193

I would like to use async/await with some filesystem operations. Normally async/await works fine because I use babel-plugin-syntax-async-functions.

But with this code I run into the if case where names is undefined:

import fs from 'fs';

async function myF() {
  let names;
  try {
    names = await fs.readdir('path/to/dir');
  } catch (e) {
    console.log('e', e);
  }
  if (names === undefined) {
    console.log('undefined');
  } else {
    console.log('First Name', names[0]);
  }
}

myF();

When I rebuild the code into the callback hell version everything is OK and I get the filenames. Thanks for your hints.

11 Answers 11

188

Native support for async await fs functions since Node 11

Since Node.JS 11.0.0 (stable), and version 10.0.0 (experimental), you have access to file system methods that are already promisify'd and you can use them with try catch exception handling rather than checking if the callback's returned value contains an error.

The API is very clean and elegant! Simply use .promises member of fs object:

import fs from 'fs';
const fsPromises = fs.promises;

async function listDir() {
  try {
    return fsPromises.readdir('path/to/dir');
  } catch (err) {
    console.error('Error occured while reading directory!', err);
  }
}

listDir();
6
  • This API is stable as of version 11.x per the File System documentation on the Node.js site
    – TheHanna
    Jun 10, 2019 at 15:07
  • 9
    @DanStarns if you don't return await your promise, the catch block is of no use...I thinj it is sometimes a good practice to await before returning
    – TOPKAT
    Feb 11, 2020 at 13:47
  • 1
    @538ROMEO just looked into this & your right. Thanks for pointing it out.
    – Dan Starns
    Feb 11, 2020 at 20:56
  • Documentation for these alternative methods: nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_promises_api Apr 17, 2020 at 23:11
  • 2
    i like doing import { promises as fs } from 'fs'; Oct 19, 2021 at 6:10
174

Starting with node 8.0.0, you can use this:

const fs = require('fs');
const util = require('util');

const readdir = util.promisify(fs.readdir);

async function myF() {
  let names;
  try {
    names = await readdir('path/to/dir');
  } catch (err) {
    console.log(err);
  }
  if (names === undefined) {
    console.log('undefined');
  } else {
    console.log('First Name', names[0]);
  }
}

myF();

See https://nodejs.org/dist/latest-v8.x/docs/api/util.html#util_util_promisify_original

7
  • 7
    In node v8.9.4, got a SyntaxError: Unexpected token import error message. does node8 supports import token by default?
    – makerj
    Jan 21, 2018 at 10:26
  • 9
    @makerj he's using the new import syntax. It currently requires some transpiling. Would be ok to also use const fs = require('fs') or const { promisify } = require('util') Jan 26, 2018 at 9:20
  • 2
    Noob question, but what's the {err, names} = function syntax called?
    – Qasim
    Mar 4, 2018 at 16:56
  • 7
    @Qasim it is called destructuring assignment. Mar 5, 2018 at 18:27
  • 1
    @AlexanderZeitler That may be true. I haven't looked to see if that is actually a correct use of destructuring. In the case of async await I think you would just do names = await readdir('path/to/dir'); and if there is an err handle it in the catch block. Either way, the name of the syntax is destructuring assignment which was just in response to Qasim's question. May 11, 2018 at 15:17
108

Node.js 8.0.0

Native async / await

Promisify

From this version, you can use native Node.js function from util library.

const fs = require('fs')
const { promisify } = require('util')

const readFileAsync = promisify(fs.readFile)
const writeFileAsync = promisify(fs.writeFile)

const run = async () => {
  const res = await readFileAsync('./data.json')
  console.log(res)
}

run()


Promise Wrapping

const fs = require('fs')

const readFile = (path, opts = 'utf8') =>
  new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.readFile(path, opts, (err, data) => {
      if (err) reject(err)
      else resolve(data)
    })
  })

const writeFile = (path, data, opts = 'utf8') =>
  new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.writeFile(path, data, opts, (err) => {
      if (err) reject(err)
      else resolve()
    })
  })

module.exports = {
  readFile,
  writeFile
}

...


// in some file, with imported functions above
// in async block
const run = async () => {
  const res = await readFile('./data.json')
  console.log(res)
}

run()

Advice

Always use try..catch for await blocks, if you don't want to rethrow exception upper.

