0

You have a list of lists in Python, something like this:

l = [[ 1,  2,  3],
     [18, 20, 22],
     [ 3, 14, 16],
     [ 1,  3, 05],
     [18,  2, 16]]

How would you go about selecting one value from each sub-list, such that no single value is repeated, and the sum of the resulting list is minimised?

result = [1, 18, 3, 5, 2]
5
  • 2
    Assuming all are positive: pick the minimum in each sublist. If any element is duplicated, pick the smallest number from both the corresponding sublists that is not the same as the duplicated element. Look up min(). Nov 14 '16 at 8:30
  • 1
    Good answer from @AkshatMahajan, but your question should be related to an actual piece of code. Have you at least tried to do something?
    – Right leg
    Nov 14 '16 at 8:32
  • I assume you're using Python 2. Python 3 raises SyntaxError: invalid token for integer literals with leading zeros.
    – PM 2Ring
    Nov 14 '16 at 8:42
  • I added the zeros for readability's sake without checking. Using spaces now instead. Nov 14 '16 at 8:44
  • FWIW, I've added a faster version (and some timing code to my answer).
    – PM 2Ring
    Nov 15 '16 at 5:46
2

Here's a compact brute-force solution, so it has to perform columns**rows tests, which is not good. I suspect that there's a backtracking algorithm that's generally more efficient, but in the worst case all possibilities may need to be checked.

from itertools import product

lst = [
    [ 1,  2,  3],
    [18, 20, 22],
    [ 3, 14, 16],
    [ 1,  3,  5],
    [18,  2, 16],
]

nrows = len(lst) 
m = min((t for t in product(*lst) if len(set(t)) == nrows), key=sum)
print(m)

output

(1, 18, 3, 5, 2)

Here's a faster version that uses a recursive generator instead of itertools.product.

def select(data, seq):
    if data:
        for seq in select(data[:-1], seq):
            for u in data[-1]:
                if u not in seq:
                    yield seq + [u]
    else:
        yield seq

def solve(data):
    return min(select(data, []), key=sum)

Here's a modified version of the recursive generator that sorts as it goes, but of course that's slower, and it consumes more RAM. If the input data is sorted it usually finds the minimum solution quite rapidly, but I can't figure out a foolproof way of getting it to stop when it's found the minimum selection.

def select(data, selected):
    if data:
        for selected in sorted(select(data[:-1], selected), key=sum):
            for u in data[-1]:
                if u not in selected:
                    yield selected + [u]
    else:
        yield selected

Here's some timing code that compares the speed of Maurice's and my solutions. It runs on Python 2 and Python 3. I get similar time results on Python 2.6 & Python 3.6 on my old 2GHz 32 bit machine running an oldish Debian derivative of Linux.

from __future__ import print_function, division
from timeit import Timer
from itertools import product
from random import seed, sample, randrange

n = randrange(0, 1 << 32)
print('seed', n)
seed(n)

def show(data):
    indent = ' ' * 4
    s = '\n'.join(['{0}{1},'.format(indent, row) for row in data])
    print('[\n{0}\n]\n'.format(s))

def make_data(rows, cols):
    maxn = rows * cols
    nums = range(1, maxn)
    return [sample(nums, cols) for _ in range(rows)]

def sort_data(data):
    newdata = [sorted(row) for row in data]
    newdata.sort(reverse=True, key=sum)
    return newdata

# - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

def solve_Maurice(data):
    result = None
    for item in product(*data):
        if len(item) > len(set(item)):
            # Try the next combination if there are duplicates
            continue
        if result is None or sum(result) > sum(item):
            result = item
    return result

def solve_prodgen(data):
    rows = len(data) 
    return min((t for t in product(*data) if len(set(t)) == rows), key=sum)

def select(data, seq):
    if data:
        for seq in select(data[:-1], seq):
            for u in data[-1]:
                if u not in seq:
                    yield seq + [u]
    else:
        yield seq

def solve_recgen(data):
    return min(select(data, []), key=sum)

funcs = (
    solve_Maurice,
    solve_prodgen,
    solve_recgen,
)

# - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

def verify():
    for func in funcs:
        fname = func.__name__
        seq = func(data)
        print('{0:14} {1}'.format(fname, seq))
    print()

def time_test(loops, reps):
    ''' Print timing stats for all the functions '''
    timings = []
    for func in funcs:
        fname = func.__name__
        setup = 'from __main__ import data, ' + fname
        cmd = fname + '(data)'
        t = Timer(cmd, setup)
        result = t.repeat(reps, loops)
        result.sort()
        timings.append((result, fname))

    timings.sort()
    for result, fname in timings:
        print('{0:14} {1}'.format(fname, result))

rows, cols = 6, 4
print('Number of selections:', cols ** rows)

data = make_data(rows, cols)
data = sort_data(data)
show(data)

verify()

loops, reps = 100, 3
time_test(loops, reps)

typical output

seed 22290
Number of selections: 4096
[
    [6, 11, 22, 23],
    [9, 14, 17, 19],
    [5, 9, 16, 22],
    [5, 6, 9, 13],
    [1, 3, 6, 22],
    [4, 5, 6, 13],
]

solve_Maurice  (11, 9, 5, 6, 1, 4)
solve_prodgen  (11, 9, 5, 6, 1, 4)
solve_recgen   [11, 9, 5, 6, 1, 4]

solve_recgen   [0.5476037560001714, 0.549133045002236, 0.5647858490046929]
solve_prodgen  [1.2500368960027117, 1.296529343999282, 1.3022710209988873]
solve_Maurice  [1.485518219997175, 1.489505891004228, 1.784105566002836]
1

EDIT: My previous solution only works in most cases, this should do the trick in all cases:

from itertools import product
l = [[1, 2, 3], [18, 20, 22], [3, 14, 16], [1, 3, 5], [18, 2, 16]]

result = None
for item in product(*l):
    if len(item) > len(set(item)):
        # Try the next combination if there are duplicates
        continue
    if result is None or sum(result) > sum(item):
        result = item
print(result)

Output

(1, 18, 3, 5, 2)
5
  • You could make this a nested list comprehension, no need for the extra for i in l dangling outside. Nov 14 '16 at 8:34
  • @AkshatMahajan List comprehension might make the code more confusing, especially in that case IMO
    – Right leg
    Nov 14 '16 at 8:35
  • [[1,2,3], [1, 18, 19]] Doesn't work with your solution as well. One way could be doing your method for every sorting possible of the list of lists. But this is crappy complexity as well
    – Alburkerk
    Nov 14 '16 at 8:45
  • @PM2Ring and Alburkerk are right, I added another solution, that basically tries all combinations - less simple, but it should work now.
    – Maurice
    Nov 14 '16 at 9:04
  • Yes, your new code is correct. I've been trying to find a smarter algorithm that knows when to stop searching, but so far I haven't had much luck. FWIW, I've added a new version and some timing code to my answer.
    – PM 2Ring
    Nov 15 '16 at 5:50

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