243

How do you add an onload event to an element?

Can I use:

<div onload="oQuickReply.swap();" ></div>

for this?

  • best body better div – KingRider Mar 23 '16 at 13:06
  • 2
    div elements do not "load". – amn Dec 8 '18 at 18:26
  • 1
    There is a more relevant answer now - perhaps you can revise the accept? – mplungjan Nov 13 '19 at 21:41

24 Answers 24

245

No, you can't. The easiest way to make it work would be to put the function call directly after the element

Example:

...
<div id="somid">Some content</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
   oQuickReply.swap('somid');
</script>
...

or - even better - just in front of </body>:

...
<script type="text/javascript">
   oQuickReply.swap('somid');
</script>
</body>

...so it doesn't block the following content from loading.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Depending on the usage it is not better to put it in front of </body>. f.e. if you want to hide the <div> only if javascript is enabled but avoid "flashing". The visibility time depends on how long the browser needs to load/parse all inline/external scripts. – mgutt Jul 24 '13 at 10:24
  • Is this an anti-pattern, in that it's better to keep all js inside its own file? Is there a way to selectively run js when certain elements are loaded into the document? – Ryan Walton Dec 17 '15 at 20:51
  • 1
    It's not an anti-pattern, but you usually wait for the DOM to be loaded and then do all the JS stuff. – DanMan Dec 17 '15 at 22:57
  • 2
    Throw this link out here for anyone that comes across this answer w3schools.com/tags/ev_onload.asp - All the HTML elements that currently support onload – Brandon Benefield Mar 13 '18 at 18:39
  • This answer is no longer relevant. Here is a new one – mplungjan Nov 13 '19 at 21:42
80

The onload event can only be used on the document(body) itself, frames, images, and scripts. In other words, it can be attached to only body and/or each external resource. The div is not an external resource and it's loaded as part of the body, so the onload event doesn't apply there.

| improve this answer | |
  • 19
    Not only in body element, you can use it as well with image and iframe for example, among others. w3schools.com/jsref/event_onload.asp – Joe Sep 26 '14 at 9:14
  • 2
    It is worth noting that inline scripts are NOT external resources, and so onload doesn't work on any <script> without a src HTML attribute (I was trying to use this advice in an inline script, and found it wasn't working) – gog Apr 4 '18 at 8:36
70

You can trigger some js automatically on an IMG element using onerror, and no src.

<img src onerror='alert()'>
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Brilliant! Can be used to trigger typescript from angular as well: img src (error)="function()" /> – Brian Richardson May 26 '17 at 20:29
  • 1
    This a fantastic approach. Please see my expansion of your solution here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4057236/… – Rounin Nov 13 '19 at 16:43
  • Caniuse?͏͏͏͏͏͏͏ – Pacerier Jun 11 at 6:29
  • This is a dirty workaround... But hey if it fits... – Enrico Sep 29 at 8:20
33

onload event it only supports with few tags like listed below.

<body>, <frame>, <iframe>, <img>, <input type="image">, <link>, <script>, <style>

Here the reference for onload event

| improve this answer | |
17

Try this! And never use trigger twice on div!

You can define function to call before the div tag.

$(function(){
    $('div[onload]').trigger('onload');
});

DEMO: jsfiddle

| improve this answer | |
  • Above jsfiddle doesn't have a jQuery loader - and doesn't work. – Arif Burhan Mar 6 '16 at 13:13
  • @Arif Burhan I don't get it. I do load JQuery(edge). Could you check again? I can see "Hello World" even using mobile. – Kuofp Mar 6 '16 at 13:45
  • @Kuofp That fiddle doesn't actually have handlers get called when their target elements are loaded. It just uses jquery to search for elements that have an attribute (in your case onload) and then calls those functions. The script works even if you change the attribute to something other than onload e.g. jsfiddle.net/mrszgbxh – Trindaz Aug 16 '16 at 1:06
  • 1
    @Trindaz Exactly! To put it another way, the scripts act like onload event. Thanks for leaving a comment! – Kuofp Aug 17 '16 at 3:06
10

I just want to add here that if any one want to call a function on load event of div & you don't want to use jQuery(due to conflict as in my case) then simply call a function after all the html code or any other code you have written including the function code and simply call a function .

