12

I just wanted to concatenate multiple arrays in Ruby and couldn't find a satisfying way to do so.

Example input:

foo = [1, 2, 3]
bar = [4, 5, 6]
baz = [7, 8, 9]

Expected result: (without modifying the existing arrays)

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

My actual arrays are much larger, so I'm interested in an efficient solution. There may also be more than three arrays, so a short syntax is preferred.

What I have tried so far

  • foo + bar + baz is the obvious one, it's concise and clear. But it is evaluated as (foo + bar) + baz. In other words: it creates an intermediate array [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] that is thrown away after the whole operation. As noted in the documentation:

    repeated use of += on arrays can be quite inefficient

  • [*foo, *bar, *baz] basically inlines the elements which is not very efficient for large arrays, either. It also looks more like a hack to me.

  • [foo, bar, baz].flatten(1) seems to be even worse than the above, performance wise.

  • [].concat(foo).concat(bar).concat(baz) is the fastest, but it looks cumbersome and it needs multiple method invocations.

Shouldn't there be a simple class method for such a basic task? Something like:

Array.concat(foo, bar, baz)

Am I missing something obvious?

  • Have you tried flatten! - it doesn't create as many intermediary arrays as flatten so should have better performance. – ReggieB Nov 9 '16 at 15:35
  • @ReggieB it's only marginally faster. – Stefan Nov 9 '16 at 15:36
  • What do you mean by "basically inlines the elements which is not very efficient for large arrays"? – ndnenkov Nov 9 '16 at 15:37
  • Why [].concat(foo).concat(bar).concat(baz) and not foo.concat(bar).concat(baz)? – Ursus Nov 9 '16 at 15:40
  • 1
    The number of comments suggest the question isn't well defined. "satisfying" means different things to different people. Do you want CPU efficiency? Memory efficiency? Code efficiency? I'd say pick one of the criteria and go with it, or benchmark them a bunch and pick based on the best average time. I agree there should be a class method that is used to concat. We should be free to call it and always know it's the best because it has the criteria built-in to determine what to do. – the Tin Man Nov 9 '16 at 22:35
25

If you've already determined that multiple concatenation is the fastest method, you can write it nicer using reduce:

[foo, bar, baz].reduce([], :concat)
  • 1
    How about [foo, bar, baz].reduce(&:concat) – ReggieB Nov 9 '16 at 16:59
  • 2
    @ReggieB that would use foo as the initial "memo", thus modifying it. – Stefan Nov 9 '16 at 17:09
  • 2
    Any objections to [foo,bar,baz].flat_map(&:itself)? Seems to be essentially the same performance wise (occasionally faster) – engineersmnky Nov 9 '16 at 20:53
  • 4
    @engineersmnky it is effectively the same – flat_map calls concat if the argument is an array. I find .reduce([], :concat) easier to understand than .flat_map(&:itself). – Stefan Nov 10 '16 at 13:10
  • @engineersmnky it is effectively the same – flat_map calls concat if the argument is an array. I find .flat_map(&:itself) easier to understand than .reduce([], :concat). – Cary Swoveland Feb 19 '20 at 18:24
8

I've created another benchmark, comparing +, concat and a custom C extension with a variable number of arrays.

Result

  • the C extension was always fastest and roughly 2-3x faster than concat
  • plus is getting really slow if you concatenate many arrays

Conclusion

Although "2-3x" sounds like a huge improvement, it's just a few milliseconds in absolute terms. I was expecting a bigger difference by not having to resize the array, but this is apparently not a huge factor.

IMO, concat is a decent performer and I see no urgent need for a C extension.


My test arrays contain nil values. Other elements don't seem to produce different results (in relative terms).

I didn't include flat_map, because it is equivalent to concat.

