54

I'd like to provide separate behaviour for browsers supporting hover (e.g. desktop browsers) and ones which don't (e.g. touchscreen devices). Specifically I want to declare a hover state on browsers that support it, but not for browsers that don't, so as to avoid having mobile browsers emulate it with extra taps, as this breaks other interactions on the page - by not defining a hover state for those browsers this is avoided.

I've read up on the Interaction Media Queries feature and it looks like it should do the trick. I'd be able to do something like:

@media (hover: none) {
  /* behaviour for touch browsers */
}

According to CanIUse it is available on all the browsers I need to support except IE11 and Firefox.

So I wondered if I could do it the other way around - since the main touch devices all support it, then negate it:

@media not (hover: none) {
  /* behaviour for desktop browsers */
}

However, this doesn't seem to work at all.

Pseudocode example of what I'm trying to do:

.myelement {
  /* some styling */
  /* note: no hover state here */
}
@media(this device supports hover) {
  .myelement:hover {
    /* more styling */
  }
}

So, is there a way to make this work in the way intended, or am I down the wrong track?

6
  • 3
    Please don't use the media query "hover". I'm working with a mouse on my 27" monitor, but all of my browsers have the setting "hover:none" although I like and am able to hover a lot. Maybe all my browser have hover:none because my laptop where my peripheral devices are connected to has a touch screen. Maybe you can try the any-hover media query developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/@media/any-hover
    – Andreas
    Jul 5, 2019 at 21:46
  • @Andreas Make this one an answer so it is prominent enough to be found. I was going crazy because of this. Everyone is talking about hover and neither of my browsers was capable of either detecting my mouse via pointer:fine nor accepting hover via hover:hover. But this hint was solving it ... Feb 26, 2021 at 13:36
  • 1
    I've made a website where you can test the setting of your browser referring to this problem andreasburg.de/lenovo-browser-hover-check.html
    – Andreas
    Mar 23, 2021 at 16:22
  • now in at least 2021, you have two keywords for hover as mentioned in here in MDN docs, not sure you were looking for this implementation, but hope someone would find this useful in the future! Oct 6, 2021 at 8:45
  • 1
    Note that Samsung devices have a bug where they report (hover:hover) instead of (hover:none)! ctrl.blog/entry/css-media-hover-samsung.html
    – Daniel
    Apr 5 at 14:34

6 Answers 6

65

not should prefix media type (screen, print, all, etc) and not media feature (hover, point, etc).

Wrong:

@media not (hover: none)

Correct:

@media not all and (hover: none)

Yes, its unintuitive and weird. Source (see comments).

So you do not need javascript to alternate result of media query.

10
  • 1
    Upvote. Unlike the above, this works without any javascript. It is indeed counterintuitive.
    – gmdavisUX
    Jun 6, 2017 at 13:25
  • 6
    Great trick! Just note that IE11 appears to ignore this rule altogether. Using another IE-specific hack, it appears the following works (in spite of it being the negated version of the workaround): @media not all and (hover: none), (-ms-high-contrast: none) {
    – Stiggler
    Jan 22, 2018 at 3:58
  • 3
    Neither @media (hover: none) nor the negation @media not all and (hover: none) do anything in Firefox. That browser doesn't support hover bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1035774 but should there not be a way of writing the not such that if the subject of not is undefined/unrecognized then it evaluates to false (and the entire media query evaluates to true)?
    – EoghanM
    Aug 29, 2018 at 15:05
  • 3
    not (hover: none) is not, or at least no longer, wrong. It's correct, according to Media Queries 4. It just isn't supported by any browser yet, frustratingly. See stackoverflow.com/questions/24455958/…
    – BoltClock
    Oct 22, 2018 at 14:35
  • 2
    Stupid question, why not using @media (hover) {...desktop styles...} ?
    – basZero
    Jun 25, 2020 at 12:37
19

From the specs:

none

Indicates that the primary pointing system can’t hover, or there is no pointing system. Examples include touchscreens and screens that use a drawing stylus.
Pointing systems that can hover, but for which doing so is inconvenient and not part of the normal way they are used, also match this value.

For example, a touchscreen where a long press is treated as hovering would match hover: none.

If your browser (mobile/touch) support long-press to simulate hover, the usage of hover: none will not work. What you can do is just use a default value and override it (with default css precedence):

body {
    background: red;
}

@media (hover: hover) {
  body {
    background: blue;
  }
}

Desktop will have blue background and mobile/touch will have red background

Check the following example:
https://jsfiddle.net/mcy60pvt/1/

To check the long-press option of the mobile you can use this example:
https://jsfiddle.net/mcy60pvt/3/

In the above example the green block has :hover definition for both desktop and mobile, however for desktop the background will change to yellow and for mobile (with long-press) it will change to white.

