3

Is it possible to use [...new Set()] to return an array of unique objects based on the inner id value? If this isn't possible, is there any other clever ES6 ways to achieve this output?

Reference: Unique Values in an Array

var arr = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10}
]

var arr2 = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10},
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 13}
]
mergedArray = arr.concat(arr2);

console.log(
  [...new Set(mergedArray)]
);

// output would be:
//  [
//    {email:'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10},
//    {email:'matthew@gmail.com', id: 13}
//  ]

3

To get the unique objects based on ID, you could create a Map instead of a Set, pass it a 2-element Array as iterator, and it will have unique keys, and then get it's values

var arr = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10}
]

var arr2 = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10},
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 13}
]

var mergedArray = arr.concat(arr2);
var map         = new Map(mergedArray.map(o => [o.id,o]));
var unique      = [...map.values()];

console.log(unique);

4
  • @adeneo this is a fine succinct solution, but it actually iterates thru the inputs twice as much as is necessary – once to create the map, and then once to expand into the output array. I only remark about this because you seemed to believe my code does "a lot of iteration" – Thank you Nov 8 '16 at 21:03
  • @naomik - I'm not used to functional programming, so it took me about ten times reading it before I got closed to understanding it. You're creating a map of the unique ID's from the first array, and then you're using that map to filter the second array, and then you join the arrays when the second array is filtered. And you're right, there's nothing really clever about it, it's just written in an unbelievably complicated way, at least for me who isn't used to reading code like that. And sure, the spread above iterates a second time, it's not a problem, spreads are fast in most engines. – adeneo Nov 8 '16 at 21:30
  • FYI, if the first array had multiple objects with the same ID, your answer wouldn't catch it, not that it's an issue, as the OP didn't post data like that anyway, just that it doesn't neccessarely return "unique objects based on the inner id" in all cases -> jsfiddle.net/6oy2z676 – adeneo Nov 8 '16 at 21:32
  • @adeneo it is by design that my procedure makes no assumption about the initial input. It is not a commutative procedure – unionBy (f) (x) (y) will return a different result than unionBy (f) (y) (x). If you need have potential duplicates in both (or more) of the inputs, unionByAll (f) ([], x, y) will give you the desired result. I will make a note in my answer tho. Thanks for calling it to my attention. – Thank you Nov 8 '16 at 23:04
1

Note: this is the fastest solution so far, see test case on jsperf.com.

I think the best solution would be to create a map object with ids as keys, and array elements as values. Since it's not possible to have two different elements with the same key in an object, duplicate elements would be automatically removed. You could then convert the map object back to array using the Object.values() function (note that this is a part of ES 2017, not ES 6).

const arr = [
  { email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10 },
];

const arr2 = [
  { email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10 },
  { email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 13 },
];
const mergedArray = [...arr, ...arr2];

const map = {};
for (const element of mergedArray) {
  map[element.id] = element;
}
const newArray = Object.values(map);
console.log(newArray);

Also, instead of doing arr.concat(arr2) you can use the spread operator: [...arr, ...arr2]. IMO it's more readable.

1

Since this is tagged with functional programming I'm going to offer a more functional approach that uses generic procedures

My implementation of unionBy uses an underlying Set but this implementation detail is not leaked to the functions that use it. Instead, the filtering predicate control is inverted by being passed to your "unioning" procedure as a higher-order function. This is important because the user of your function should not care that a Set is being used. Perhaps the Set is most ideal, but in other situations it might not be. Either way, it's best if the user of the unionBy procedure declares what the grouping value is, not anything else.

To see what I mean, let's first look at unionById – it accepts two arrays of Object type, and returns an array of Object type.

