48

I'm trying to create an interface that could have

export interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  component?: any;
  click?: any;
  icon: string;
}
  1. Is there a way to require component or click to be set
  2. Is there a way to require that both properties can't be set?
44

Not with a single interface, since types have no conditional logic and can't depend on each other, but you can by splitting the interfaces:

export interface BaseMenuItem {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
}

export interface ComponentMenuItem extends BaseMenuItem {
  component: any;
}

export interface ClickMenuItem extends BaseMenuItem {
    click: any;
}

export type MenuItem = ComponentMenuItem | ClickMenuItem;
  • Interesting. I have never exported a "type" before. So it simply means MenuItem can be one or the other ? – Nix Nov 9 '16 at 15:38
  • I like this better than the one I did below. Link that helped me understand "type" stackoverflow.com/a/36783051/256793 – Nix Nov 9 '16 at 15:41
  • Yes: TS has AND and OR operators for its types. If you're doing something like this, the OR can be nice to give you a single collected name after declaring a bunch of individual types. – ssube Nov 9 '16 at 15:42
  • 2
    Hi guys, how do you force to choose between one of the interfaces, but not both? With that type, an object with both component and click wont make an error... – Daniel Ramos Nov 14 '17 at 9:57
  • 1
    @DanielRamos you can add click?: never on ComponentMenuItem and component?: never on ClickMenuItem. – ethan.roday May 2 '18 at 20:55
80

With the help of the Exclude type which was added in TypeScript 2.8, a generalizable way to require at least one of a set of properties is provided is:

type RequireAtLeastOne<T, Keys extends keyof T = keyof T> =
    Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>> 
    & {
        [K in Keys]-?: Required<Pick<T, K>> & Partial<Pick<T, Exclude<Keys, K>>>
    }[Keys]

And a partial but not absolute way to require that one and only one is provided is:

type RequireOnlyOne<T, Keys extends keyof T = keyof T> =
    Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>>
    & {
        [K in Keys]-?:
            Required<Pick<T, K>>
            & Partial<Record<Exclude<Keys, K>, undefined>>
    }[Keys]

Here is a TypeScript playground link showing both in action.

The caveat with RequireOnlyOne is that TypeScript doesn't always know at compile time every property that will exist at runtime. So obviously RequireOnlyOne can't do anything to prevent extra properties it doesn't know about. I provided an example of how RequireOnlyOne can miss things at the end of the playground link.

A quick overview of how it works using the following example:

interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  component?: number;
  click?: number;
  icon: string;
}

type ClickOrComponent = RequireAtLeastOne<MenuItem, 'click' | 'component'>
  1. Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>> from RequireAtLeastOne becomes { title: string, icon: string}, which are the unchanged properties of the keys not included in 'click' | 'component'

  2. { [K in Keys]-?: Required<Pick<T, K>> & Partial<Pick<T, Exclude<Keys, K>>> }[Keys] from RequireAtLeastOne becomes

    { 
        component: Required<{ component?: number }> & { click?: number }, 
        click: Required<{ click?: number }> & { component?: number } 
    }[Keys]
    

    Which becomes

    {
        component: { component: number, click?: number },
        click: { click: number, component?: number }
    }['component' | 'click']
    

    Which finally becomes

    {component: number, click?: number} | {click: number, component?: number}
    
  3. The intersection of steps 1 and 2 above

    { title: string, icon: string} 
    & 
    ({component: number, click?: number} | {click: number, component?: number})
    

    simplifies to

    { title: string, icon: string, component: number, click?: number} 
    | { title: string, icon: string, click: number, component?: number}
    
  • 3
    Thank you very much for descriptive examples. Really informative. – Eduard Jul 24 '18 at 18:47
  • 1
    Thanks for an extremely informative and well formed response. I've been playing with this example so I can better understand it. It appears that if you give component and click a type other then any an object with both at least one set of valid properties will pass. I assume that is because of the way the type reduces to { title: string, icon: string, component: any} | { title: string, icon: string, click: any} Which states the type is 3 properties instead of 4 with one being optional. I'm trying to find documentation on the use of the array in the map notation but can't. – Sam R Jan 28 at 19:51
  • This. is. pure. genius. You should definitely submit them here github.com/sindresorhus/type-fest – maxime1992 Mar 27 at 10:14
  • These work for Typescript 3.3 as well ! – guy777 Apr 8 at 12:04
  • 1
    Can anyone explain what the hyphen (minus sign) in the expression [K in keys]- does? – Lopsided Oct 16 at 1:30
10

An alternative without multiple interfaces is

export type MenuItem = {
  title: string;
  component: any;
  icon: string;
} | {
  title: string;
  click: any;
  icon: string;
};

const item: MenuItem[] = [
  { title: "", icon: "", component: {} },
  { title: "", icon: "", click: "" },
  // Shouldn't this error out because it's passing a property that is not defined
  { title: "", icon: "", click: "", component: {} },
  // Does error out :)
  { title: "", icon: "" }
];

I've asked a similar question at How to create a Partial-like that requires a single property to be set

The above could be simplified, but it may or may not be easier to read

export type MenuItem = {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
} & (
 {component: any} | {click: string}
)

Note that none of these prevent you from adding both because TypeScript does allow extra properties on objects that use AND/OR See https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/15447

  • 1
    You could use & to and extract title and icon to a separate type. :) – Robert Koritnik Nov 30 '18 at 9:27
2

I like using Pick along with a base type that includes all properties to establish these kinds of conditional requirements.

interface MenuItemProps {
  title: string;
  component: any;
  click: any;
  icon: string;
}

export interface MenuItem =
  Pick<MenuItemProps, "title" | "icon" | "component"> |
  Pick<MenuItemProps, "title" | "icon" | "click">

This is clean and also flexible. You can get arbitrarily complex with your requirements, asserting things like "require either all the properties, just these two properties, or just this one property" and so on while keeping your declaration simple and readable.

1

I ended up doing:

export interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
}

export interface MenuItemComponent extends MenuItem{
  component: any;
}

export interface MenuItemClick extends MenuItem{
  click: any;
}

Then I used:

 appMenuItems: Array<MenuItemComponent|MenuItemClick>;

But was hoping there was a way to model it with a single interface.

  • Actually Microsoft suggests it should be: <MenuItemComponent|MenuItemClick>[] – Loolooii Feb 27 at 14:56

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