137

I'm trying to create an interface that could have

export interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  component?: any;
  click?: any;
  icon: string;
}
  1. Is there a way to require component or click to be set
  2. Is there a way to require that both properties can't be set?
1

11 Answers 11

191

With the help of the Exclude type which was added in TypeScript 2.8, a generalizable way to require at least one of a set of properties is provided is:

type RequireAtLeastOne<T, Keys extends keyof T = keyof T> =
    Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>> 
    & {
        [K in Keys]-?: Required<Pick<T, K>> & Partial<Pick<T, Exclude<Keys, K>>>
    }[Keys]

And a partial but not absolute way to require that one and only one is provided is:

type RequireOnlyOne<T, Keys extends keyof T = keyof T> =
    Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>>
    & {
        [K in Keys]-?:
            Required<Pick<T, K>>
            & Partial<Record<Exclude<Keys, K>, undefined>>
    }[Keys]

Here is a TypeScript playground link showing both in action.

The caveat with RequireOnlyOne is that TypeScript doesn't always know at compile time every property that will exist at runtime. So obviously RequireOnlyOne can't do anything to prevent extra properties it doesn't know about. I provided an example of how RequireOnlyOne can miss things at the end of the playground link.

A quick overview of how it works using the following example:

interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  component?: number;
  click?: number;
  icon: string;
}

type ClickOrComponent = RequireAtLeastOne<MenuItem, 'click' | 'component'>
  1. Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>> from RequireAtLeastOne becomes { title: string, icon: string}, which are the unchanged properties of the keys not included in 'click' | 'component'

  2. { [K in Keys]-?: Required<Pick<T, K>> & Partial<Pick<T, Exclude<Keys, K>>> }[Keys] from RequireAtLeastOne becomes

    { 
        component: Required<{ component?: number }> & { click?: number }, 
        click: Required<{ click?: number }> & { component?: number } 
    }[Keys]
    

    Which becomes

    {
        component: { component: number, click?: number },
        click: { click: number, component?: number }
    }['component' | 'click']
    

    Which finally becomes

    {component: number, click?: number} | {click: number, component?: number}
    
  3. The intersection of steps 1 and 2 above

    { title: string, icon: string} 
    & 
    ({component: number, click?: number} | {click: number, component?: number})
    

    simplifies to

    { title: string, icon: string, component: number, click?: number} 
    | { title: string, icon: string, click: number, component?: number}
    
9
  • 6
    Thank you very much for descriptive examples. Really informative.
    – Eduard
    Jul 24 '18 at 18:47
  • 1
    Thanks for an extremely informative and well formed response. I've been playing with this example so I can better understand it. It appears that if you give component and click a type other then any an object with both at least one set of valid properties will pass. I assume that is because of the way the type reduces to { title: string, icon: string, component: any} | { title: string, icon: string, click: any} Which states the type is 3 properties instead of 4 with one being optional. I'm trying to find documentation on the use of the array in the map notation but can't.
    – Sam R
    Jan 28 '19 at 19:51
  • 5
    Can anyone explain what the hyphen (minus sign) in the expression [K in keys]- does? Oct 16 '19 at 1:30
  • 3
    @Lopsided It removes any optional modifiers that might have existed for K in the original object T. See stackoverflow.com/questions/49655419/… As for its purpose in [K in Keys]-?: specifically: I just did some testing and it looks like it actually doesn't make a difference in the final result, but I put it in just to be certain that RequireAtLeastOne behaves the same way regardless of whether the properties specified for Keys were originally optional or not.
    – KPD
    Oct 21 '19 at 17:49
  • 2
    Note: This is part of the official Microsoft Azure Typescript SDK docs.microsoft.com/en-us/javascript/api/@azure/… Jul 24 '20 at 18:28
130