/* All Other Code*/
-----
------
/* ----At the end ---- */
<script type="text/javascript">
   function_name();
</script>

OR

/* All Other Code*/
-----
------
/* ----At the end ---- */
<script type="text/javascript">
 function my_func(){
   function definition;      

  }

 my_func();
</script>
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you add more than one function this way? i.e. at the end of the html document just before the </body> tag? If yes, does the order in which they're written matter? – Neo Oct 10 '17 at 9:34
  • Yes you can add more than one function and the order won't matter its just plain (vanilla) javascript. – dev_khan Jan 5 '18 at 7:09
7

we can use MutationObserver to solve the problem in efficient way adding a sample code below

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title></title>
    <style>
        #second{
            position: absolute;
            width: 100px;
            height: 100px;
            background-color: #a1a1a1;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="first"></div>
<script>
    var callthis = function(element){
           element.setAttribute("tabIndex",0);
        element.focus();
        element.onkeydown = handler;
        function handler(){
                alert("called")
        }
    }


    var observer = new WebKitMutationObserver(function(mutations) {
        mutations.forEach(function(mutation) {
            for (var i = 0; i < mutation.addedNodes.length; i++)
            if(mutation.addedNodes[i].id === "second"){
                callthis(mutation.addedNodes[i]);
            }

        })
    });
    observer.observe(document.getElementById("first"), { childList: true });


    var ele = document.createElement('div');
    ele.id = "second"

    document.getElementById("first").appendChild(ele);

</script>

</body>
</html>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Last time I've checked mutation events performed terribly. – DanMan Nov 3 '14 at 22:51
7

I needed to have some initialization code run after a chunk of html (template instance) was inserted, and of course I didn't have access to the code that manipulates the template and modifies the DOM. The same idea holds for any partial modification of the DOM by insertion of an html element, usually a <div>.

Some time ago, I did a hack with the onload event of a nearly invisible <img> contained in a <div>, but discovered that a scoped, empty style will also do:

<div .... >
<style scoped="scoped" onload="dosomethingto(this.parentElement);" >   </style>
.....
</div>

Update(Jul 15 2017) - The <style> onload is not supported in last version of IE. Edge does support it, but some users see this as a different browser and stick with IE. The <img> element seems to work better across all browsers.

<div...>
<img onLoad="dosomthing(this.parentElement);" src="data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAP///wAAACH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAICRAEAOw==" />
...
</div>

To minimize the visual impact and resource usage of the image, use an inline src that keeps it small and transparent.

One comment I feel I need to make about using a <script>is how much harder it is to determine which <div> the script is near, especially in templating where you can't have an identical id in each instance that the template generates. I thought the answer might be document.currentScript, but this is not universally supported. A <script> element cannot determine its own DOM location reliably; a reference to 'this' points to the main window, and is of no help.

I believe it is necessary to settle for using an <img> element, despite being goofy. This might be a hole in the DOM/javascript framework that could use plugging.

| improve this answer | |
6

use an iframe and hide it iframe works like a body tag

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<iframe style="display:none" onload="myFunction()" src="http://www.w3schools.com"></iframe>
<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
function myFunction() {
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = "Iframe is loaded.";
}
</script>

</body>
</html>
| improve this answer | |
6

In November 2019, I am seeking a way to create a (hypothetical) onparse EventListener for <elements> which don't take onload.

The (hypothetical) onparse EventListener must be able to listen for when an element is parsed.


Third Attempt (and Definitive Solution)

I was pretty happy with the Second Attempt below, but it just struck me that I can make the code shorter and simpler, by creating a tailor-made event:

let parseEvent = new Event('parse');

This is the best solution yet.