Here is the css for the last example:

body {
    background: red;
}
div.do-hover {
  border: 1px solid black;
  width: 250px;
  height: 250px;
  background: green;
}
div.do-hover:hover {
  background: white;
}

@media (hover: hover) {
  body {
    background: blue;
  }
  div.do-hover:hover {
    background: yellow;
  }
}

In this example - browsers that don't support :hover will view the hover me box with green background, and while "hover" (touch/long-press) - the background will change to white.

update

As for the added pseudo code:

.myelement {
    /* some styling #1 */
    /* note: no hover state here */
}
@media(hover: hover) {
    .myelement {
        /* some styling that override #1 styling in case this browser suppot the hover*/
    }
    .myelement:hover {
        /* what to do when hover */
    }
}
12
  • Thanks but this leaves me in the same situation where browsers not supporting the hover media query don't behave correctly.
    – moogal
    Nov 10, 2016 at 17:22
  • why not? If they don't support the hove media they will get the background green (unless you add a new background color inside the hover: hover part).
    – Dekel
    Nov 10, 2016 at 17:24
  • I'll add it to the answer, 1 minute
    – Dekel
    Nov 10, 2016 at 17:24
  • I've added an example to the question to try to clarify. The idea would be that a hover state is only declared for browsers which support hover, so that mobile browsers don't try to emulate it.
    – moogal
    Nov 10, 2016 at 17:33
  • 3
    Ok, so this is a bit of a different question. It's like to ask "how can I use css4 tricks with browsers that only support css3?" :) well, mostly you can't. If Firefox ignores the hover:hover definition - you don't really have something you can do with it (in pure css). You can use javascript to add class to the body element and use css based on that class (is-firefox, is-support-hover, is-mobile, etc...)
    – Dekel
    Nov 10, 2016 at 17:44
10

Thanks to Dekel's comments I solved this by running the logic in JS and applying a class instead:

e.g.

const canHover = !(matchMedia('(hover: none)').matches);
if(canHover) {
  document.body.classList.add('can-hover');
}

Then in the stylesheet:

.myElement {
  background: blue;
}
.can-hover .myElement:hover {
  background: red;
}

I've tested this on desktop Chrome, Safari and Firefox, and iOS Safari and it works as expected.

2
  • as said, js can (almost) always help you there :) +1 from me on the solution
    – Dekel
    Nov 11, 2016 at 16:57
  • Very clever answer. Good stuff
    – Drenai
    Jan 5, 2018 at 19:30
6

You can use this Sass mixin to style the hover, it will use the recommended substitute :active for touch devices. Works on all modern browsers and IE11.

/**
 Hover styling for all devices and browsers
 */
@mixin hover() {
    @media (hover: none) {
        -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0);
        &:active {
            @content;
        }
    }

    @media (hover: hover), all and (-ms-high-contrast: none), (-ms-high-contrast: active) {
        &:hover {
            @content;
        }
    }
}

.element {
    @include hover {
         background: red;
    }
}
2
  • 1
    This is the best solution I found, but FYI, it doesn't support Firefox 63 and below.
    – Pluto
    Sep 23, 2019 at 20:26
  • @Pluto Thanks for the insight. That's not too bad, those versions fall below a global usage of 0.1%. Sep 26, 2019 at 13:29
1

According to Artin´s answer we can address only devices that support hover with pure css, with @media not all and (hover: none). It looks weird but it works.

I made a Sass mixin out of this for easier use:

@mixin hover-supported {
    @media not all and (hover: none) {
        &:hover {
            @content;
        }
    }
}

The following would change background-color of .container from red to blue on hover for devices that support hover, no change for touch devices:

.container {
    background-color: red;

    @include hover-supported() {
        background-color: blue;
    }
}
0

To support Firefox (see https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1035774 ), you need to potentially write some rules twice. Note, although not specified in the question I've added pointer: coarse on the assumption that the purpose of these rules is to target mobile screens:

/* BEGIN devices that DON'T pinch/zoom */
/* If https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1035774 
is fixed then we can wrap this section in a ...
@media not all and (pointer: coarse) and (hover: none) {
.. and do away with the 'NEGATE' items below */

.myelement {
  /* some styling that you want to be desktop only (style as an anchor on desktop) */
  font-size: 14px;
  text-decoration: underline;
  border: none;
}
/* END devices that DON'T pinch/zoom */

/* BEGIN devices that DO pinch/zoom */   
@media (pointer: coarse) and (hover: none) {
  .myelement {
    /* style as a large button on mobile */
    font-size: inherit;  /* maintain e.g. larger mobile font size */
    text-decoration: none;  /* NEGATE */
    border: 1px solid grey;
  }

  .myelement:hover {
    /* hover-only styling */
  }
}
/* END devices that DO pinch/zoom */

The combination of (pointer: coarse) and (hover: none) should become more useful to target mobile devices as mobile screens become larger and we lose the correlation between pixel dimensions and mobile vs. desktop (already the case when you wish to distinguish between tablet and desktop)

1

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