Given matrix m:

      # [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
 # [1,]    2    1    3    4
 # [2,]    4    3    2    1
 # [3,]    2    3    1    4
 # [4,]    1    2    3    4
 # [5,]    4    2    3    1
 # [6,]    4    3    1    2
 # [7,]    2    4    3    1
 # [8,]    4    3    2    1
 # [9,]    3    2    1    4
# [10,]    1    2    3    4
# [11,]    3    2    4    1
# [12,]    4    3    2    1
# [13,]    2    1    3    4
# [14,]    2    1    3    4
# [15,]    1    2    3    4
# [16,]    4    3    2    1
# [17,]    2    1    3    4
# [18,]    1    4    3    2
# [19,]    3    2    1    4
# [20,]    1    2    3    4

m <- structure(c(2L, 4L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 2L, 4L, 3L, 1L, 3L, 4L, 2L, 
2L, 1L, 4L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 3L, 3L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 3L, 2L, 
2L, 2L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 1L, 4L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 3L, 
1L, 3L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 4L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 1L, 3L, 4L, 
1L, 4L, 4L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 1L, 4L, 
2L, 4L, 4L), .Dim = c(20L, 4L))

We can extract sorted rows in this way:

apply(m, 1, function(x) !is.unsorted(x) | !is.unsorted(rev(x)))

#[1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE 
#FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

It's OK if matrix is not large. But I'm talking about matrix with millions rows. Can we do better? Can we do it in a vectorized way? Matrix m is given just as a toy data. I'm looking for a general solution.

  • Is your need for vectorisation performance driven? If so, is your real data really long, really wide or just generally big (it might help work out what differences in timing matter). – sebastian-c Nov 14 '16 at 10:54
  • 5
    Using || instead of | reduced the run time to ~60% in a test with 1 million rows on my machine – docendo discimus Nov 14 '16 at 11:09
  • @docendodiscimus - clever - though I'm surprised that makes such a difference. I guess it pays to be explicit when you can! – thelatemail Nov 14 '16 at 11:15
  • It's about using short-circuit logic, it means that the computer doesn't test the second condition if the first condition is true. – stephematician Nov 14 '16 at 11:20
  • 1
    If you loop, you should always restrict it, so that only those steps that need to be looped are done inside the loop. If you have sufficient RAM, you can do m1 <- m[, rev(seq_len(ncol(m)))] outside the loop and avoid calling rev for each row. – Roland Nov 14 '16 at 11:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's ugly, but you could get there by checking if all the differences in each column are negative or positive.

colSums(sign(diff(t(m)))) %in% c(-3,3)
# [1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
#[13] FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

My quick testing suggests it is a lot faster to execute.

You can generalize it by just checking against the size of the matrix m:

colSums(sign(diff(t(m)))) %in% c(-(ncol(m)-1), ncol(m)-1)

In the case that you have sorted rows like c(1,1,2,3) which have repeated values, you can use a slightly more long-winded approach:

sdm <- diff(t(m))
nc <- ncol(m) - 1
colSums(sdm <= 0)==nc | colSums(sdm >= 0)==nc
# [1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
#[13] FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

Some quick benchmarking (keeping in mind these aren't all identical in terms of coping with repeated values):

set.seed(1)
m2 <- m[sample(1:nrow(m),1e6,replace=T),]

## original apply code
system.time({
  apply(m2, 1, function(x) !is.unsorted(x) | !is.unsorted(rev(x)))
})
#   user  system elapsed 
# 14.888   0.272  15.153

And the comparison runs:

system.time({
  n <- t(m2)
  forwards <- colSums(n == sort(m2[1,])) == ncol(m2)
  backwards  <- colSums(n == rev(sort(m2[1,]))) == ncol(m2)
  vec <- forwards | backwards
})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.104   0.020   0.123

system.time({
  sdm <- diff(t(m2))
  nc <- ncol(m) - 1
  colSums(sdm <= 0)==nc | colSums(sdm >= 0)==nc
})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.248   0.032   0.279

system.time({
  apply(m2[,-1] - m2[,-ncol(m2)], 1, function(x) all(x>=0) || all(x <= 0))
})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  3.724   0.004   3.731

library(matrixStats)
system.time(rowVarDiffs(m2) == 0)
#   user  system elapsed 
# 40.176   1.156  42.071 
  • @989 - see edits – thelatemail Nov 14 '16 at 11:12
  • 1
    or slightly modified abs(colSums(sign(diff(t(m))))) %in% (ncol(m)-1L) – docendo discimus Nov 14 '16 at 11:13
  • @Sotos - true... fixed now – thelatemail Nov 14 '16 at 11:22