Concatenating 3 arrays of size 100 (10000 times)
                 user     system      total        real
plus         0.020000   0.000000   0.020000 (  0.027927)
concat       0.020000   0.010000   0.030000 (  0.033204)
c_extension  0.010000   0.010000   0.020000 (  0.010727)

Concatenating 10 arrays of size 100 (10000 times)
                 user     system      total        real
plus         0.110000   0.070000   0.180000 (  0.180417)
concat       0.050000   0.020000   0.070000 (  0.065299)
c_extension  0.010000   0.010000   0.020000 (  0.025475)

Concatenating 10 arrays of size 1000 (10000 times)
                 user     system      total        real
plus         0.690000   0.560000   1.250000 (  1.252319)
concat       0.180000   0.130000   0.310000 (  0.303365)
c_extension  0.120000   0.120000   0.240000 (  0.248589)

plus is excluded from the following results

Concatenating 10 arrays of size 100000 (100 times)
                 user     system      total        real
concat       0.220000   0.340000   0.560000 (  0.568730)
c_extension  0.130000   0.150000   0.280000 (  0.281354)

Concatenating 100 arrays of size 10000 (100 times)
                 user     system      total        real
concat       0.210000   0.320000   0.530000 (  0.519030)
c_extension  0.160000   0.140000   0.300000 (  0.304751)

Concatenating 1000 arrays of size 1000 (100 times)
                 user     system      total        real
concat       0.240000   0.330000   0.570000 (  0.563511)
c_extension  0.150000   0.120000   0.270000 (  0.283546)

Concatenating 10000 arrays of size 100 (100 times)
                 user     system      total        real
concat       0.330000   0.310000   0.640000 (  0.643987)
c_extension  0.170000   0.120000   0.290000 (  0.286489)

Concatenating 100000 arrays of size 10 (100 times)
                 user     system      total        real
concat       1.300000   0.340000   1.640000 (  1.648687)
c_extension  0.310000   0.150000   0.460000 (  0.458214)

Test code:

require 'benchmark'

values = [
  # small
  { count: 3,      size: 100,    n: 10000 },
  { count: 10,     size: 100,    n: 10000 },
  { count: 10,     size: 1000,   n: 10000 },
  # large
  { count: 10,      size: 100000, n: 100 },
  { count: 100,     size: 10000,  n: 100 },
  { count: 1000,    size: 1000,   n: 100 },
  { count: 10000,   size: 100,    n: 100 },
  { count: 100000,  size: 10,     n: 100 }
]

values.each_with_index do |h, i|
  count, size, n = h.values_at(:count, :size, :n)
  arrays = Array.new(count) { Array.new(size) }

  puts
  puts "Concatenating #{count} arrays of size #{size} (#{n} times)"
  Benchmark.bm(10) do |r|
    r.report('plus')        { n.times { arrays.reduce(:+) } } if i < 3
    r.report('concat')      { n.times { arrays.reduce([], :concat) } }
    r.report('c_extension') { n.times { Array.concat(*arrays) } }
  end
end

C extension: (a patch actually, I've added this to Ruby's array.c)

VALUE
rb_ary_s_concat(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE klass)
{
  VALUE ary;
  long len = 0, i;
  for (i=0; i<argc; i++) {
    argv[i] = to_ary(argv[i]);
    len += RARRAY_LEN(argv[i]);
  }
  ary = rb_ary_new2(len);
  long beg = 0;
  for (i=0; i<argc; i++) {
    ary_memcpy(ary, beg, RARRAY_LEN(argv[i]), RARRAY_CONST_PTR(argv[i]));
    beg += RARRAY_LEN(argv[i]);
  }
  ARY_SET_LEN(ary, len);
  return ary;
}

You have to register this method in Init_Array via:

rb_define_singleton_method(rb_cArray, "concat", rb_ary_s_concat, -1);
  • Thnx for the patch, I suppose you need to recompile everything after that ? I'm on windows with the Ruby installer so I'll have to pass I guess – peter Nov 10 '16 at 13:28
  • @peter yes, you have to recompile Ruby to get it working. I couldn't find a way to write a simple extension because the implementation relies on functions and macros that are only available in array.c – Stefan Nov 10 '16 at 13:31
  • posted my question about MRI<>jRuby here stackoverflow.com/questions/40529208/… – peter Nov 10 '16 at 13:56
3

Did some benchmarks and simple + is the most efficient. So i would suggest to neglect the intermediate creation of an array.