The example below:

  1. Creates a tailor-made parse Event
  2. Declares a function (which can be run at window.onload or any time) which:
    • Finds any elements in the document which include the attribute data-onparse
    • Attaches the parse EventListener to each of those elements
    • Dispatches the parse Event to each of those elements to execute the Callback

Working Example:

// Create (homemade) parse event
let parseEvent = new Event('parse');

// Create Initialising Function which can be run at any time
const initialiseParseableElements = () => {

  // Get all the elements which need to respond to an onparse event
  let elementsWithParseEventListener = document.querySelectorAll('[data-onparse]');
  
  // Attach Event Listeners and Dispatch Events
  elementsWithParseEventListener.forEach((elementWithParseEventListener) => {

    elementWithParseEventListener.addEventListener('parse', updateParseEventTarget, false);
    elementWithParseEventListener.dataset.onparsed = elementWithParseEventListener.dataset.onparse;
    elementWithParseEventListener.removeAttribute('data-onparse');
    elementWithParseEventListener.dispatchEvent(parseEvent);
  });
}

// Callback function for the Parse Event Listener
const updateParseEventTarget = (e) => {
  
  switch (e.target.dataset.onparsed) {

    case ('update-1') : e.target.textContent = 'My First Updated Heading'; break;
    case ('update-2') : e.target.textContent = 'My Second Updated Heading'; break;
    case ('update-3') : e.target.textContent = 'My Third Updated Heading'; break;
    case ('run-oQuickReply.swap()') : e.target.innerHTML = 'This <code>&lt;div&gt;</code> is now loaded and the function <code>oQuickReply.swap()</code> will run...'; break;
  }
}

// Run Initialising Function
initialiseParseableElements();

let dynamicHeading = document.createElement('h3');
dynamicHeading.textContent = 'Heading Text';
dynamicHeading.dataset.onparse = 'update-3';

setTimeout(() => {

  // Add new element to page after time delay
  document.body.appendChild(dynamicHeading);

  // Re-run Initialising Function
  initialiseParseableElements();

}, 3000);
div {
  width: 300px;
  height: 40px;
  padding: 12px;
  border: 1px solid rgb(191, 191, 191);
}

h3 {
position: absolute;
top: 0;
right: 0;
}
<h2 data-onparse="update-1">My Heading</h2>
<h2 data-onparse="update-2">My Heading</h2>
<div data-onparse="run-oQuickReply.swap()">
This div hasn't yet loaded and nothing will happen.
</div>


Second Attempt

The First Attempt below (based on @JohnWilliams' brilliant Empty Image Hack) used a hardcoded <img /> and worked.

I thought it ought to be possible to remove the hardcoded <img /> entirely and only dynamically insert it after detecting, in an element which needed to fire an onparse event, an attribute like:

data-onparse="run-oQuickReply.swap()"

It turns out, this works very well indeed.

The example below:

  1. Finds any elements in the document which include the attribute data-onparse
  2. Dynamically generates an <img src /> and appends it to the document, immediately after each of those elements
  3. Fires the onerror EventListener when the rendering engine parses each <img src />
  4. Executes the Callback and removes that dynamically generated <img src /> from the document

Working Example:

// Get all the elements which need to respond to an onparse event
let elementsWithParseEventListener = document.querySelectorAll('[data-onparse]');

// Dynamically create and position an empty <img> after each of those elements 
elementsWithParseEventListener.forEach((elementWithParseEventListener) => {

  let emptyImage = document.createElement('img');
  emptyImage.src = '';
  elementWithParseEventListener.parentNode.insertBefore(emptyImage, elementWithParseEventListener.nextElementSibling);
});

// Get all the empty images
let parseEventTriggers = document.querySelectorAll('img[src=""]');

