40

How can I mark a test as an expected failure in JUnit 4?

In this case I want to continue to run this test until something is patched upstream. Ignoring the test goes a little too far, as then I might forget about it. I may be able to add an @expected annotation and catch the exception thrown by assertThat, but that also seems to lie about the expected behavior.

Here's what my current test looks like:

@Test
public void unmarshalledDocumentHasExpectedValue() 
{
    doc = unmarshaller.unmarshal(getResourceAsStream("mydoc.xml"));
    final ST title = doc.getTitle();
    assertThat(doc.getTitle().toStringContent(), equalTo("Expected"));
}

That assert should succeed, but because of an upstream bug it doesn't. Yet, that test is correct; it should succeed. Virtually all the alternatives that I've found are misleading. Right now I think @Ignore("This test should pass once fixed upstream") is my best bet, but I still have to remember to come back to it. I'd prefer that the test run.

In Python I can use the expectedFailure decorator:

class ExpectedFailureTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    @unittest.expectedFailure
    def test_fail(self):
        self.assertEqual(1, 0, "broken")

With Qt's QTestLib in C++, you can use QEXPECT_FAIL:

QEXPECT_FAIL("", "Will be fixed next version", Continue);
QCOMPARE(i, 42);

In both cases above, the unit test runs which is what I'm hoping to have happen. Am I missing something in JUnit?

17
+50

I'm assuming here that you want the test to pass if your assert fails, but if the assert succeeds, then the test should pass as well.

The easiest way to do this is to use a TestRule. TestRule gives the opportunity to execute code before and after a test method is run. Here is an example:

public class ExpectedFailureTest {
    public class ExpectedFailure implements TestRule {
        public Statement apply(Statement base, Description description) {
            return statement(base, description);
        }

        private Statement statement(final Statement base, final Description description) {
            return new Statement() {
                @Override
                public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                    try {
                        base.evaluate();
                    } catch (Throwable e) {
                        if (description.getAnnotation(Deprecated.class) != null) {
                            // you can do whatever you like here.
                            System.err.println("test failed, but that's ok:");
                        } else {
                            throw e;
                        }
                    }
                }
            };
        }
    }

    @Rule public ExpectedFailure expectedFailure = new ExpectedFailure();

    // actually fails, but we catch the exception and make the test pass.
    @Deprecated
    @Test public void testExpectedFailure() {
        Object o = null;
        o.equals("foo");
    }

    // fails
    @Test public void testExpectedFailure2() {
        Object o = null;
        o.equals("foo");
    }
}

First, note that the first method is marked as @Deprecated. I'm using this as a marker for the method for which I want to ignore any assertion failures. You can do whatever you like to identify the methods, this is just an example.

Next, in the ExpectedFailure#apply(), when I do the base.evaluate(), I'm catching any Throwable (which includes AssertionError) and if the method is marked with the annotation @Deprecated, I ignore the error. You can perform whatever logic you like to decide whether you should ignore the error or not, based on version number, some text, etc. You can also pass a dynamically determined flag into ExpectedFailure to allow it to fail for certain version numbers:

public void unmarshalledDocumentHasExpectedValue() {
    doc = unmarshaller.unmarshal(getResourceAsStream("mydoc.xml"));

    expectedFailure.setExpectedFailure(doc.getVersionNumber() < 3000);

    final ST title = doc.getTitle();
    assertThat(doc.getTitle().toStringContent(), equalTo("Expected"));
}

For further examples, see ExternalResource, and ExpectedException

Ignoring an expected failure test rather than passing it

If you want to mark you tests as Ignored rather than Success, it becomes a bit more complex, because tests are ignored before they are executed, so you have to retrospectively mark a test as ignored, which would involve constructing your own Runner. To give you a start, see my answer to How to define JUnit method rule in a suite?. Or ask another question.

