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I tried to use the map function with 1 pre-desined function and 1 parameter. Everything works fine till I call list() on map function. In the end it shows

IndexError: list index out of range

But when I simply call the function on the list without using map(), it was okay. Can anyone try and help me identify the bug?


people = ['Dr. Christopher Brooks', 'Dr. Kevyn Collins-Thompson', 'Dr. VG Vinod Vydiswaran', 'Dr. Daniel Romero']

def split_title_and_name(person):

    name_list=[]

    for i in person:
        i = i.split()[0]+" "+i.split()[-1]
        name_list.append(i)

    return name_list 

split_title_and_name(people)
list(map(split_title_and_name, people))
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  • Can you fix your indentation. map takes each individual person and applies the function split_title_and_name(). split_title_and_name('Dr. Chistopher Brooks') is very different from sending a list of names.
    – AChampion
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 2:44
  • You function seems designed for taking the iterable of names directly. It will of course throw an error if you map it on to people because when you iterate for i in person it iterates over the individual characters of a single name. When i reaches the space " " then split returns and empty list [] and indexing into an empty list will throw the IndexError Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 2:48

4 Answers 4

1

Those are not the same functionality. Your function operates on a list of people. map applies the function to each element of people. Thus, you're calling

split_title_and_name('Dr. Christopher Brooks')
split_title_and_name('Dr. Kevyn Collins-Thompson')
...

See the problem?

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Your function split_title_and_name works on a list of people, when you want it to work on one person at a time:

def split_title_and_name(person):
    return person.split()[0] + " " + person.split()[-1]
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Here is a better Solution:

    people = ['Dr. Christopher Brooks', 'Dr. Kevyn Collins-Thompson', 'Dr. VG Vinod Vydiswaran', 'Dr. Daniel Romero']

def split_title_and_name(person):
    title = person.split()[0]
    lastname = person.split()[-1]
    return '{} {}'.format(title, lastname)

list(map(split_title_and_name, people))

it looks less complex when I used format function.

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just in case you intend to use the function on "heavylifting" and wish to avoid repeated split calls... perhaps you should try to store first the splitted string... try :-)

people = ['Dr. Christopher Brooks', 'Dr. Kevyn Collins-Thompson', 'Dr. VG Vinod Vydiswaran', 'Dr. Daniel Romero']

def split_title_and_name(person):

    splitted_string = people.split() 
    title = splitted_string[0]
    lastname = splitted_string[-1]
    return '{} {}'.format(title, lastname)

list(map(split_title_and_name, people))

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