// unionById :: [Object] -> [Object] -> [Object]
const unionById = unionBy (p=> x=> p (x.id));

Here, the first argument to unionBy is a user-defined procedure, but the first parameter of your procedure will itself expect another procedure, p in this case. The second parameter of your procedure, x in this case, will be the individual elements being examined. You simply pass whatever the "grouping" value is back to p. Since we want to group by each x's id field, we simply call p(x.id)


Here's a runnable code snippet

// id :: a -> a
const id = x=> x

// unionBy :: ((a -> b) -> a -> b) -> [c] -> [c] -> [c] 
const unionBy = p=> xs=> ys=> {
  let s = new Set (xs.map (p (id)));
  let zs = ys.filter (p (z => s.has (z) ? false : s.add (z)));
  return xs.concat (zs);
};

// unionById :: [Object] -> [Object] -> [Object]
const unionById = unionBy (p=> x=> p (x.id));

// your data
var arr = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10}
]

var arr2 = [
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 10},
  {email: 'matthew@gmail.com', id: 13}
]

// check it out
console.log(unionById(arr)(arr2))


This might be most clear if you look at the very generic union

// apply :: (a -> b) -> a -> b
const apply = f=> x=> f(x)

// union :: [a] -> [a] -> [a]
const union = unionBy (apply);

union ([1,2,3]) ([2,3,4]);
// => [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]

unionBy is powerful because it makes no assumptions about what the inputs will be. Before we were using it on an array of Objects – Here you'll see it working on an array of Strings.

let xs = ['A', 'B', 'C'];
let ys = ['a', 'b', 'x', 'y'];
unionBy (p=> x=> p(x.toLowerCase())) (xs) (ys);
// => [ 'A', 'B', 'C', 'x', 'y']

You'll probably want unionByAll which accepts 2 or more input arrays

// uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> (a,b) -> c  
const uncurry = f=> (x,y)=> f (x) (y);

// unionByAll :: ((a -> b) -> a -> b) -> [[c]] -> [c]
const unionByAll = p=> (x,...xs)=> {
  return xs.reduce (uncurry (unionBy (p)), x);
};

unionByAll (apply) ([1,2,3], [2,3,4], [3,4,5]);
// => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]

Care: @adeneo points out that unionBy makes no assumption about the initial input. It is by design that unionBy does not check for duplicates in the initial input – it is not a commutative procedure.

// "duplicates" in xs will not be removed
unionBy (f) (xs) (ys)

// "duplicates" in ys will not be removed
unionBy (f) (ys) (xs)

If you have potential duplicates in one or more of your inputs, utilizing unionByAll will help you

// "duplicates" in both xs and ys will now be removed
unionByAll (f) ([], xs, ys)
13
  • 1
    Could you add some explanation? I find it hard to understand. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 8 '16 at 20:30
  • 1
    It seems like this solution is the slowest of all the answers here, and it's over 10 times slower than my solution (at least in Chrome). See test case on jsperf.com. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 8 '16 at 20:45
  • 1
    @adaneo, strange, I find almost nothing clever about it. It iterates through each input array once – or in other words, each value from each array is only touched a single time. – Thank you Nov 8 '16 at 20:52
  • 1
    @Gothdo the performance doesn't concern me at all. If something takes 1 thousandth of a millisecond and another takes 1 hundredth of a millisecond, I just don't care. If this is called in a tight loop and getting repeated millions of times where it might start to make a difference, then sure, it could benefit from a refactor. – Thank you Nov 8 '16 at 21:00
  • 1
    @naomik It kind of bother me that the predicate have to be applied to both arrays. I guess that's the only way to implement groupBy. The generalization comes at a price. Anyway very nice solution: +1. – user6445533 Nov 8 '16 at 22:04
0

Here would be my approach, not to use Set but a Map:

const uniques = mergedArray
  .reduce((map, item) => map.set(item.id, item), new Map())
  .values();

This gives you an iterable, which may or may not work for what you need.

4
  • Map.prototype.values() returns an iterator, not an array. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 8 '16 at 20:29
  • Yep, I pointed that out. I wouldn't convert to an Array unless it was required. – Jacob Nov 8 '16 at 20:31
  • 1
    The question asks specifically about arrays ("Is it possible to use [...new Set()] to return an array"). In most cases it's necessary to convert an iterator to an array, because otherwise you can't use array methods on it. – Michał Perłakowski Nov 8 '16 at 20:35
  • To convert an iterator to a JavaScript Array, you can use the spread operator: const uniquesArray = [...uniques]. Sometimes someone says "array" thinking that's the only option for a collection or using it in a generic sense, not meaning Array specifically. – Jacob Nov 9 '16 at 22:45

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