I went for a recycling approach:

n <- t(m)

forwards <- colSums(n == sort(m[1,])) == ncol(m)
backwards  <- colSums(n == rev(sort(m[1,]))) == ncol(m)

vec <- forwards | backwards
unvec <- apply(m, 1, function(x) !is.unsorted(x) | !is.unsorted(rev(x)))

identical(vec, unvec)
[1] TRUE
  • You could generalise it (sort the first row instead of using c(1,2,3,4) and use ncol(m)). It assumes that the rows all have the same elements to sort. I'll make those changes – sebastian-c Nov 14 '16 at 11:09
  • It does work ONLY if matrix' rows are of the same numbers. – 989 Nov 14 '16 at 15:19

An idea is that if the rows are sorted, then their diff will be always 1, thus the variance will be 0. Using rowVarDiffs from matrixStats package then,

library(matrixStats)

rowVarDiffs(m) == 0
#or 
rowVarDiffs(rowRanks(m)) == 0


#[1] FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
  • 2
    Good idea. You've made the same assumption I have. Though now I am thinking that c(1,1,2,3) is still sorted. I can't think of a clear vectorized solution to solve that issue. I will wait to see what OP reckons. – thelatemail Nov 14 '16 at 11:14
  • yup, was just thinking about this case. – Sotos Nov 14 '16 at 11:16
  • Just had a go at it in an edit to my answer. – thelatemail Nov 14 '16 at 11:23
  • @thelatemail yes, that will work – Sotos Nov 14 '16 at 11:30

Best answer I got was to check that all the differences between elements (in a row) are non-negative or all non-positive (borrowing from the colSums answer above, I was just testing the same approach when I was beaten to it!)

system.time({
    dm2 <- m2[,-1] - m2[,-ncol(m2)]
    vec <- rowSums(dm2>=0) == (ncol(m2)-1) |
           rowSums(dm2<=0) == (ncol(m2)-1) 
})

This will work for any numeric values (integer or non-integer) with any spacing.

On a matrix with one million rows I got:

   user  system elapsed 
   0.11    0.00    0.11

Compared to the OP:

   user  system elapsed 
   8.98    0.00    8.98
  • oops - typo - was using the data similar to thelatemails comment btw – stephematician Nov 14 '16 at 21:38
  • right - thanks - i thought it was just the typo from copying over the code, turns out diff didn't do what I thought it did. it works now. – stephematician Nov 14 '16 at 22:39

Here is a benchmarking over the proposed solutions for a matrix of dim 1e+5 x 4 constructed from matrix m in the original question. Please note that matrix m have the same numbers per row and it does not have any repeated number per row.

It is important to note that only the following solutions are the generalized solutions which means they work for any integer matrix even with repeated numbers per row:

  • f_m0h3n
  • f_thelatemail2
  • f_stephematician
  • f_Chirayu_Chamoli

That is, they do work for the following matrix whereas other solutions fail!

m <- structure(c(18, 1, 7, 1, 2, 12, 9, 6, 18, 20, 7, 2, 12, 13, 19, 
7, 20, 6, 5, 19, 17, 2, 2, 4, 5, 9, 18, 13, 9, 18, 1, 11, 13, 
7, 18, 10, 20, 2, 3, 3, 14, 8, 19, 8, 12, 7, 19, 16, 12, 16, 
17, 19, 7, 13, 15, 6, 18, 15, 2, 18, 9, 14, 8, 14, 15, 6, 13, 
18, 3, 10, 9, 5, 5, 9, 10, 6, 11, 17, 12, 15, 7, 15, 17, 15, 
16, 19, 3, 14, 2, 9, 4, 19, 14, 14, 7, 3, 10, 11, 18, 12, 3, 
18, 9, 18, 20, 12, 18, 10, 4, 7, 5, 2, 12, 11, 3, 4, 3, 7, 18, 
10), .Dim = c(20L, 6L))

set.seed(1)
library(matrixStats)
library(microbenchmark)
m1 <- structure(c(3, 1, 3, 3, 1, 5, 1, 5, 3, 5, 1, 3, 5, 3, 1, 3, 4, 
2, 5, 5, 5, 2, 2, 5, 5, 1, 2, 4, 2, 2, 2, 1, 4, 5, 2, 4, 1, 4, 
4, 3, 4, 3, 5, 2, 4, 2, 4, 3, 4, 4, 3, 5, 1, 1, 3, 5, 5, 1, 3, 
2, 2, 4, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 4, 4, 3, 2, 4, 2, 3, 5, 2, 1, 
1, 5, 4, 4, 3, 4, 5, 1, 5, 3, 5, 2, 2, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 1, 4), .Dim = c(20L, 
5L))
m <- m1[sample(1:nrow(m1),1e5,replace=T),]
dim(m)
#[1] 100000  5
f_m0h3n <- function(m) apply(m, 1, function(x) !is.unsorted(x) || !is.unsorted(rev(x)))

