2

I have two tables BOOKINGS and WORKER. Basically there is table for a worker and a table to keep track of what the worker has to do in a time frame aka booking. I’m trying to check if there is an available worker for a job, so I query the booking to check if requested time has available workers between the start end date. However, I get stuck on the next part. Which is returning the list of workers that do have that time available. I read that I could join the table passed on a shared column, so I tried doing an inner join with the WORKER_NAME column, but when I try to do this I get a ambiguous error. This leads me to believe I misunderstood the concept. Does anyone understand what I;m trying to do and knows how to do it, or knows why I have the error below. Thanks guys !!!!

CREATE TABLE WORKER (
            ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
            WORKER_NAME  varchar(80) NOT NULL,
            WORKER_CODE  INT, 
            WORKER_WAGE  INT, 
            PRIMARY KEY (ID)
)

CREATE TABLE BOOKING (
            ID INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
            WORKER_NAME  varchar(80) NOT NULL,
            START DATE NOT NULL,
            END DATE NOT NULL, 
            PRIMARY KEY (ID)
)

query

SELECT *
FROM WORKERS
INNER JOIN BOOKING
ON WORKER_NAME = WORKER_NAME
WHERE (START NOT BETWEEN '2010-10-01' AND '2010-10-10')
ORDER BY ID

#1052 - Column 'WORKER_NAME' in on clause is ambiguous

4

In your query, the column "worker_name" exists in two tables; in this case, you must reference the tablename as part of the column identifer.

SELECT *
FROM WORKERS
INNER JOIN BOOKING
ON workers.WORKER_NAME = booking.WORKER_NAME
WHERE (START NOT BETWEEN '2010-10-01' AND '2010-10-10')
ORDER BY ID
4
  • 1
    ORDER BY WORKERS.ID
    – AJ_
    Nov 10 '16 at 22:15
  • The resulting query combines both the tables into one column, is there a way to get get the worker columns that match ? Example ID WORKER_NAME WORKER_CODE WORKER_WAGE ID WORKER_NAME START END
    – AJ_
    Nov 10 '16 at 22:23
  • Given that not all those columns are contained in both tables, I would say no - in fact, I'm not sure the question makes sense. How does it combine both the tables into one column? Do you want to have two rows, one for each table?
    – T Gray
    Nov 10 '16 at 22:56
  • @TGray Thanks for replying. Yeah im trying to just get the WORKER table rows. Basically booking keeps track of all the times each worker is available. It keeps track of the worker by the WORKER_NAME. Which acts as a foreign key so i can grab a worker that is free. Make more sense? Once again thanks for the help.
    – AJ_
    Nov 11 '16 at 0:49
1

In your query, the column WORKER_NAME and ID columns exists in both tables, where WORKER_NAME retains the same meaning and ID is re-purposed; in this case, you must either specify you are using WORKER_NAME as the join search condition or 'project away' (rename or omit) the duplicate ID problem.

Because the ID columns are AUTO_INCREMENT, I assume (hope!) they have no business meaning. Therefore, they could both be omitted, allowing a natural join that will cause duplicate columns to be 'projected away'. This is one of those situations where one wishes SQL had a WORKER ( ALL BUT ( ID ) ) type syntax; instead, one is required to do it longhand. It might be easier in the long run to to opt for a consistent naming convention and rename the columns to WORKER_ID and BOOKING_ID respectively.

You would also need to identify a business key to order on e.g. ( START, WORKER_NAME ):

  SELECT *
  FROM
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, WORKER_CODE, WORKER_WAGE FROM WORKER ) AS W
  NATURAL JOIN
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, START, END FROM BOOKING ) AS B
  WHERE ( START NOT BETWEEN '2010-10-01' AND '2010-10-10' )
  ORDER BY START, WORKER_NAME;

This is good, but its returning the start and end times as well. I'm just wanting the WOKER ROWS. I cant take the start and end out, because then sql doesn’t recognize the where clause.

Two approaches spring to mind: push the where clause to the subquery:

  SELECT *
  FROM
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, WORKER_CODE, WORKER_WAGE FROM WORKER ) AS W
  NATURAL JOIN
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, START, END
      FROM BOOKING
     WHERE START NOT BETWEEN '2010-10-01' AND '2010-10-10' ) AS B
  ORDER BY START, WORKER_NAME;

Alternatively, replace SELECT * with a list of columns you want to SELECT:

  SELECT WORKER_NAME, WORKER_CODE, WORKER_WAGE
  FROM
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, WORKER_CODE, WORKER_WAGE FROM WORKER ) AS W
  NATURAL JOIN
  ( SELECT WORKER_NAME, START, END FROM BOOKING ) AS B
  WHERE START NOT BETWEEN '2010-10-01' AND '2010-10-10'
  ORDER BY START, WORKER_NAME;
2
  • This is actually exactly what i was looking for. Thanks.
    – AJ_
    Nov 11 '16 at 18:18
  • This is good, but its returning the start and end times as well. I'm just wanting the WOKER ROWS. I cant take the start and end out, because then sql doesn’t recognize the where clause.
    – AJ_
    Nov 11 '16 at 18:29
0

This error comes after you attempt to call a field which exists in both tables, therefore you should make a reference. For instance in example below I first say cod.coordinator so that DBMS know which coordinator I want

SELECT project__number, surname, firstname,cod.coordinator FROMcoordinatorsAS co JOIN hub_applicants AS ap ON co.project__number = ap.project_id JOIN coordinator_duties AS cod ON co.coordinator = cod.email

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