Memory that JVM allocates for different purposes. The stack memory is pre-allocated to thread, when it is created, therefore, a thread cannot access the Stack of other thread. But Heap is available to all threads in a program.

For a thread, Stack stores all local data, metadata of program, primitive type data and object reference. And, Heap is responsible for storage of actual object.

Book book = new Book("Effective Java");

In the above example, the reference variable is "book" which is stored in stack. The instance created by new operator -> new Book("Effective Java") is stored in Heap. The ref variable "book" has address of the object allocated in Heap. Let's say the address is 1001.

enter image description here

Consider passing a primitive data type i.e. int, float, double etc.

public class PrimitiveTypeExample { 
    public static void main(string[] args) {
       int num = 10;
       System.out.println("Value before calling method: " + num);
       printNum(num);
       System.out.println("Value after calling method: " + num);
    }
    public static void printNum(int num){
       num = num + 10;
       System.out.println("Value inside printNum method: " + num);
    }
}

Output is: Value before calling method: 10 Value inside printNum method: 20 Value after calling method: 10

int num =10; -> this allocates the memory for "int" in Stack of the running thread, because, it is a primitive type. Now when printNum(..) is called, a private stack is created within the same thread. When "num" is passed to this method, a copy of "num" is created in the method stack frame. num = num+10; -> this adds 10 and modifies the the int variable within the method stack frame. Therefore, the original num outside the method stack frame remains unchanged.

Consider, the example of passing the object of a custom class as an argument.

enter image description here

In the above example, ref variable "book" resides in stack of thread executing the program, and the object of class Book is created in Heap space when program executes new Book(). This memory location in Heap is referred by "book". When "book" is passed as method argument, a copy of "book" is created in private stack frame of method within the same stack of thread. Therefore, the copied reference variable points to the same object of class "Book" in the Heap.

enter image description here

The reference variable within method stack frame sets a new value to same object. Therefore, it is reflected when original ref variable "book" gets its value. Note that in case of passing reference variable, if it is initialized again in called method, it then points to new memory location and any operation does not affect the previous object in the Heap.

Therefore, when anything is passed as method argument, it is always the Stack entity - either primitive or reference variable. We never pass something that is stored in Heap. Hence, in Java, we always pass the value in the stack, and it is pass by value.

5

For simplicity and verbosity Its pass reference by value:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Dog aDog = new Dog("Max");
    Dog oldDog = aDog;

    // we pass the object to foo
    foo(aDog);
    // aDog variable is still pointing to the "Max" dog when foo(...) returns
    aDog.getName().equals("Max"); // true
    aDog.getName().equals("Fifi"); // false
    aDog == oldDog; // true
}

public static void foo(Dog d) {
    d.getName().equals("Max"); // true
    // change d inside of foo() to point to a new Dog instance "Fifi"
    d = new Dog("Fifi");
    d.getName().equals("Fifi"); // true
}
1
  • Sure, the confusion comes from the fact, that outside the Java community there is other semantics and verbose "Java is not God" Dec 6, 2021 at 18:59
4

Java passes parameters by value, There is no option of passing a reference in Java.

But at the complier binding level layer, It uses reference internally not exposed to the user.

It is essential as it saves a lot of memory and improves speed.

1
  • Every time you pas an object, it is passed by reference, cause that is what you find on the stack: a Reference Dec 6, 2021 at 19:01
4
public class Test {

    static class Dog {
        String name;

        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            result = prime * result + ((name == null) ? 0 : name.hashCode());
            return result;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                return false;
            Dog other = (Dog) obj;
            if (name == null) {
                if (other.name != null)
                    return false;
            } else if (!name.equals(other.name))
                return false;
            return true;
        }

        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }

        public void setName(String nb) {
            this.name = nb;
        }

        Dog(String sd) {
            this.name = sd;
        }
    }
    /**
     * 
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Dog aDog = new Dog("Max");

        // we pass the object to foo
        foo(aDog);
        Dog oldDog = aDog;

        System.out.println(" 1: " + aDog.getName().equals("Max")); // false
        System.out.println(" 2 " + aDog.getName().equals("huahua")); // false
        System.out.println(" 3 " + aDog.getName().equals("moron")); // true
        System.out.println(" 4 " + " " + (aDog == oldDog)); // true

        // part2
        Dog aDog1 = new Dog("Max");

        foo(aDog1, 5);
        Dog oldDog1 = aDog;

