15

I'm trying to couple ES7's async/await with knex.js transactions.

Although I can easily play around with non-transactional code, I'm struggling to get transactions working properly using the aforementioned async/await structure.

I'm using this module to simulate async/await

Here's what I currently have:

Non-transactional version:

works fine but is not transactional

app.js

// assume `db` is a knex instance

app.post("/user", async((req, res) => {
  const data = {
   idUser: 1,
   name: "FooBar"
  }

  try {
    const result = await(user.insert(db, data));
    res.json(result);
  } catch (err) {
    res.status(500).json(err);
  }
}));

user.js

insert: async (function(db, data) {
  // there's no need for this extra call but I'm including it
  // to see example of deeper call stacks if this is answered

  const idUser =  await(this.insertData(db, data));
  return {
    idUser: idUser
  }
}),

insertData: async(function(db, data) {
  // if any of the following 2 fails I should be rolling back

  const id = await(this.setId(db, idCustomer, data));
  const idCustomer = await(this.setData(db, id, data));

  return {
    idCustomer: idCustomer
  }
}),

// DB Functions (wrapped in Promises)

setId: function(db, data) {
  return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
    db.insert(data)
    .into("ids")
    .then((result) => resolve(result)
    .catch((err) => reject(err));
  });
},

setData: function(db, id, data) {
  data.id = id;

  return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
    db.insert(data)
    .into("customers")
    .then((result) => resolve(result)
    .catch((err) => reject(err));
  });
}

Attempt to make it transactional

user.js

// Start transaction from this call

insert: async (function(db, data) {
 const trx = await(knex.transaction());
 const idCustomer =  await(user.insertData(trx, data));

 return {
    idCustomer: idCustomer
  }
}),

it seems that await(knex.transaction()) returns this error:

[TypeError: container is not a function]

10

Async/await is based around promises, so it looks like you'd just need to wrap all the knex methods to return "promise compatible" objects.

Here is a description on how you can convert arbitrary functions to work with promises, so they can work with async/await:

Trying to understand how promisification works with BlueBird

Essentially you want to do this:

var transaction = knex.transaction;
knex.transaction = function(callback){ return knex.transaction(callback); }

This is because "async/await requires the either a function with a single callback argument, or a promise", whereas knex.transaction looks like this:

function transaction(container, config) {
  return client.transaction(container, config);
}

Alternatively, you can create a new async function and use it like this:

async function transaction() {
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
    knex.transaction(function(error, result){
      if (error) {
        reject(error);
      } else {
        resolve(result);
      }
    });
  });
}

// Start transaction from this call

insert: async (function(db, data) {
 const trx = await(transaction());
 const idCustomer =  await(person.insertData(trx, authUser, data));

 return {
    idCustomer: idCustomer
  }
})

This may be useful too: Knex Transaction with Promises

(Also note, I'm not familiar with knex's API, so not sure what the params are passed to knex.transaction, the above ones are just for example).

26

I couldn't find a solid answer for this anywhere (with rollbacks and commits) so here's my solution.

First you need to "Promisify" the knex.transaction function. There are libraries for this, but for a quick example I did this:

const promisify = (fn) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => fn(resolve));

This example creates a blog post and a comment, and rolls back both if there's an error with either.

const trx = await promisify(db.transaction);

try {
  const postId = await trx('blog_posts')
  .insert({ title, body })
  .returning('id'); // returns an array of ids

  const commentId = await trx('comments')
  .insert({ post_id: postId[0], message })
  .returning('id'); 

  await trx.commit();
} catch (e) {
  await trx.rollback();
}
  • 6
    I had to use fn(resolve).catch(reject) for promisifying, otherwise I would get an uncatchable unhandled rejection error on rollback. – Neon Jan 3 '18 at 11:17
  • 1
    Amazing pattern! I was banging my head for the past 24 hours trying to get transactions working in knex and your code makes it so simple. I posted my solution in TypeScript. How did you figure out how to Promisify the transaction? – gomisha Jul 27 '18 at 1:07
  • This is great @sf77, you should write a medium article or something! – paqash Nov 14 '18 at 9:08
  • This doesn't work anymore! transaction is a function that needs to access the db instance. if you pass db.transaction as an argument the function looses the scope. The sanest solution is not to use promisify function and build the promise manually, but for stubborn, something like this might work: const trx = await promisify(db.transaction.bind(knex)); – francescortiz May 24 at 11:05
  • Could you please update your answer to be compatible with current versions of knex? See stackoverflow.com/a/56130889/1552315 – S.B. Jul 4 at 13:20
4

I think I have found a more elegant solution to the problem.

