43

How to make the hardware beep sound with c++?

1

12 Answers 12

74

Print the special character ASCII BEL (code 7)

cout << '\a';

Source

3
  • This comes out of speakers. How can I make the internal motherboard make a beep instead of speaker? Jan 28, 2016 at 11:22
  • That depends on the operating system. Old MS-DOS triggered a motherboard sound with that. If you are running a very recent OS I expect the kernel to trigger an audio signal from speaker rather than using hardware Jan 28, 2016 at 13:43
  • 4
    this is not working I tried full volume, my g++ version is g++ (Ubuntu 9.3.0-10ubuntu2) 9.3.0 Sep 23, 2020 at 12:18
67

If you're using Windows OS then there is a function called Beep()

#include <iostream> 
#include <windows.h> // WinApi header 

using namespace std;

int main() 
{ 
    Beep(523,500); // 523 hertz (C5) for 500 milliseconds     
    cin.get(); // wait 
    return 0; 
}

Source: http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread15252.html

For Linux based OS there is:

echo -e "\007" >/dev/tty10

And if you do not wish to use Beep() in windows you can do:

echo "^G"

Source: http://www.frank-buss.de/beep/index.html

2
  • For the last one, this does NOT work when I enter ^ and G. It only works when pressing Ctrl+G. Even though the strings look the same when entered, they are different and are also printed differently. Jul 16, 2019 at 12:03
  • Beep() function plays sound via speakers, not through motherboard's physical buzzer. According to microsoft website : "because of the lack of hardware to communicate with, support for Beep was dropped in Windows Vista and Windows XP 64-Bit Edition. In Windows 7, Beep was rewritten to pass the beep to the default sound device for the session"
    – 0xB00B
    Jun 22, 2021 at 15:49
8

There are a few OS-specific routines for beeping.

  • On a Unix-like OS, try the (n)curses beep() function. This is likely to be more portable than writing '\a' as others have suggested, although for most terminal emulators that will probably work.

  • In some *BSDs there is a PC speaker device. Reading the driver source, the SPKRTONE ioctl seems to correspond to the raw hardware interface, but there also seems to be a high-level language built around write()-ing strings to the driver, described in the manpage.

  • It looks like Linux has a similar driver (see this article for example; there is also some example code on this page if you scroll down a bit.).

  • In Windows there is a function called Beep().

4
  • '\a' is defined by the C++ standard, and is extremely portable. Of course if you're using broken terminal software all bets are off, but the Win32 console subsystem and most xterm clones all process '\a' properly.
    – Ben Voigt
    Oct 30, 2010 at 20:48
  • 7
    @Ben Voigt: Correct me if I'm wrong, but the C++ standard only specify that '\a' will represent an ASCII BEL character; but it never specifies what the programs' behavior should be when sending such character to stdout. The part that ASCII BEL == '\a' is extremely portable, as you said, but the beeping part is a totally undefined behavior.
    – Lie Ryan
    Oct 30, 2010 at 21:27
  • 1
    @Ben: as far as I'm concerned, terminal software is broken if it doesn't have a way of switching off the bell. Oct 30, 2010 at 21:52
  • @Steve: I agree, but I don't read this question is "How do you make a beep when the users has explicitly turned sounds off?"
    – Ben Voigt
    Oct 30, 2010 at 23:30
5

alternatively in c or c++ after including stdio.h

char d=(char)(7);
printf("%c\n",d);

(char)7 is called the bell character.

5

You could use conditional compilation:

#ifdef WINDOWS
#include <Windows.h>
void beep() {
  Beep(440, 1000);
}
#elif LINUX
#include <stdio.h>
void beep() {
  system("echo -e "\007" >/dev/tty10");
}
#else
#include <stdio.h>
void beep() {
  cout << "\a" << flush;
}
#endif
1
4
std::cout << '\7';
3

Here's one way:

cout << '\a';

From C++ Character Constants:

Alert: \a

3
#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>
#include<windows.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{

    Beep(1568, 200);
    Beep(1568, 200);
    Beep(1568, 200);
    Beep(1245, 1000);
    Beep(1397, 200);
    Beep(1397, 200);
    Beep(1397, 200);
    Beep(1175, 1000);

cout<<endl;
_getch()

return 0
}
0
3

I tried most things here, none worked on my Ubuntu VM.

Here is a quick hack (credits goes here):

#include <iostream>
int main() {
  system("(speaker-test -t sine -f 1000)& pid=$!; sleep 1.0s; kill -9 $pid");
}

It will basically use system's speaker-test to produce the sound. This will not terminate quickly though, so the command runs it in background (the & part), then captures its process id (the pid=$1 part), sleeps for a certain amount that you can change (the sleep 1.0s part) and then it kills that process (the kill -9 $pid part).

sine is the sound produced. You can change it to pink or to a wav file.

2

Easiest way is probbaly just to print a ^G ascii bell

1
  • stdout, perhaps? There's no object named out in namespace std.
    – Ben Voigt
    Oct 30, 2010 at 20:46
0

The ASCII bell character might be what you are looking for. Number 7 in this table.

0
cout << "\a";

In Xcode, After compiling, you have to run the executable by hand to hear the beep.

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