        System.out.println(" 5 : " + aDog1.getName().equals("huahua")); // true
        System.out.println(" part2 : " + (aDog1 == oldDog1)); // false

        Dog oldDog2 = foo(aDog1, 5, 6);
        System.out.println(" 6 " + (aDog1 == oldDog2)); // true
        System.out.println(" 7 " + (aDog1 == oldDog)); // false
        System.out.println(" 8 " + (aDog == oldDog2)); // false
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @param d
     */
    public static void foo(Dog d) {
        System.out.println(d.getName().equals("Max")); // true

        d.setName("moron");

        d = new Dog("huahua");
        System.out.println(" -:-  " + d.getName().equals("huahua")); // true
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @param d
     * @param a
     */
    public static void foo(Dog d, int a) {
        d.getName().equals("Max"); // true

        d.setName("huahua");
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @param d
     * @param a
     * @param b
     * @return
     */
    public static Dog foo(Dog d, int a, int b) {
        d.getName().equals("Max"); // true
        d.setName("huahua");
        return d;
    }
}

The sample code to demonstrate the impact of changes to the object at different functions .

4

I'd say it in another way:

In java references are passed (but not objects) and these references are passed-by-value (the reference itself is copied and you have 2 references as a result and you have no control under the 1st reference in the method).

Just saying: pass-by-value might be not clear enough for beginners. For instance in Python the same situation but there are articles, which describe that they call it pass-by-reference, only cause references are used.

0
4

Here a more precise definition:

  • Pass/call by value: Formal parameter is like a local variable in scope of function, it evaluates to actual parameter at the moment of function call.
  • Pass/call by reference: Formal parameter is just a alias for the real value, any change of it in the scope of function can have side effects outside in any other part of code.

So in C/C++ you can create a function that swaps two values passed using the references:

void swap(int& a, int& b) 
{
    int tmp = a; 
    a = b; 
    b = tmp; 
}

You can see it has a unique reference to a and b, so we do not have a copy, tmp just hold unique references.

The same function in java does not have side effects, the parameter passing is just like the code above without references.

Although java work with pointers/references, the parameters are not unique pointers, in each attribution, they are copied instead just assigned like C/C++

3

I think this simple explanation might help you understand as I wanted to understand this same thing when I was struggling through this.

When you pass a primitive data to a function call it's content is being copied to the function's argument and when you pass an object it's reference is being copied to the function's argument. Speaking of object, you can't change the copied reference-the argument variable is referencing to in the calling function.

Consider this simple example, String is an object in java and when you change the content of a string the reference variable will now point to some new reference as String objects are immutable in java.

String name="Mehrose";  // name referencing to 100

ChangeContenet(String name){
 name="Michael"; // refernce has changed to 1001

} 
System.out.print(name);  //displays Mehrose

Fairly simple because as I mentioned you are not allowed to change the copied reference in the calling function. But the problem is with the array when you pass an array of String/Object. Let us see.

String names[]={"Mehrose","Michael"};

changeContent(String[] names){
  names[0]="Rose";
  names[1]="Janet"

}

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(names)); //displays [Rose,Janet]

As we said that we can't change the copied reference in the function call and we also have seen in the case of a single String object. The reason is names[] variable referencing to let's say 200 and names[0] referencing to 205 and so on. You see we didn't change the names[] reference it still points to the old same reference still after the function call but now names[0] and names[1] reference has been changed. We Still stand on our definition that we can't change the reference variable's reference so we didn't.

The same thing happens when you pass a Student object to a method and you are still able to change the Student name or other attributes, the point is we are not changing the actual Student object rather we are changing the contents of it

You can't do this

Student student1= new Student("Mehrose");

changeContent(Student Obj){
 obj= new Student("Michael") //invalid
 obj.setName("Michael")  //valid

}
3

Java uses pass-by-value, but the effects differ whether you are using primitive or a reference type.

When you pass a primitive type as an argument to a method, it's getting a copy of the primitive and any changes inside the block of the method won't change the original variable.

When you pass a reference type as an argument to a method, it's still getting a copy but it's a copy of the reference to the object (in other words, you are getting a copy of the memory address in the heap where the object is located), so any changes in the object inside the block of the method will affect the original object outside the block.

2

The Java programming language passes arguments only by value, that is, you cannot change the argument value in the calling method from within the called method.


However, when an object instance is passed as an argument to a method, the value of the argument is not the object itself but a reference to the object. You can change the contents of the object in the called method but not the object reference.


