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I have two strings, I want to get difference between contents of two strings in SQL ??

for example,

Declare @String1 as varchar(100)='Please check requirement and let me know your feedback.';

Declare @String2 as varchar(100)='Please checkout requirement & let me know your feedback';

Result should be like the words which are not common in both the string.

e.g checkout , &

4
  • Reasoning from a single example is problematic. Do you have more examples of expected inputs and the results you're seeking? I.e. are you actually looking for the edit distance? Nov 9 '16 at 8:43
  • Ideally, don't just change from one example to a completely different one. I asked for multiple examples, and you've removed the example that answers have already been written around. Nov 9 '16 at 8:51
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever I though I am not clear about the question , that is why changed the example. I want to find out words that are not common in two string any help appreciated. Nov 9 '16 at 8:56
  • No clear. What do you want to see in the following use-cases: (1) string1 = 'Hello world' string2 = 'What a wonderful world' (2) string1 = 'stackoverflow.com' string2 = 'stackoverflow' Nov 9 '16 at 9:06
1

You can use REPLACE as the below:

SELECT REPLACE(CASE WHEN LEN(@String1) < LEN(@String2) THEN @String2 ELSE @String1 END, 
               CASE WHEN LEN(@String1) < LEN(@String2) THEN @String1 ELSE @String2 END, '')

Result: .com

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  • 1
    I think you should also do the opposite replacement, since @String1 can be the bigger string . +1 Though.
    – sagi
    Nov 9 '16 at 8:45
  • @sagi I thought so
    – NEER
    Nov 9 '16 at 8:46
1

This code will first split the strings into single words and then check for words which do not exist in the other string

Declare @String1 as varchar(100)='Please check requirement and let me know your feedback.';
Declare @String2 as varchar(100)='Please checkout requirement & let me know your feedback';

WITH s1_Splitted AS
(
    SELECT wrd.value('.','nvarchar(max)') AS Word
    FROM
    (SELECT (
            SELECT CAST('<x>' + REPLACE((SELECT @String1 AS [*] FOR XML PATH('')),' ','</x><x>') + '</x>' AS XML)
            ) AS Casted
    ) AS derived
    CROSS APPLY derived.Casted.nodes('/x') AS A(wrd)
)
,s2_Splitted AS
(
    SELECT wrd.value('.','nvarchar(max)') AS Word
    FROM
    (SELECT (
            SELECT CAST('<x>' + REPLACE((SELECT @String2 AS [*] FOR XML PATH('')),' ','</x><x>') + '</x>' AS XML)
            ) AS Casted
    ) AS derived
    CROSS APPLY derived.Casted.nodes('/x') AS A(wrd)
)
SELECT 'only in s1',s1.Word
FROM s1_Splitted AS s1
WHERE NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM s2_Splitted AS s2 WHERE s2.Word=s1.Word)
UNION ALL
SELECT 'only in s2',s2.Word
FROM s2_Splitted AS s2
WHERE NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM s1_Splitted AS s1 WHERE s1.Word=s2.Word)

The result (attention: the . after feedback is taken as two different words...)

only in s1  and
only in s1  check
only in s1  feedback.
only in s2  &
only in s2  checkout
only in s2  feedback
0

Assuming @String1 is a prefix of @String2

select right (@String2,len(@String2)-len(@String1))
;
8
  • This is not generic and will work only in the format posted in the question .
    – sagi
    Nov 9 '16 at 8:44
  • 1
    @Sagi, is there a general definition for the difference between 2 strings with a string result? what is the difference between 'stackoverflow' and 'overrated'? between 'apple' and 'banana'? Nov 9 '16 at 8:48
  • @DuduMarkovitz - as I suggested in the comments, one common metric is edit distance, but the OP hasn't really clarified yet what they mean, beyond a magical "I know what the difference is, make the computer know it too" Nov 9 '16 at 8:52
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever, therefore "with a string result". the OP was clear that the requested result,whatever it is, is a string. Nov 9 '16 at 8:54
  • No, but your query will only work for cases when the second string is the same as the first string with extras. The opposite won't work & If the extra is at the beginning it won't work. I'm not talking about difference between 'apple' and 'banana' . BTW - OP edited the question, both answer won't work.
    – sagi
    Nov 9 '16 at 8:55

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