Not with a single interface, since types have no conditional logic and can't depend on each other, but you can by splitting the interfaces:

export interface BaseMenuItem {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
}

export interface ComponentMenuItem extends BaseMenuItem {
  component: any;
}

export interface ClickMenuItem extends BaseMenuItem {
    click: any;
}

export type MenuItem = ComponentMenuItem | ClickMenuItem;
11
  • Interesting. I have never exported a "type" before. So it simply means MenuItem can be one or the other ?
    – Nix
    Nov 9 '16 at 15:38
  • I like this better than the one I did below. Link that helped me understand "type" stackoverflow.com/a/36783051/256793
    – Nix
    Nov 9 '16 at 15:41
  • 10
    Hi guys, how do you force to choose between one of the interfaces, but not both? With that type, an object with both component and click wont make an error... Nov 14 '17 at 9:57
  • 7
    @DanielRamos you can add click?: never on ComponentMenuItem and component?: never on ClickMenuItem. May 2 '18 at 20:55
  • 6
    Any way to make this compatible with parameter destructuring? I get TS errors if I try function myFunc({ title, icon, component, click }: MenuItem) Property 'component' does not exist on type 'MenuItem'. Property 'click' does not exist on type 'MenuItem'.
    – CletusW
    Nov 19 '20 at 23:57
56

There is a simpler solution. No need to rely on any or complex conditional types (see answer):

  1. Is there a way to require component or click to be set? (Inclusive OR)
type MenuItemOr = {
    title: string;
    icon: string;
} & ({ component: object } | { click: boolean }) 
// brackets are important here: "&" has precedence over "|"

let testOr: MenuItemOr;
testOr = { title: "t", icon: "i" } // error, none are set
testOr = { title: "t", icon: "i", component: {} } // ✔
testOr = { title: "t", icon: "i", click: true } // ✔
testOr = { title: "t", icon: "i", click: true, component: {} } // ✔

A union type (|) corresponds to inclusive OR. It is intersected with the non-conditional properties.

Use the in operator to narrow the value back to one of the constituents:

if ("click" in testOr) testOr.click // works 
  1. Is there a way to require that both properties can't be set? (Exclusive OR / XOR)
type MenuItemXor = {
    title: string;
    icon: string;
} & (
        | { component: object; click?: never }
        | { component?: never; click: boolean }
    )

let testXor: MenuItemXor;
testXor = { title: "t", icon: "i" } // error, none are set
testXor = { title: "t", icon: "i", component: {} } // ✔
testXor = { title: "t", icon: "i", click: true } // ✔
testXor = { title: "t", icon: "i", click: true, component: {} } //error,both set

Basically either component or click can be set, the other should never 1 be added at the same time. TS can make a discriminated union type out of MenuItemXor, which corresponds to XOR.

This XOR condition for MenuItemXor is not possible with accepted answer.


Playground

1 Technically, prop?: never gets resolved to prop?: undefined, though former is often used for illustration.

11
  • 6
    How to deal with testOr.click; that returns the error Property 'click' does not exist on type 'MenuItemOr'. ? May 20 '20 at 2:30
  • 4
    @EduardoDallmann you can use the in operator to check, if either properties exist on the object (Playground)
    – ford04
    May 20 '20 at 8:07
  • Nice answer! But can you explain how it works? I have a hard time understanding the union (|) with only a right operand. Thank you
    – NorTicUs
    Aug 4 '20 at 9:14
  • 1
    @NorTicUs If you mean the leading | inside & ( ... ) of MenuItemXor: this is just a shortcut for the union operator for better type formatting / separating over lines. Like here - no magic involved :)
    – ford04
    Aug 4 '20 at 9:22
  • 1
    It's slick but a slight loss in readability IMO compared to this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/61281828/2306481
    – Sheraff
    Oct 18 '20 at 7:25
15

An alternative without multiple interfaces is

export type MenuItem = {
  title: string;
  component: any;
  icon: string;
} | {
  title: string;
  click: any;
  icon: string;
};

const item: MenuItem[] = [
  { title: "", icon: "", component: {} },
  { title: "", icon: "", click: "" },
  // Shouldn't this error out because it's passing a property that is not defined
  { title: "", icon: "", click: "", component: {} },
  // Does error out :)
  { title: "", icon: "" }
];

I've asked a similar question at How to create a Partial-like that requires a single property to be set

The above could be simplified, but it may or may not be easier to read

export type MenuItem = {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
} & (
 {component: any} | {click: string}
)

Note that none of these prevent you from adding both because TypeScript does allow extra properties on objects that use AND/OR See https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/15447

1
  • 1
    You could use & to and extract title and icon to a separate type. :) Nov 30 '18 at 9:27
7

I ended up doing:

export interface MenuItem {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
}

export interface MenuItemComponent extends MenuItem{
  component: any;
}

export interface MenuItemClick extends MenuItem{
  click: any;
}

Then I used:

 appMenuItems: Array<MenuItemComponent|MenuItemClick>;

But was hoping there was a way to model it with a single interface.