To many people, this looks like pass-by-reference, and behaviorally, it has much in common with pass-by-reference. However, there are two reasons this is inaccurate.

  • Firstly, the ability to change the thing passed into a method only applies to objects, not primitive values.

  • Second, the actual value associated with a variable of object type is the reference to the object, and not the object itself. This is an important distinction in other ways, and if clearly understood, is entirely supporting of the point that the Java programming language passes arguments by value.


The following code example illustrates this point:
1 public class PassTest {
2
3   // Methods to change the current values
4   public static void changeInt(int value) {
5     value = 55;
6  }
7   public static void changeObjectRef(MyDate ref) {
8     ref = new MyDate(1, 1, 2000);
9  }
10   public static void changeObjectAttr(MyDate ref) {
11     ref.setDay(4);
12   }
13
14 public static void main(String args[]) {
15     MyDate date;
16     int val;
17
18     // Assign the int
19     val = 11;
20     // Try to change it
21     changeInt(val);
22     // What is the current value?
23     System.out.println("Int value is: " + val);
24
25 // Assign the date
26     date = new MyDate(22, 7, 1964);
27     // Try to change it
28     changeObjectRef(date);
29     // What is the current value?
30 System.out.println("MyDate: " + date);
31
32 // Now change the day attribute
33     // through the object reference
34     changeObjectAttr(date);
35     // What is the current value?
36 System.out.println("MyDate: " + date);
37   }
38 }

This code outputs the following:
java PassTest
Int value is: 11
MyDate: 22-7-1964
MyDate: 4-7-1964
The MyDate object is not changed by the changeObjectRef method;
however, the changeObjectAttr method changes the day attribute of the
MyDate object.
1
  • This is very misleading. You certainly can change the value of an argument from within a method.
    – Gray
    Nov 28, 2017 at 20:33
1
+150

There are only two versions:

  • You can pass the value i.e. (4,5)
  • You can pass an address i.e. 0xF43A

Java passes primivates as values and objects as addresses. Those who say, "address are values too", do not make a distinction between the two. Those who focus on the effect of the swap functions focus on what happens after the passing is done.

In C++ you can do the following:

Point p = Point(4,5);

This reserves 8 bytes on the stack and stores (4,5) in it.

Point *x = &p;

This reserves 4 bytes on the stack and stores 0xF43A in it.

Point &y = p;

This reserves 4 bytes on the stack and stores 0xF43A in it.

  1. I think everyone will agree that a call to f(p) is a pass-by-value if the definition of f is f(Point p). In this case an additional 8 bytes being reserved and (4,5) being copied into it. When f changes p the the the original is guarantieed to be unchanged when f returns.

  2. I think that everyone will agree that a call to f(p) is a pass-by-reference if the definition of f is f(Point &p). In this case an additional 4 bytes being reserved and 0xF43A being copied into it. When f changes p the the original is guarantieed to be changed when f returns.

  3. A call to f(&p) is also pass-by-reference if the definition of f is f(Point *p). In this case an additional 4 bytes being reserved and 0xF43A being copied into it. When f changes *p the the original is guarantieed to be changed when f returns.

  4. A call to f(x) is also pass-by-reference if the definition of f is f(Point *p). In this case an additional 4 bytes being reserved and 0xF43A being copied into it. When f changes *p the the original is guarantieed to be changed when f returns.

  5. A call to f(y) is also pass-by-reference if the definition of f is f(Point &p). In this case an additional 4 bytes being reserved and 0xF43A being copied into it. When f changes p the the original is guarantieed to be changed when f returns.

Sure what happens after the passing is done differs, but that is only a language construct. In the case of pointer you have to use -> to access the members and in the case of references you have to use .. If you want to swap the values of the original then you can do tmp=a; a=b; b=tmp; in the case of references and tmp=*a; *b=tmp; *a=tmp for pointers. And in Java you would have do: tmp.set(a); a.set(b); b.set(tmp). Focussing on the assignment statement statement is silly. You can do the exact same thing in Java if you write a little bit of code.

So Java passes primivates by values and objects by references. And Java copy values to achieve that, but so does C++.

For completeness:

Point p = new Point(4,5);

This reserves 4 bytes on the stack and stores 0xF43A in it and reserves 8 bytes on the heap and stores (4,5) in it.

If you want to swap the memory locations like so

void swap(int& a, int& b) {
    int *tmp = &a;
    &a = &b;
    &b = tmp;
}

Then you will find that you run into the limitations of your hardware.