5
  • This is strange. I am getting SyntaxError: await is only valid in async function... crying in rage.
    – Amiga500
    Jul 20, 2018 at 12:48
  • 2
    @VedranMaricevic. look at comments, await must be always in async block :)
    – dimpiax
    Jul 20, 2018 at 14:20
  • @VedranMaricevic. You need to call that const res = await readFile('data.json') console.log(res) in some async function
    – Jayraj
    Feb 19, 2019 at 7:58
  • promise wrapping fs.promises and using it with async/await is so confusing to me
    – oldboy
    Oct 28, 2019 at 0:48
  • @PrimitiveNom Promise can be used in traditional way within then, catch etc. Where are async/await is modern behavior flow.
    – dimpiax
    Oct 28, 2019 at 0:54
70
+400

As of v10.0, you can use fs.Promises

Example using readdir

const { promises: fs } = require("fs");

async function myF() {
    let names;
    try {
        names = await fs.readdir("path/to/dir");
    } catch (e) {
        console.log("e", e);
    }
    if (names === undefined) {
        console.log("undefined");
    } else {
        console.log("First Name", names[0]);
    }
}

myF();

Example using readFile

const { promises: fs } = require("fs");

async function getContent(filePath, encoding = "utf-8") {
    if (!filePath) {
        throw new Error("filePath required");
    }

    return fs.readFile(filePath, { encoding });
}

(async () => {
    const content = await getContent("./package.json");

    console.log(content);
})();
8
  • 1
    Works great, but important to note the open issue regarding the ExperimentalWarning: The fs.promises API is experimental warning: github.com/pnpm/pnpm/issues/1178
    – DavidP
    Oct 12, 2019 at 10:31
  • 2
    @DavidP what version of node are you using? 12 and above works fine
    – Dan Starns
    Oct 12, 2019 at 10:58
  • 3
    Yes! Absolutely correct - I neglected to state version I am on: v10.15.3 - it's possible to suppress the message. However, with the issue still open I thought it worth mentioning.
    – DavidP
    Oct 12, 2019 at 11:07
  • 1
    @DavidP I mean it is worth a mention don't get me wrong, but node 12 is in LTS now so it's not a Biggie.
    – Dan Starns
    Oct 12, 2019 at 11:52
  • 1
    In TypeScript (and modern JavaScript?) you can write import { promises as fs } from "fs";. Dec 26, 2020 at 19:45
48

You might produce the wrong behavior because the File-Api fs.readdir does not return a promise. It only takes a callback. If you want to go with the async-await syntax you could 'promisify' the function like this:

function readdirAsync(path) {
  return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
    fs.readdir(path, function (error, result) {
      if (error) {
        reject(error);
      } else {
        resolve(result);
      }
    });
  });
}

and call it instead:

names = await readdirAsync('path/to/dir');
2
  • I'm getting a weird response like this... Buffer(18524) [60, 115, 99, 114, 105, 112, 116, 32, 116, 110, 116, 45, 108, 105, 98, 62, 13, 10, 32, 32, 32, 32, 47, 42, 42, 13, 10, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 42, 32, 67, 111, 112, 121, 114, 105, 103, 104, 116, 32, 63, 32, 50, 48, 50, 48, 32, 68, 101, 115, 105, 103, 110, 32, 65 …] Nov 27, 2020 at 18:29
  • 1
    Use Buffer.toString method. Mar 24, 2021 at 19:29
19

This is the TypeScript version to the question. It is usable after Node 11.0:

import { promises as fs } from 'fs';

async function loadMonoCounter() {
    const data = await fs.readFile('monolitic.txt', 'binary');
    return Buffer.from(data);
}
13

Node v14.0.0 and above

you can just do:

import { readdir } from "fs/promises";

just like you would import from "fs"

see this PR for more details: https://github.com/nodejs/node/pull/31553

7
+200

I have this little helping module that exports promisified versions of fs functions

const fs = require("fs");
const {promisify} = require("util")

module.exports = {
  readdir: promisify(fs.readdir),
  readFile: promisify(fs.readFile),
  writeFile: promisify(fs.writeFile)
  // etc...
};
5

Here is what worked for me:

const fsp = require('fs-promise');

(async () => {
  try {
    const names = await fsp.readdir('path/to/dir');
    console.log(names[0]);
  } catch (e) {
    console.log('error: ', e);
  }
})();

This code works in node 7.6 without babel when harmony flag is enabled: node --harmony my-script.js. And starting with node 7.7, you don't even need this flag!

The fsp library included in the beginning is just a promisified wrapper for fs (and fs-ext).

I’m really exited about what you can do in node without babel these days! Native async/await make writing code such a pleasure!

UPDATE 2017-06: fs-promise module was deprecated. Use fs-extra instead with the same API.

1
  • Downloading a library for this is pure overkill, dependency bloating is something that the community should be strongly against, infact a new npmjs should come into making that only has libs with 0 dependencies
    – PirateApp
    Dec 28, 2017 at 7:12
5

Recommend using an npm package such as https://github.com/davetemplin/async-file, as compared to custom functions. For example:

import * as fs from 'async-file';

await fs.rename('/tmp/hello', '/tmp/world');
await fs.appendFile('message.txt', 'data to append');
await fs.access('/etc/passd', fs.constants.R_OK | fs.constants.W_OK);

var stats = await fs.stat('/tmp/hello', '/tmp/world');

Other answers are outdated

0

You can use the simple and lightweight module https://github.com/nacholibre/nwc-l it supports both async and sync methods.

Note: this module was created by me.

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