// Callback function for the EventListener below
const updateParseEventTarget = (e) => {

  let parseEventTarget = e.target.previousElementSibling;
  
  switch (parseEventTarget.dataset.onparse) {

    case ('update-1') : parseEventTarget.textContent = 'My First Updated Heading'; break;
    case ('update-2') : parseEventTarget.textContent = 'My Second Updated Heading'; break;
    case ('run-oQuickReply.swap()') : parseEventTarget.innerHTML = 'This <code>&lt;div&gt;</code> is now loaded and the function <code>oQuickReply.swap()</code> will run...'; break;
  }
  
  // Remove empty image
  e.target.remove();
}

// Add onerror EventListener to all the empty images
parseEventTriggers.forEach((parseEventTrigger) => {
  
  parseEventTrigger.addEventListener('error', updateParseEventTarget, false);
  
});
div {
  width: 300px;
  height: 40px;
  padding: 12px;
  border: 1px solid rgb(191, 191, 191);
}
<h2 data-onparse="update-1">My Heading</h2>
<h2 data-onparse="update-2">My Heading</h2>
<div data-onparse="run-oQuickReply.swap()">
This div hasn't yet loaded and nothing will happen.
</div>


First Attempt

I can build on @JohnWilliams' <img src> hack (on this page, from 2017) - which is, so far, the best approach I have come across.

The example below:

  1. Fires the onerror EventListener when the rendering engine parses <img src />
  2. Executes the Callback and removes the <img src /> from the document

Working Example:

let myHeadingLoadEventTrigger = document.getElementById('my-heading-load-event-trigger');

const updateHeading = (e) => {

  let myHeading = e.target.previousElementSibling;
  
  if (true) { // <= CONDITION HERE
    
    myHeading.textContent = 'My Updated Heading';
  }
  
  // Modern alternative to document.body.removeChild(e.target);
  e.target.remove();
}

myHeadingLoadEventTrigger.addEventListener('error', updateHeading, false);
<h2>My Heading</h2>
<img id="my-heading-load-event-trigger" src />

| improve this answer | |
  • See: stackoverflow.com/questions/58837574/… – Rounin Nov 13 '19 at 15:16
  • @DavidBradshaw - You'll never believe it, but I think I have actually cracked it. See the Second Attempt, at the top of the answer above. – Rounin Nov 13 '19 at 16:31
  • 1
    @DavidBradshaw - Scratch that. I've come up with a Third Attempt. This is the definitive solution. – Rounin Nov 13 '19 at 17:57
  • Maybe cut the answer down to version 3 – David Bradshaw Nov 14 '19 at 8:02
  • -1 First, an suggestion, use MutationObserver for dom changes. There is no point in running through initialiseParseableElements after you do appendChild, the element is RIGHT THERE. Everything of that element is directly accessible as soon as you do appendChild. Second, the only thing that your 2nd, 3rd attempts demonstrate is grouping supposingly-separated-onload-listeneres-for-each-elements into a updateParseEventTarget. What is the purpose? Third, there is one major logical flaw, lemme continue in next comment. – Valen Aug 15 at 1:02
4

Since the onload event is only supported on a few elements, you have to use an alternate method.

You can use a MutationObserver for this:

const trackElement = element => {
  let present = false;
  const checkIfPresent = () => {
    if (document.body.contains(element)) {
      if (!present) {
        console.log('in DOM:', element);
      }
      present = true;
    } else if (present) {
      present = false;
      console.log('Not in DOM');
    }
  };

  const observer = new MutationObserver(checkIfPresent);
  observer.observe(document.body, { childList: true });
  checkIfPresent();

  return observer;
};

const element = document.querySelector('#element');
const add = () => document.body.appendChild(element);
const remove = () => element.remove();

trackElement(element);
<button onclick="add()">Add</button>
<button onclick="remove()">Remove</button>

<div id="element">Element</div>

| improve this answer | |
2

I really like the YUI3 library for this sort of thing.