  • Brilliant! Just create an annotation, like ExpectedFailure(behavior=SucceedWhenTestFails) and use that instead of Deprecated and the test would be perfectly readable and well documented. – Kaleb Pederson Nov 11 '11 at 18:09
25

I'm not quite getting the specifics of your scenario, but here's how I generally test for expected failure:

The slick new way:

@Test(expected=NullPointerException.class)
public void expectedFailure() {
    Object o = null;
    o.toString();
}

for older versions of JUnit:

public void testExpectedFailure() {
    try {
        Object o = null;
        o.toString();
        fail("shouldn't get here");
    }
    catch (NullPointerException e) {
        // expected
    }
}

If you have a bunch of things that you want to ensure throw an exception, you may also want to use this second technique inside a loop rather than creating a separate test method for each case. If you were just to loop through a bunch of cases in a single method using expected, the first one to throw an exception would end the test, and the subsequent cases wouldn't get checked.

  • 2
    That is better handled by: @Test(expected=NullPointerException.class). Then you can remove the try/catch block and the fail statement as JUnit will tell you it expected an exception and didn't receive one if one was not thrown. – Kaleb Pederson Oct 29 '10 at 19:51
  • Indeed it is. I'd forgotten they'd added that. – Brad Mace Oct 29 '10 at 19:54
15

What about explicitly expecting an AssertionError?

@Test(expected = AssertionError.class)
public void unmarshalledDocumentHasExpectedValue() {
    // ...
}

If you're reasonably confident that only the JUnit machinery within the test would raise AssertionError, this seems as self-documenting as anything.

You'd still run the risk of forgetting about such a test. I wouldn't let such tests into version control for long, if ever.

  • Good idea! I'll accept in a few days unless a better answer comes along. (If I haven't accepted an answer by then ping me because I forgot). – Kaleb Pederson Nov 10 '11 at 1:07
  • That might be the best option... but it feels dirty that when the assertion succeeds the test will "fail". – Samuel Edwin Ward Nov 10 '11 at 20:11
  • @SamuelEdwinWard Agreed that it feels dirty...however, I would use this only for short-lived failures. If they last longer than a couple of SCM checkin cycles, the test is probably stale and so I'd remove it. – pholser Nov 21 '11 at 21:43
7

One option is mark the test as @Ignore and put text in there that is a bug perhaps and awaiting a fix. That way it won't run. It will then become skipped. You could also make use of the extensions to suit your need in a potentially different way.

4

I've taken Matthew's answer a step further and actually implemented an @Optional annotation you could use instead of the @Deprecated marker annotation he mentions in his answer. Although simple, I'll share the code with you, maybe it's of help for someone:

@Target(ElementType.METHOD)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Documented
public @interface Optional {

  /**
   * Specify a Throwable, to cause a test method to succeed even if an exception
   * of the specified class is thrown by the method.
   */
  Class<? extends Throwable>[] exception();
}

With a simple alteration of Matt's ExpectedFailure class:

public class ExpectedFailure implements TestRule {

  @Override
  public Statement apply(final Statement base, final Description description) {
    return statement(base, description);
  }

  private Statement statement(final Statement base, final Description description) {
    return new Statement() {

      @Override
      public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
        try {
          base.evaluate();
        } catch (Throwable e) {
          // check for certain exception types
          Optional annon = description.getAnnotation(Optional.class);
          if (annon != null && ArrayUtils.contains(annon.exception(), e.getClass())) {
            // ok
          } else {
            throw e;
          }
        }
      }
    };
  }
}

You can now annotate your test method with @Optional and it will not fail, even if the given type of exception is raised (provide one or more types you would like the test method to pass):

public class ExpectedFailureTest {

  @Rule public ExpectedFailure expectedFailure = new ExpectedFailure();

  // actually fails, but we catch the exception and make the test pass.
  @Optional(exception = NullPointerException.class)
  @Test public void testExpectedFailure() {
      Object o = null;
      o.equals("foo");
  }

}

[UPDATE]

You could also rewrite your tests using JUnit's org.junit.Assume instead of the tradtional org.junit.Assert, if you want your tests to pass even if the assumption does not hold.

From Assume's JavaDoc:

A set of methods useful for stating assumptions about the conditions in which a test is meaningful.A failed assumption does not mean the code is broken, but that the test provides no useful information. The default JUnit runner treats tests with failing assumptions as ignored.

Assume is available since JUnit 4.4

1

Use mocked upstream class if possible. Stub it with correct result. Optionally, replace mock with real object after bug is fixed.

  • 1
    After you do that you may not come back to real object anyway :-) – topchef Nov 1 '10 at 20:39

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