f_thelatemail1 <- function(m) colSums(sign(diff(t(m)))) %in% c(-(ncol(m)-1), ncol(m)-1)
f_thelatemail2 <- function(m) {sdm <- diff(t(m));nc <- ncol(m) - 1;colSums(sdm <= 0)==nc | colSums(sdm >= 0)==nc}

f_sebastian_c <- function(m){n <- t(m);forwards <- colSums(n == sort(m[1,])) == ncol(m);
backwards  <- colSums(n == rev(sort(m[1,]))) == ncol(m);forwards | backwards}

f_Sotos1 <- function(m) rowVarDiffs(m) == 0
f_Sotos2 <- function(m) apply(m, 1, function(i) var(diff(i)) == 0)
f_Sotos3 <- function(m) rowVarDiffs(rowRanks(m)) == 0

f_stephematician <- function(m2)  {dm2 <- m2[,-1] - m2[,-ncol(m2)];
vec <- rowSums(dm2>=0) == (ncol(m2)-1) | rowSums(dm2<=0) == (ncol(m2)-1);vec}

f_Chirayu_Chamoli <- function(m) {i=apply(m, 1, is.unsorted);j=apply(m[,c(ncol(m):1),drop = FALSE], 1, is.unsorted);k=xor(i,j);k}

res <- f_m0h3n(m)
all(res==f_thelatemail1(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_thelatemail2(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_sebastian_c(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_Sotos1(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_Sotos2(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_Sotos3(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_stephematician(m))
# [1] TRUE
all(res==f_Chirayu_Chamoli(m))
# [1] TRUE

microbenchmark(f_m0h3n(m), f_thelatemail1(m), f_thelatemail2(m), f_sebastian_c(m), f_Sotos1(m), f_Sotos2(m), f_Sotos3(m), f_stephematician(m), f_Chirayu_Chamoli(m))

# Unit: milliseconds
                 # expr         min          lq        mean     median          uq        max neval
           # f_m0h3n(m)  504.901409  522.640977  542.398387  535.72417  561.723344  634.99808   100
    # f_thelatemail1(m)    9.426029   11.479137   23.454441   13.20548   17.308545   91.18738   100
    # f_thelatemail2(m)    8.841014   10.607174   25.820464   12.09675   17.740771  103.00244   100
     # f_sebastian_c(m)    5.358874    5.975436    9.709314    6.66186    8.725784   77.40695   100
          # f_Sotos1(m) 1526.461296 1604.177128 1639.571861 1644.11763 1669.721992 1752.77551   100
          # f_Sotos2(m) 1772.076169 1850.762817 1889.386328 1891.78832 1917.528489 2047.85548   100
          # f_Sotos3(m) 1538.428094 1600.285447 1637.314434 1644.03891 1671.703437 1738.84665   100
  # f_stephematician(m)    8.994555    9.986554   15.098616   10.97570   12.217240   83.86915   100
 # f_Chirayu_Chamoli(m)  273.571757  289.372545  321.199457  330.37146  346.979005  384.64962   100
  • @Sotos Why it performed this bad? – 989 Nov 14 '16 at 13:31
  • no idea. In my mind I connected it with rowSums type of function and thought that it would be more efficient than any apply procedure. Turns out it is, but overall....not that efficient...oh well...win some lose some – Sotos Nov 14 '16 at 13:59
  • @Sotos Even with the initial m of dim 20x4, it does not perform better than apply. Mean of 130.52451 for apply and 374.44257 for your solution. – 989 Nov 14 '16 at 14:04
  • When I say apply procedure I mean the corresponding of mine (i.e. apply(m, 1, function(i) var(diff(i)) == 0))). I also did not test it before posting. I thought the idea of zero variance would take care of it – Sotos Nov 14 '16 at 14:06
  • 1
    Anyway, no problem. Just Monday... have a good evening – Sotos Nov 14 '16 at 14:58

Here is another simple thing you could do. I think this is generalized enough but speed wise, it is not close to the vectorized solution by latemail.

i=apply(m, 1, is.unsorted)
j=apply(m[,c(ncol(m):1),drop = FALSE], 1, is.unsorted)
k=xor(i,j)

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