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I would like to translate this JS regular expression

^((8|\+7)[\- ]?)?(\(?\d{3}\)?[\- ]?)?[\d\- ]{7,10}$

to use in grep. All phone numbers bellow match it:

+79261234567
89261234567
79261234567
+7 926 123 45 67
8(926)123-45-67
123-45-67
9261234567
79261234567
(495)1234567
(495) 123 45 67
89261234567
8-926-123-45-67
8 927 1234 234
8 927 12 12 888
8 927 12 555 12
8 927 123 8 123

I've tried a lot of variants but no one works for me.

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  • This is possibly relevant.
    – Eli Sadoff
    Nov 11 '16 at 1:39
  • This looks like a problem for which regex is well-suited. What is your reason from wanting to move away from regex? Nov 11 '16 at 1:39
  • Wouldn't this just be grep -E '[0-9]'
    – I0_ol
    Nov 11 '16 at 1:40
  • My comment is strange because grep uses a regex. Oops Nov 11 '16 at 1:45
  • @I0_ol no. for one, it can match + as the first character. Nov 11 '16 at 2:26
1

I haven't tested your pattern, although a few things to consider are:

[\- ] should instead be [- ] or [ -]

(in a character class [] escaping dash is unnecessary if it's first or last).

[\d] will probably fail so either use [0-9] or [:digit:]

So this leaves you with:

grep -E "^((8|\+7)[ -]?)?(\(?[0-9]{3}\)?[ -]?)?[0-9 -]{7,10}$" file

or egrep:

egrep "^((8|\+7)[ -]?)?(\(?[0-9]{3}\)?[ -]?)?[0-9 -]{7,10}$" file

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