You could add a new method concat_all to Array like this, but you would have to take into account mixed and multi-dimensional arrays also.

class Array
  def concat_all 
    self.reduce([], :+)
  end
end
[a, b, c].concat_all # a huge array
[a, b, c].concat_all.length #300000

Here my benchmarks

require 'Benchmark'
N = 1000

class Array
  def concat_all 
    self.reduce([], :+)
  end
  def concat_all2
    # just a quick test with fixed numbers for the fill method Stephan proposes but in Ruby itself
    d = Array.new(300_000)
    d[0..99999] = self[0]
    d[100_000..199999] = self[1]
    d[200_000..299999] = self[2]
    d
  end
  def concat_all3
    self.flatten
  end
end

# small arrays
a = (1..10).to_a
b = (11..20).to_a
c = (21..30).to_a

Benchmark.bm do |r|
  r.report('plus       ')  { N.times { a + b + c }}
  r.report('concat     ') { N.times { [].concat(a).concat(b).concat(c) }}
  r.report('push       ') { N.times { [].push(*a).push(*b).push(*c) }}
  r.report('<<         ') { N.times { ([] << a << b << c).flatten}}
  r.report('splash     ') { N.times {[*a, *b, *c]} }
  r.report('concat_all ')  { N.times { [a, b, c].concat_all }}
  r.report('concat_all3')  { N.times { [a, b, c].concat_all3 }}
  r.report('flat_map   ') { N.times {[a, b, c].flat_map(&:itself)} }
end

#large arrays
a = (1..100_000).to_a
b = (100_001..200_000).to_a
c = (200_001..300_000).to_a

Benchmark.bm do |r|
  r.report('plus       ')  { N.times { a + b + c }}
  r.report('concat     ') { N.times { [].concat(a).concat(b).concat(c) }}
  r.report('push       ') { N.times { [].push(*a).push(*b).push(*c) }}
  r.report('<<         ') { N.times { ([] << a << b << c).flatten}}
  r.report('splash     ') { N.times {[*a, *b, *c]} }
  r.report('concat_all ')  { N.times { [a, b, c].concat_all }}
  r.report('concat_all2')  { N.times { [a, b, c].concat_all2 }}
  r.report('concat_all3')  { N.times { [a, b, c].concat_all3 }}
  r.report('flat_map   ') { N.times {[a, b, c].flat_map(&:itself)} }
end

And here the results

# results for small arrays
       user     system      total        real
plus         0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000416)
concat       0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000592)
push         0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000441)
<<           0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.003387)
splash       0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.000789)
concat_all   0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001480)
concat_all3  0.016000   0.000000   0.016000 (  0.003496)
flat_map     0.000000   0.000000   0.000000 (  0.001036)

# results for big arrays
       user     system      total        real
plus         0.686000   0.671000   1.357000 (  1.351171)
concat       0.890000   0.733000   1.623000 (  1.630155)
push         1.466000   0.624000   2.090000 (  2.092684)
<<          23.837000   1.045000  24.882000 ( 24.885238)
splash       1.029000   1.264000   2.293000 (  2.332560)
concat_all   0.687000   0.967000   1.654000 (  1.709321)
concat_all2  0.936000   0.780000   1.716000 (  1.730428)
concat_all3 24.242000   0.998000  25.240000 ( 25.278264)
flat_map     0.780000   0.765000   1.545000 (  1.551654)
  • plus becomes slower as you add more arrays. – Stefan Nov 9 '16 at 17:46
  • The Array.concat class method I was thinking of would create a destination array with the correct size and then copy each array to the appropriate location within the destination array. This can probably only be achieved in C. – Stefan Nov 9 '16 at 17:48
  • 1
    Just tried it – a C implementation would be twice as fast as plus. Maybe I should file a feature request ... – Stefan Nov 9 '16 at 17:56
  • 1
    peter, could you add [a,b,c].flat_map(&:itself) to your benchmark? – Cary Swoveland Nov 9 '16 at 20:55
  • 1
    @CarySwoveland this seems to be more performant on a regular basis I posted it as a comment on the above (great minds and all that) but in that case the reduction posted in the other answer should also be added – engineersmnky Nov 9 '16 at 21:03

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