<div id="mydiv"> ... </div>

<script>
YUI().use('node-base', function(Y) {
  Y.on("available", someFunction, '#mydiv')
})

See: http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/3/event/#onavailable

| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    That's quite a large blob of JS to dump onto the page for the sake of binding a single onload. – meagar Oct 30 '10 at 4:38
  • 1
    @meagar -- Right, though I'm finding it increasingly rare that I do just two or three simple JS things on a page. Worrying about cross browser compatibility also drives me nuts. – mjhm Oct 30 '10 at 5:19
2

Avoid using any interval based methods and use MutationObserver targeting a parent div of dynamically loaded div for better efficiency.

Here's the simple snippet:

HTML:

<div class="parent-static-div">
  <div class="dynamic-loaded-div">
    this div is loaded after DOM ready event
  </div>
</div>

JS:

var observer = new MutationObserver(function (mutationList, obsrvr) {
  var div_to_check = document.querySelector(".dynamic-loaded-div"); //get div by class
  // var div_to_check = document.getElementById('div-id'); //get div by id

  console.log("checking for div...");
  if (div_to_check) {
    console.log("div is loaded now"); // DO YOUR STUFF!
    obsrvr.disconnect(); // stop observing
    return;
  }
});

var parentElement = document.querySelector("parent-static-div"); // use parent div which is already present in DOM to maximise efficiency
// var parentElement = document // if not sure about parent div then just use whole 'document'

// start observing for dynamic div
observer.observe(parentElement, {
  // for properties details: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/MutationObserverInit
  childList: true,
  subtree: true,
});
| improve this answer | |
0

I am learning javascript and jquery and was going through all the answer, i faced same issue when calling javascript function for loading div element. I tried $('<divid>').ready(function(){alert('test'}) and it worked for me. I want to know is this good way to perform onload call on div element in the way i did using jquery selector.

thanks

| improve this answer | |
0

As all said, you cannot use onLoad event on a DIV instead but it before body tag.

but in case you have one footer file and include it in many pages. it's better to check first if the div you want is on that page displayed, so the code doesn't executed in the pages that doesn't contain that DIV to make it load faster and save some time for your application.

so you will need to give that DIV an ID and do:

var myElem = document.getElementById('myElementId');
if (myElem !== null){ put your code here}
| improve this answer | |
0

I had the same question and was trying to get a Div to load a scroll script, using onload or load. The problem I found was that it would always work before the Div could open, not during or after, so it wouldn't really work.

Then I came up with this as a work around.

<body>

<span onmouseover="window.scrollTo(0, document.body.scrollHeight);" 
onmouseout="window.scrollTo(0, document.body.scrollHeight);">

<div id="">
</div>

<a href="" onclick="window.scrollTo(0, document.body.scrollHeight);">Link to open Div</a>

</span>
</body>

I placed the Div inside a Span and gave the Span two events, a mouseover and a mouseout. Then below that Div, I placed a link to open the Div, and gave that link an event for onclick. All events the exact same, to make the page scroll down to bottom of page. Now when the button to open the Div is clicked, the page will jump down part way, and the Div will open above the button, causing the mouseover and mouseout events to help push the scroll down script. Then any movement of the mouse at that point will push the script one last time.

| improve this answer | |
0

You could use an interval to check for it until it loads like this: https://codepen.io/pager/pen/MBgGGM

let checkonloadDoSomething = setInterval(() => {
  let onloadDoSomething = document.getElementById("onloadDoSomething");
  if (onloadDoSomething) {
    onloadDoSomething.innerHTML="Loaded"
    clearInterval(checkonloadDoSomething);
  } else {`enter code here`
    console.log("Waiting for onloadDoSomething to load");
  }
}, 100);
| improve this answer | |
0

First to answer your question: No, you can't, not directly like you wanted to do so. May be a bit late to answer, but this is my solution, without jQuery, pure javascript. It was originally written to apply a resize function to textareas after DOM is loaded and on keyup.