Borrowing from the knex Transaction docs, I will contrast their promise-style with the async/await-style that worked for me.

Promise Style

var Promise = require('bluebird');

// Using trx as a transaction object:
knex.transaction(function(trx) {

  var books = [
    {title: 'Canterbury Tales'},
    {title: 'Moby Dick'},
    {title: 'Hamlet'}
  ];

  knex.insert({name: 'Old Books'}, 'id')
    .into('catalogues')
    .transacting(trx)
    .then(function(ids) {
      return Promise.map(books, function(book) {
        book.catalogue_id = ids[0];

        // Some validation could take place here.

        return knex.insert(book).into('books').transacting(trx);
      });
    })
    .then(trx.commit)
    .catch(trx.rollback);
})
.then(function(inserts) {
  console.log(inserts.length + ' new books saved.');
})
.catch(function(error) {
  // If we get here, that means that neither the 'Old Books' catalogues insert,
  // nor any of the books inserts will have taken place.
  console.error(error);
});

async/await style

var Promise = require('bluebird'); // import Promise.map()

// assuming knex.transaction() is being called within an async function
const inserts = await knex.transaction(async function(trx) {

  var books = [
    {title: 'Canterbury Tales'},
    {title: 'Moby Dick'},
    {title: 'Hamlet'}
  ];

  const ids = await knex.insert({name: 'Old Books'}, 'id')
    .into('catalogues')
    .transacting(trx);

  const inserts = await Promise.map(books, function(book) {
        book.catalogue_id = ids[0];

        // Some validation could take place here.

        return knex.insert(book).into('books').transacting(trx);
      });
    })
  await trx.commit(inserts); // whatever gets passed to trx.commit() is what the knex.transaction() promise resolves to.
})

The docs state:

Throwing an error directly from the transaction handler function automatically rolls back the transaction, same as returning a rejected promise.

It seems that the transaction callback function is expected to return either nothing or a Promise. Declaring the callback as an async function means that it returns a Promise.

One advantage of this style is that you don't have to call the rollback manually. Returning a rejected Promise will trigger the rollback automatically.

Make sure to pass any results you want to use elsewhere to the final trx.commit() call.

I have tested this pattern in my own work and it works as expected.

3

Adding to sf77's excellent answer, I implemented this pattern in TypeScript for adding a new user where you need to do the following in 1 transaction:

  1. creating a user record in the USER table
  2. creating a login record in the LOGIN table

public async addUser(user: User, hash: string): Promise<User> {

	//transform knex transaction such that can be used with async-await
	const promisify = (fn: any) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => fn(resolve));
	const trx: knex.Transaction  = <knex.Transaction> await promisify(db.transaction);

	try {
		let users: User [] = await trx
			.insert({
				name: user.name,
				email: user.email,
				joined: new Date()})
			.into(config.DB_TABLE_USER)
			.returning("*")

		await trx
			.insert({
				email: user.email,
				hash
			}).into(config.DB_TABLE_LOGIN)
			.returning("email")
		await trx.commit();
		return Promise.resolve(users[0]);
	}
	catch(error) { 
		await trx.rollback;
		return Promise.reject("Error adding user: " + error) 
	}
}

  • 1
    This works for me, expect for the promisify part, which throws "transaction" from undefined error. Change that line to const promisify = () => new Promise((resolve, reject) => db.transaction(resolve)); where the db is the knex connection, and now it works. – cankentcode Feb 13 at 10:04
1

For those who come in 2019.

After I updated Knex to version 0.16.5. sf77's answer doesn't work anymore due to the change in Knex's transaction function:

transaction(container, config) {
  const trx = this.client.transaction(container, config);
  trx.userParams = this.userParams;
  return trx;
}

Solution

Keep sf77's promisify function:

const promisify = (fn) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => fn(resolve));

Update trx

from

const trx = await promisify(db.transaction);

to

const trx =  await promisify(db.transaction.bind(db));
  • That worked for me. I hope sf77 updates their answer. – S.B. Jul 4 at 13:20
  • Glad that it worked for you. – Peter Vu Jul 5 at 9:31

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