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I have the following homework problem to witch i can't seem to find the solution. PROBLEM: Create a 5x5 matrix of integers and check the if any of the elements of the matrix are in the interval [-10,15], and the ones that belong to the interval add to an array of 25 elements. The program should be implemented in C/C++. QUESTION: Now i have written the following code and the problem i have is when i try to transfer the elements that i have found that fit the condition, in the nested for-loop. The trouble is when i cycle through 5 elements and at the same time i iterate 25 elements. How can i do this? Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "stdafx.h"


void main()
{
    int i, j, k, l, m;
    int a[5][5];
    int b[25];


    printf("Please enter the elements of the matrix:\n");

    for ( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        for ( k = 0; k < 5; k++)
        {
            scanf_s("%d", &a[i][k]);
        }
    }

    for ( k = 0; k < 25; k++)
    {
        for ( l = 0; l < 5; l++)
        {
            if (a[k][l] > -10 && a[k][l] < 15) {
                b[k] = a[k][l];
            }
        }
    }
    printf("The elements which are in the range [-10, 15], are the   following:\n");

    for (m = 0; m < 25; m++)
    {
        printf("%d\n", b[m]);
    }
}
  • Correct on the loop variable, @addy except they also need to keep a counter which keeps the index used for the b array and increment it each time an element is added. e.g. b[bi++] = a[k][l] – paddy Nov 10 '16 at 8:03
  • You are right Paddy. Lemme edit my comment. I am unable to edit, so i removed my previous comment and added new comment. – Adnan Bin Mustafa Nov 10 '16 at 8:04
  • Ivan remove K<25 and put k<5 there. because you have 5x5 array as input from user. and now you are looping 25x5. and use another index variable for second array as answered by @paddy int index=0; for ( k = 0; k < 25; k++) { for ( l = 0; l < 5; l++) { if (a[k][l] > -10 && a[k][l] < 15) { b[index] = a[k][l]; index++ } } } – Adnan Bin Mustafa Nov 10 '16 at 8:08
  • b[k] is wrong. You need to access b using an independent index (not one of the indexes that you are using in order to access a). – barak manos Nov 10 '16 at 8:20
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I think, we could have squeezed both the loops into one. Please see below. While i am accepting the input, there itself i am checking for the condition and putting it into the new 1D array. Since,I have the counter for the 1D array(which increments as new numbers are inserted), while displaying; i can use that as well.

    #include <stdio.h>


    int main()
    {
        int a[5][5];
        int b[15];
        int c=0;
printf("Please enter the elements of the matrix:\n");
        for(int i=0;i<5; i++){
            for(int j=0;j<5;j++){
               scanf("%d",&a[i][j]);
                if(a[i][j]>-10 && a[i][j]<15){
                    b[c++]=a[i][j];
                }
            }
        }
printf("\nThe numbers that meet the condition are:\n");
        for(int i=0;i<c;i++)
        printf("%d,",b[i]); 

        return 0;
    }
  • Yes, thank you, this is also a solution. My initial miss was the extra counter for the 1D array. This is also a very compact way of solving this. – Ivan Alexander Nov 11 '16 at 7:10
  • if this solves your issue, i would like to request you to make it as an answer, so that others facing similar/same problem is helped. – lifeOfPi Nov 12 '16 at 14:29
3

The following loop is incorrect:

for ( k = 0; k < 25; k++)
{
    for ( l = 0; l < 5; l++)
    {
        if (a[k][l] > -10 && a[k][l] < 15) {
            b[k] = a[k][l];
        }
    }
}

You mix the input 5x5 matrix and the output array. This is how it should look like:

k = 0;
for ( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    for ( l = 0; l < 5; l++)
    {
        if (a[i][l] > -10 && a[i][l] < 15) {
            b[k++] = a[i][l];
        }
    }
}

The only thing that I omitted is k < 25 condition. You might want to use it too.

  • Thanks a lot for the answer, this is the missing part i was looking for. Thanks again :) – Ivan Alexander Nov 10 '16 at 9:02
2

Remember that an array in C is a contiguous area of memory. An array of five arrays are just the same, it's just a chunk of contiguous memory.

Now for simplicity's sake lets take a smaller matrix, like e.g.

int a[2][2];

In memory it's laid out like this:

+---------+---------+---------+---------+
| a[0][0] | a[0][1] | a[1][0] | a[1][1] |
+---------+---------+---------+---------+

Lets take a corresponding array:

int b[4];

which is laid out like

+------+------+------+------+
| b[0] | b[1] | b[2] | b[3] |
+------+------+------+------+

In memory, the matrix and the array looks very much like each other, don't they? They basically are the same, it's just the semantics and what the language (and compiler) allows that differs.

What you need to do is figure out some way to map the indexes of the matrix to the indexes of the array. So a[0][0] corresponds to b[0], a[0][1] corresponds to b[1], a[1][0] corresponds to b[2], a[1][1] corresponds to b[3].

So how to get from e.g. a[0][1] b[1]? That's seems to be very simple, just add the row and column indexes together and you have the result.

But how to get from a[1][0] to b[2]? That's a little harder, but still easy if you think a little. The matrix is an array of two arrays, and two multiplied by one (the row index) is equal to two.

Finally the last one, a[1][1] to b[3]. Combining the two formulas above, we multiply the row index by the size and add the column index: 1 * 2 + 1.

Generalizing it, if you have an array of I rows, and looping over it using the indexes i for the rows and j for the columns then the corresponding index in a plain array is i * I + j.

In code its something like

int a[I][J] = { ... };  // Initialization, doesn't matter exactly what
int b[I * J] = { 0 };  // Initialize all to zero

// Loop over rows
for (int i = 0; i < I; ++i)
{
    // Loop over columns
    for (int j = 0; j < J; ++j)
    {
        b[i * I + j] = a[i][j];
    }
}

For your specific use-case you might want to initialize the array b a little differently (to distinguish "unused" elements in the array from actual zeroes), and of course add a check for the matrix value.


I realize this might not be exactly what you're after, but the loop shown above could be one solution. And it's also a solution that allows you to go back and forth between the matrix and the array. If you have the array index you can calculate the matrix indexes, and if you have the matrix indexes you can calculate the array index.

For a solution where you don't map between the matrix and the array like I do, but just insert the values at the next "available" position in the array, then the other two answers will show you how.

  • Thank you, very comprehensive explanation. Very helpful in my understanding of array manipulations. Thanks. – Ivan Alexander Nov 10 '16 at 9:04
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Have a separate index for the B array;

int b_i = 0;

then loop 5x5 times the A array

for ( k = 0; k < 5; k++)  //only 5 times
{
    for ( l = 0; l < 5; l++)
    {
        if (a[k][l] > -10 && a[k][l] < 15) {
            b[b_i] = a[k][l];
            b_i++;
        }
    }
}

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