2
  • One of the most complete answers is bumped to the bottom. Your #3 describes the situation in Java the best.
    – v010dya
    Apr 21, 2021 at 13:51
  • Not relevant for the semantics: Guess, all Java implementations use two levels of indirection, i.e. a reference is a kind of handle, not yet the object address, which may change by garbage collection. Dec 10, 2021 at 12:53
1

Guess, the common canon is wrong based on inaccurate language

Authors of a programming language do not have the authority to rename established programming concept.

Primitive Java types byte, char, short, int, long float, double are definitely passed by value.

All other types are Objects: Object members and parameters technically are references.

So these "references" are passed "by value", but there occurs no object construction on the stack. Any change of object members (or elements in case of an array) apply to the same original Object; such reference precisely meets the logic of pointer of an instance passed to some function in any C-dialect, where we used to call this passing an object by reference

Especially we do have this thing java.lang.NullPointerException, which makes no sense in a pure by-value-concept

8
  • 4
    It's still pass-by-value even if the value itself is a reference. The argument is copied and reassigning it doesn't affect anything outside the called function - this is the key difference between pass-by-value/reference.
    – Michael
    Sep 21, 2021 at 4:50
  • 1
    This seems like the correct answer to me. Why are people so caught up on the technicalities of pass-by-object-reference versus pass-by-reference? If you pass a non-primitive variable to a function, modifications to that variable within the function affect the variable outside of the function. That is pretty much the same behavior as pass-by-reference. "It's still pass-by-value even if the value itself is a reference" - umm, okay, but if the value is a reference then you are passing a reference. Terminology aside, passing objects as arguments can affect the object outside of the function.
    – h0r53
    Oct 19, 2021 at 16:09
  • 2
    @h0r53 Why are people so caught up? Consistent definitions are import for effective communication. What C does, IS ALSO PASS BY VALUE. It's just the java calls its pointers "References". And that's where the confusion comes from. It's a different use of the word reference than in "pass-by-reference". Under the hood a "reference" in java is just a pointer, meaning it's a primitive which holds an address to the object in memory. Yes, you change the object in memory, but not the reference itself. So if you assign a different object or set it to null, the reference outside the function wont change
    – Sanjeev
    Feb 19 at 17:08
  • 1
    @h0r53, I can see from your posts (which are great, btw) that you know C and C++. C does not offer Pass by Reference, but C++ actually does by way of allowing "reference parameters". When you declare a function with a header like , void foo(TreeClass& maple), the ampersand makes this a reference parameter (can't do that in C). Now, if you set maple to null inside the function, the change will also be reflected outside the method. Please see my post for details stackoverflow.com/questions/40480/…
    – Sanjeev
    Feb 19 at 17:24
  • 1
    @Sanjeev I see your point and the subtle differences in reference v. object-reference are more clear to me. I was admittedly a bit frustrated when writing the prior response because it seemed like the issue was being unnecessarily convoluted with terminology. I just wanted a quick answer - "If I pass an object to a function, and change that object within the function, is it reflected in the caller?" My background causes me to think of everything in terms of pointers, so when I think of pass-by-reference or pass-by-object-reference, I think of pass-by-pointer, which isn't technically correct.
    – h0r53
    Feb 22 at 16:13
0

If you want it to put into a single sentence to understand and remember easily, simplest answer:

Java is always pass the value with a new reference

(So you can modify the original object but can not access the original reference)

1
  • The object can be modified because it is passed by it's reference ;) Dec 6, 2021 at 19:08
0

Every single answer here is tying to take pass pointer by reference from other languages and show how it is impossible to do in Java. For whatever reason nobody is attempting to show how to implement pass-object-by-value from other languages.

This code shows how something like this can be done:

public class Test
{
    private static void needValue(SomeObject so) throws CloneNotSupportedException
    {
        SomeObject internalObject = so.clone();
        so=null;
        
        // now we can edit internalObject safely.
        internalObject.set(999);
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        SomeObject o = new SomeObject(5);
        System.out.println(o);
        try
        {
            needValue(o);
        }
        catch(CloneNotSupportedException e)
        {
            System.out.println("Apparently we cannot clone this");
        }
        System.out.println(o);
    }
}

public class SomeObject implements Cloneable
{
    private int val;
    public SomeObject(int val)
    {
        this.val = val;
    }
    public void set(int val)
    {
        this.val = val;
    }
    public SomeObject clone()
    {
        return new SomeObject(val);
    }
    public String toString()
    {
        return Integer.toString(val);
    }
}

Here we have a function needValue and what it does is right away create a clone of the object, which needs be implemented in the class of the object itself and the class needs to be marked as Cloneable. It is not essential to set so to null after that, but i have done so here to show that we are not going to be using that reference after that.