1
  • 1
    Actually Microsoft suggests it should be: <MenuItemComponent|MenuItemClick>[]
    – Loolooii
    Feb 27 '19 at 14:56
5

I like using Pick along with a base type that includes all properties to establish these kinds of conditional requirements.

interface MenuItemProps {
  title: string;
  component: any;
  click: any;
  icon: string;
}

export interface MenuItem =
  Pick<MenuItemProps, "title" | "icon" | "component"> |
  Pick<MenuItemProps, "title" | "icon" | "click">

This is clean and also flexible. You can get arbitrarily complex with your requirements, asserting things like "require either all the properties, just these two properties, or just this one property" and so on while keeping your declaration simple and readable.

1
  • 1
    interfaces cannot "=" a type. If this was export interface MenuItem = ... it would be valid.
    – J'e
    Feb 28 '20 at 15:20
5

I use this:

type RequireField<T, K extends keyof T> = T & Required<Pick<T, K>>

Usage:

let a : RequireField<TypeA, "fieldA" | "fieldB">;

This makes fieldA and fieldB required.

1
  • For other readers: please note that this type will not make one of ( OR context ) the properties to be required, but rather both of them ( that said, in an AND context it will do just fine ). Jan 15 at 19:38
0

To just extends upon the cool answers above! And for the people that land here while searching for a Partial version with requiring capability! Here a snippet i made to take!

PartialReq

You want to have a Partial of an interface, but in mean time require some of the fields! Here how it's done

export type PartialReq<T, Keys extends keyof T = keyof T> =
    Pick<Partial<T>, Exclude<keyof T, Keys>>
    & {
        [K in Keys]: T[K]
    };

Use example

export interface CacheObj<SigType = any, ValType = any> {
    cache: Map<SigType, ValType>,
    insertionCallback: InsertionCallback<SigType, ValType> // I want this to be required
}

// ...

export class OneFlexibleCache<SigType = any, ValType = any> {
    private _cacheObj: CacheObj<SigType, ValType>;

    constructor(
        cacheObj: PartialReq<CacheObj<SigType, ValType>, 'insertionCallback'> // <-- here
                                                                           //  i used it
    ) {
        cacheObj = cacheObj || {};

        this._cacheObj = {

// ...

// _______________ usage
this._caches.set(
    cacheSignature,
    new OneFlexibleCache<InsertionSigType, InsertionValType>({
        insertionCallback // required need to be provided
    })
);

Here you can see that it work perfectly

enter image description here

If the required not provided

enter image description here

UPDATE: For the usage that i implied above here a better answer

I just went by the doc and found Omit.

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/utility-types.html#omittk

I came to add it. But before i do, I just seen this cool answer. It cover all:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/48216010/7668448

Just check it out! It show how to do it for all the different version of Typescript! And for the sake of not repeating ! Go and check!

0

Yet another solution:

type RequiredKeys<T, K extends keyof T> = Required<Pick<T, K>> & Omit<T, K>;

type MenuItem2 = RequiredKeys<MenuItem, "component" | "click">;

0

This approach combines never and Omit. Benefits here are that it's easy to understand and also easy to update if you need to add more properties.

interface Base {
  title: string;
  icon: string;
  component?: never;
  click?: never;
}

interface OnlyComponent {
  component: any;
}

interface OnlyClick {
  click: any;
}

export type MenuItem = (Omit<Base, 'component'> & OnlyComponent) | (Omit<Base, 'click'> & OnlyClick);

You can use in to narrow an instance of MenuItem:

const item: MenuItem = {
  title: 'A good title';
  icon: 'fa-plus';
  component: SomeComponent;
};

//...

if('component' in item) {
  const Comp = item.component;
  //...
}

0

Here's a simple way to implement either but not both

type MenuItem =  {
  title: string;
  component: any;
  click?: never;
  icon: string;
} | {
  title: string;
  component?: never;
  click: any;
  icon: string;
}

// good
const menuItemWithComponent: MenuItem = {
  title: 'title',
  component: "my component",
  icon: "icon"
}

// good
const menuItemWithClick: MenuItem = {
  title: 'title',
  click: "my click",
  icon: "icon"
}

// compile error
const menuItemWithBoth: MenuItem = {
  title: 'title',
  click: "my click",
  component: "my click",
  icon: "icon"
}

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