8

I have a file with 10,000 lines. Using the following command, I am deleting all lines after line 10,000.

sed -i '10000,$ d' file.txt

However, now I would like to delete the first X lines so that the file has no more than 10,000 lines.

I think it would be something like this:

sed -i '1,$x d' file.txt

Where $x would be the number of lines over 10,000. I'm a little stuck on how to write the if, then part of it. Or, I was thinking I could use the original command and just cat the file in reverse?

For example, if we wanted just 3 lines from the bottom (seems simpler after a few helpful answers):

Input:

Example Line 1
Example Line 2
Example Line 3
Example Line 4
Example Line 5

Expected Output:

Example Line 3
Example Line 4
Example Line 5

Of course, if you know a more efficient way to write the command, I would be open to that too. Your positive input is highly appreciated.

  • 1
    tail – kaylum Nov 11 '16 at 21:03
  • 1
    Ah, sure, I'll add it now haha. – DomainsFeatured Nov 11 '16 at 21:26
  • 2
    Why won't a simple tail -n 3 file work for you? – Ed Morton Nov 11 '16 at 21:35
  • Yup, @kaylum provided that. I went with the sed option because it was inplace and already what I was struggling with. – DomainsFeatured Nov 11 '16 at 21:38
  • sed is for simple substitutions on individual lines, that is all. Don't get lured into using it for other stuff (e.g. deleting sections of a file) just because it has a -i option that tells it to create a temp file on the fly instead of you having to name it. Just use the right tool for each job and if you have to name the temp file yourself it's just not a big deal compared to having to figure out what convoluted sed syntax hoops to jump through for every job. – Ed Morton Nov 11 '16 at 21:41
4

For simplicity, I would reverse the file, keep the first 10000 lines, then re-reverse the file.

It makes saving the file in-place a touch more complicated

source=file.txt
temp=$(mktemp)
tac "$source" | sed '10000 q' | tac > "$temp" && mv "$temp" "$source"

Without reversing the file, you'd count the number of lines and do some arithmetic:

sed -i "1,$(( $(wc -l < file.txt) - 10000 )) d" file.txt
  • Why not just tail? – hidefromkgb Nov 11 '16 at 21:11
  • @hidefromkgb, I'd vote for a tail answer if you provide it – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:14
  • Nevermind, Think I got it! – DomainsFeatured Nov 11 '16 at 21:18
  • What shell are you using? /bin/sh? what's the output of echo "$(($(wc -l < file.txt)-10000))? – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:18
10

tail can do exactly what you want.

tail -n 10000 file.txt
3
$ awk -v n=3 '{a[NR%n]=$0} END{for (i=NR+1;i<=(NR+n);i++) print a[i%n]}' file
Example Line 3
Example Line 4
Example Line 5

Add -i inplace if you have GNU awk and want to do "inplace" editing.

  • 2
    I see how that makes your life easier. Thanks Ed. – DomainsFeatured Nov 11 '16 at 21:33
3

To keep the first 10000 lines :

head -n 10000 file.txt 

To keep the last 10000 lines :

tail -n 10000 file.txt

Test with your file Example

tail -n 3 file.txt
Example Line 3
Example Line 4
Example Line 5
2

tac file.txt | sed "$x q" | tac | sponge file.txt

The sponge command is useful here in avoiding an additional temporary file.

  • if you're reversing the file, then you want to keep the first 10000 lines. – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:06
  • The question asks about deleting the first X lines so that the resulting file has no more than 10,000 lines. This command leaves the last 9,999 lines when x is 10000. – eddiem Nov 11 '16 at 21:08
  • 1
    Suppose you want to keep the last 5 lines. Does this do it?seq 20 | tac | sed '1,5d' | tac ? No, it removes the last 5 lines. You need sed -n '1,5p' or sed 5q in the pipeline instead. – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:11
  • 1
    Also, using -i without a filename is incorrect. – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:12
  • You are correct. – eddiem Nov 11 '16 at 21:13
2

tail -10000 <<<"$(cat file.txt)" > file.txt

Okay, not «just» tail, but this way it`s capable of inplace truncation.

  • Like the inplace use. – DomainsFeatured Nov 11 '16 at 21:20
  • 3
    That's fugly. But it works. I'd use $(< file.txt) if the shell supports it. Saves a few microseconds. – glenn jackman Nov 11 '16 at 21:21
  • 1
    Are you SURE it works? What guarantees the shell won't do > file.txt before it does cat file.txt? There's nothing could convince me to execute that code on any important data. – Ed Morton Nov 11 '16 at 21:22
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    The shell guarantees that I/O redirections are processed left-to-right. However, how here-strings actually work is murky enough that I wouldn't assume that cat actually has to complete before moving on to the next redirection. – chepner Nov 11 '16 at 21:34
  • @chepner Here-strings are just a variant of here-documents, right? And the official manual states that «All of the lines read up to that point [the terminating line] are then used as the standard input» (see 3.6.6 Here Documents). – hidefromkgb Nov 11 '16 at 21:44

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