It may well be that Java does not have pass-by-reference semantics, but to call the language "pass-by-value" is along the lines of wishful thinking.

2
  • 3
    Note: The safely in "now we can edit internalObject safely" depends on the implementation of the clone() method (i.e. "deep" or "shallow") and how far down the object tree your edits have an impact. For this simple example it is correct though.
    – siegi
    Apr 24, 2021 at 4:59
  • 1
    Guess, you are the first human being, who ever managed to "pass an object by value" in Java, tend to call you the "Neil Armstrong of Java", henceforth ;) Jan 5 at 8:53
0

"I am a Junior Java Developer and I would like to know if Java uses Call-by-Value or Call-by-Reference?"

There is no universal answer to that and there cannot be for it's a false dichotomy. We have 2 different terms (Call-by-Value/Call-by-Reference) but at least 3(!) different ways of handling said data when passing it to a method:

  1. Our data is copied and the copy fed to a method. Changes to the copy do not propagate outside.(Think an int in Java or C++ or C#.)
  2. A pointer (the memory address) of our data is fed to the method instead. Changes to our data do propagate outside. We can also point to some new instance, leaving our original data dangling. (Think pointers in C++.)
  3. Like #2, except we can only change the original data but not what our pointer is pointing too. (Think instances passed as parameters in Java.)

It's uncontentious in the OO world that #1 is Call-by-Value and #2 is Call-by-Reference. However, since we have only two terms for three options, there is no clear delineation between the two terms, thanks to option #3.

"What does that mean for me?"

It means that within the Java sphere you may reasonably assume #3 to be assumed under Call-by-Value (or the more verbal gymnastics term, Call-References-by-Value).

However, in the wider OO world, it means you have to ask for an explicit delineation between Call-by-Value and Call-by-Reference, specifically how the other party classifies #3.

"But I read that the JLS defines it as Call-by-Value!"

Which is why your initial assumption when dealing with Java developers should be the above. The JLS has much less authority outside of Java, however.

"Why would Java developers insist on their own terminology?"

It's not for me to speculate but I think it's fair to point out that there is some potential problems with #2 (what is clearly Call-by-Reference), as hinted at, leading to Call-by-Reference not having the best of reputation everywhere.

"Is there a solution to this mess?"

3 options, only 2 ubiquitous names. The obvious exit is a 3rd term that gains equal wide-spread use as Call-by-Value and Call-by-Reference (and which is less confusing than Call-References-by-Value, perhaps Call-by-Sharing). Until then you need to presume or ask, as outlined above.

Ultimately, it does not matter what we call it, for as long as we understand each other and there is no confusion.

12
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Jan 20 at 19:54
  • Option 3: You think of a reference to a replicated object? Think the mess is, that many responses refuse to consider objects, at all and that modes of passing entities were used long before Java. Jan 21 at 18:55
  • With #3, I am thinking of what Java is doing. In Java, when your method gets passed an instance Foo foo and you assign foo = new FancyFooSubclass();, these changes do not propagate outside. After your method returns, foo still points to the original Foo object. This is not necessarily the case with, say, C++ pointers passed to a method. Which is why the original question poses a false dichotomy. And answers with hundreds of upvotes (!) do not clear up that misunderstanding, exacerbating the confusing state of things for Junior Developers. Jan 22 at 11:46
  • Assigning parameter reference in Java is same semantic as assigning a parameter pointer in C (excluding C++-pointer reference, "T*&" for some type T). Certainly agree with you, majority not necessarily meets reason. Dichotomy exists after grammar. Under the question is a comment with reasonable link, getting the things straight -> baeldung.com/java-pass-by-value-or-pass-by-reference For further entertainment you can follow my last response to the thread :) Jan 22 at 17:37
  • 1
    Personally, I don't have a skin in the game. I have a weak preference for calling passing value types as CbV and reference types as CbR. The interpretation of Java developers. otoh, is detached from the actual words used in CbV and CbR. But ultimately which expressions we use is not as important as having enough expressions to express ourselves. Passing parameters certainly has more divergent properties than can be expressed in two terms: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/visual-basic/programming-guide/… Jan 24 at 13:09

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