1

I am trying to add a foreign key constraint using a varchar instead of usual int

table users:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `users` (
`userId` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`userFName` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
`userLName` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
`userEmail` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
`userPassword` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`userId`)
);

table mail:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mail` (
`mailId` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`sender` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
`receiver` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
`mailSubject` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`mailContent` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`mailSendDate` datetime NOT NULL,
CONSTRAINT fk_sender FOREIGN KEY (sender) REFERENCES users(userEmail),
CONSTRAINT fk_receiver FOREIGN KEY (receiver) REFERENCES Users(userEmail),    
PRIMARY KEY (`mailId`)
);

I get an error: foreign key constraint fail

  • when you get the error? – Juan Carlos Oropeza Nov 15 '16 at 14:40
  • while creating the mail table – Nikita Dhiman Nov 15 '16 at 14:41
  • 2
    You should index userEmail – R. Chappell Nov 15 '16 at 14:41
  • the error persists.......Cannot find an index in the referenced table where the referenced columns appear as the first columns, or column types in the table and the referenced table do not match for constraint. – Nikita Dhiman Nov 15 '16 at 14:52
2

You should reference userId instead

Imagine later one user want to change email. Then you wont be able to change it because there is a constraint in place. You will have to delete mail, then delete user, and then create user and all email.

Instead if you reference the userId, doesnt matter what email is. Also the index size is smaller because you are saving integer instead of varchar.

  • this doesn't works, the error says: Cannot find an index in the referenced table where the referenced columns appear as the first columns, or column types in the table and the referenced table do not match for constraint. – Nikita Dhiman Nov 15 '16 at 14:51
  • Did you create indexes on your key and the foreign keys? According to dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/create-table-foreign-keys.html MySQL requires indexes on foreign keys and referenced keys so that foreign key checks can be fast and not require a table scan. In the referencing table, there must be an index where the foreign key columns are listed as the first columns in the same order. – Patrick Nov 17 '16 at 7:41
1

'userEmail' is not a key of your table 'users'. A foreign key must always reference a primary or surrogate key.

Further you should create indexes on your foreign keys and the referenced key and assert that the corresponding columns have similar datatypes.

  • will adding userEmail as unique sort the problem out? – Nikita Dhiman Nov 15 '16 at 14:44
  • Some databases don't accept varchar as primary key. Further you may not change the field 'userEmail' anymore when it's a primary key and referenced by a foreign key. – Patrick Nov 15 '16 at 14:48
  • My mistake, I was getting a different error. Looks like work rextester.com/RZIHY18265 Now not sure why my answer also work. – Juan Carlos Oropeza Nov 15 '16 at 14:49
  • Why not reference 'userId'? – Patrick Nov 15 '16 at 14:52
  • 1
    @Juan: In that case, referencing 'userEmail' doesn't make sense at all. Referencing the 'userId' and keeping the used email addresses in table 'mail' as 'sender' and 'receiver' would be an appropriate design. – Patrick Nov 15 '16 at 15:03

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