Same way you could use it to do something with (all) divs or only one, if specified, like so:

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function() {
    var divs = document.querySelectorAll('div'); // all divs
    var mydiv = document.getElementById('myDiv'); // only div#myDiv
    divs.forEach( div => {
        do_something_with_all_divs(div);
    });
    do_something_with_mydiv(mydiv);
});

If you really need to do something with a div, loaded after the DOM is loaded, e.g. after an ajax call, you could use a very helpful hack, which is easy to understand an you'll find it ...working-with-elements-before-the-dom-is-ready.... It says "before the DOM is ready" but it works brillant the same way, after an ajax insertion or js-appendChild-whatever of a div. Here's the code, with some tiny changes to my needs.

css

.loaded { // I use only class loaded instead of a nodename
    animation-name: nodeReady;
    animation-duration: 0.001s;
}

@keyframes nodeReady {  
    from { clip: rect(1px, auto, auto, auto); }
    to { clip: rect(0px, auto, auto, auto); }  
}

javascript

document.addEventListener("animationstart", function(event) {
    var e = event || window.event;
    if (e.animationName == "nodeReady") {
        e.target.classList.remove('loaded');
        do_something_else();
    }
}, false);
| improve this answer | |
0

When you load some html from server and insert it into DOM tree you can use DOMSubtreeModified however it is deprecated - so you can use MutationObserver or just detect new content inside loadElement function directly so you will don't need to wait for DOM events

var ignoreFirst=0;
var observer = (new MutationObserver((m, ob)=>
{
  if(ignoreFirst++>0) {
    console.log('Element add on', new Date());
  }
}
)).observe(content, {childList: true, subtree:true });


// simulate element loading
var tmp=1;
function loadElement(name) {  
  setTimeout(()=>{
    console.log(`Element ${name} loaded`)
    content.innerHTML += `<div>My name is ${name}</div>`; 
  },1500*tmp++)
}; 

loadElement('Michael');
loadElement('Madonna');
loadElement('Shakira');
<div id="content"><div>

| improve this answer | |
0

You can attach an event listener as below. It will trigger whenever the div having selector #my-id loads completely to DOM.

$(document).on('EventName', '#my-id', function() {
 // do something
});

Inthis case EventName may be 'load' or 'click'

https://api.jquery.com/on/#on-events-selector-data-handler

| improve this answer | |
0

we can use all these tags with onload

<body>, <frame>, <frameset>, <iframe>, <img>, <input type="image">, <link>, <script> and <style>

eg:

function loadImage() {
    alert("Image is loaded");
}
<img src="https://www.w3schools.com/tags/w3html.gif" onload="loadImage()" width="100" height="132">

| improve this answer | |
-1

Use the body.onload event instead, either via attribute (<body onload="myFn()"> ...) or by binding an event in Javascript. This is extremely common with jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {
    doSomething($('#myDiv'));
});
| improve this answer | |
  • javascript pure and not jquery, check tag ;) – KingRider Mar 23 '16 at 13:03
-4

You cannot add event onload on div, but you can add onkeydown and trigger onkeydown event on document load

$(function ()
{
  $(".ccsdvCotentPS").trigger("onkeydown");
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.2.3/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div  onkeydown="setCss( );"> </div>`

| improve this answer | |
-4

Try this.

document.getElementById("div").onload = alert("This is a div.");
<div id="div">Hello World</div>

Try this one too. You need to remove . from oQuickReply.swap() to make the function working.

document.getElementById("div").onload = oQuickReplyswap();
function oQuickReplyswap() {
alert("Hello World");
}
<div id="div"></div>

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It seems to work, but it is merely, that alert("This is a div."); is called when this line is executed and the result (which is undefined) is assigned to div.onload. Which is completely pointless. – Frederic Leitenberger Jul 18 '19 at 12:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.