The "as.X" operators usually convert one type to another, but as.integer fails when applied to an array. Is this a bug? This is Microsoft R Open version 3.3 64-bit, and also R Foundation's R 3.3.1 for i686-pc-cygwin (32-bit).

> m <- matrix(rnorm(25), 5)
> m
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]       [,4]       [,5]
[1,] -0.5958330 -0.3139274 -0.4746246  0.2431716 -0.5245235
[2,]  0.5677058  0.1944457 -2.3786936  0.2516587 -0.3541963
[3,]  0.6763564 -1.7285476 -0.5878008 -1.2277048  0.7737145
[4,] -1.4607755 -0.4761012  1.0995414  0.6978072  0.6120277
[5,]  0.8593707  0.2962030  1.1791963 -0.2276658  1.1559314
> m[] <- as.integer(m)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0   -2    0    0
[3,]    0   -1    0   -1    0
[4,]   -1    0    1    0    0
[5,]    0    0    1    0    1
> m[] <- as.character(m)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,] "0"  "0"  "0"  "0"  "0" 
[2,] "0"  "0"  "-2" "0"  "0" 
[3,] "0"  "-1" "0"  "-1" "0" 
[4,] "-1" "0"  "1"  "0"  "0" 
[5,] "0"  "0"  "1"  "0"  "1" 
> m[] <- as.integer(m)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,] "0"  "0"  "0"  "0"  "0" 
[2,] "0"  "0"  "-2" "0"  "0" 
[3,] "0"  "-1" "0"  "-1" "0" 
[4,] "-1" "0"  "1"  "0"  "0" 
[5,] "0"  "0"  "1"  "0"  "1" 
  • 4
    If you assign to a subset of a matrix or vector the type of the matrix/vector can only change to a higher (more general) type. – Roland Nov 14 '16 at 20:13
  • ...in particular, m[] <- as.integer(m) works as you expect, I think. – joran Nov 14 '16 at 20:15
  • @joran: m[] <- as.integer(m) does not work as I expected. See the code I already posted. – Phil Goetz Nov 14 '16 at 20:19
  • It does work (and I did read your code), depending on the order it is run. My point was that the as.integer conversion works directly from real, but not after you've converted it to character. – joran Nov 14 '16 at 20:21
  • @Roland: Do you know the reasoning behind that? as.integer will convert individual values or vectors from character to integer. BTW, you could submit that comment as an answer. – Phil Goetz Nov 14 '16 at 20:22
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The documentation states:

When an index expression appears on the left side of an assignment (known as subassignment) then that part of x is set to the value of the right hand side of the assignment. In this case no partial matching of character indices is done, and the left-hand-side is coerced as needed to accept the values. For vectors, the answer will be of the higher of the types of x and value in the hierarchy raw < logical < integer < double < complex < character < list < expression.

The behavior you see with subassignment on the left is consistent with that documented behavior.

Note that even though as.integer "works" in this case when directly applied to a double matrix, it still follows the type hierarchy and only rounds:

> m <- matrix(rnorm(25), 5)
> str(m)
 num [1:5, 1:5] 1.3807 -0.0858 1.4478 0.9509 0.6397 ...
> typeof(m)
[1] "double"
> m[] <- as.integer(m)
> str(m)
 num [1:5, 1:5] 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 -1 -1 ...
> typeof(m)
[1] "double"

Finally, as.integer often does not convert characters to valid integers:

> str(as.integer("a"))
 int NA
Warning message:
In str(as.integer("a")) : NAs introduced by coercion

...except that it results in the integer flavor of NA, namely NA_integer_. But it will convert characters to integers, as long as there is no subassignment:

> str(as.integer("1"))
 int 1

To address the comment about vectors, the documented behavior is the same on regular vectors:

> x <- rnorm(5)
> x[] <- as.character(x)
> x
[1] "0.687551073804054"  "-1.17843752343875"  "0.144747745284427"  "-0.931480738737143" "0.394279275668583" 
> x[] <- as.integer(x)
> x
[1] "0"  "-1" "0"  "0"  "0" 
  • I was about to write the exact same answer, with the same quotation from the doc! – nicola Nov 14 '16 at 20:34
  • Try x = as.character(1:9); x; as.integer(x) – Phil Goetz Nov 14 '16 at 21:00
  • That documentation doesn't apply here. First, the documentation is about vectors, and as.integer acts as I expect it to on vectors, converting characters to integers. Second, it's about implicit coercion, not about explicit conversion, which is what as.integer is supposed to do. – Phil Goetz Nov 14 '16 at 21:02
  • 3
    @PhilGoetz I really am struggling to figure out how else to explain this, because you really seem to not be picking up on the difference between running as.integer(x) and not assigning it to anything versus assigning to the same object with empty brackets x[] <- .... Those are two different operations and are handled differently. – joran Nov 14 '16 at 22:40
  • 1
    @PhilGoetz No worries. We've all had days like that. – joran Nov 15 '16 at 0:34

If you do want to "downcast" a matrix you might be interested in storage.mode()<-:

> m <- matrix(1:4,2)
> m
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    3
[2,]    2    4
> storage.mode(m) <- "character"
> m
     [,1] [,2]
[1,] "1"  "3" 
[2,] "2"  "4" 
> storage.mode(m) <- "integer"
> m
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    3
[2,]    2    4

Joran's answer gives the rule which causes this behavior. The reason for this rule is that a subassignment sometimes does and sometimes doesn't operate on the entire data structure. In cases when it does, it can't convert an entire vector or matrix's datatype. In the case of m[] = ..., it could, but it's better to behave the same way in all cases. Otherwise, it would introduce bugs in cases where a subassignment by indices just happened to cover an entire vector or matrix.

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